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Post Reply JLPT N1
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23 / M / Shinagawa
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Posted 4/19/15
Hello! My name's not really important. What's important is this... If you're a gaijin with a university degree, do you get jobs easy with N1? If you don't have a university degree, do opportunities still open up with a passed N1?
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13 / F / California
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Posted 4/19/15 , edited 4/19/15
Huh?
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23 / M / Shinagawa
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Posted 4/19/15

VZ68 wrote:

Huh?


How much easier does life in Japan become with a passed N1?
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24 / M / Surrey, UK
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Posted 4/19/15
You may want to explain what an N1 is...
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 4/19/15 , edited 4/19/15
that's an interesting question, but i think just having a certificate is probably not enough. they probably look at your real-life fluency rather than fluency from a test score. not that i would know. then again, if you passed N1, chances are, you're probably fluent enough in most situations.

edit: N1 is the hardest level of difficulty in the proficiency test in the Japanese language. There are 5 levels of difficulty.
From easiest, to hardest: N5 -> N4 -> N3 -> N2 -> N1
the amount of kanji covered in N1 is significantly higher than N2
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23 / M / Shinagawa
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Posted 4/19/15

BlackStarLine wrote:

You may want to explain what an N1 is...


Sorry, N1 is the most difficult level of JLPT (Japanese Language Profiancy Test) wich is said to be mighty difficult.
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 4/19/15
how many kanji was there in N1? 4k was it..?
Posted 4/19/15
It really depends on what field you are going into and what requirements they have for the position you apply for. Like if you're going for teaching English, you really don't need it. They would prefer that you speak English perfectly over how much Japanese you know. Now if you are looking to work for different companies, they usually have a requirement of at least "business level" fluency in Japanese which means that having an N1 would be extremely good for you.
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 4/19/15 , edited 4/19/15
if only business level was needed, N2 would suffice, and it's several notches easier than N1.

edit:
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/community/2013/11/24/issues/is-the-jlpt-really-worth-it/
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Posted 4/19/15 , edited 4/19/15

namealreadytaken wrote:

if only business level was needed, N2 would suffice, and it's several notches easier than N1.

edit:
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/community/2013/11/24/issues/is-the-jlpt-really-worth-it/


for N1 you only need about 2000 kanji (all the jouyou kanji) while for N2 you need about 1000.
It's still double the amount, but you really don't need to know 4000 kanji unless you're a kanji nerd of some sort.

OP: A JLPT N1 won't do much. I mean surely it'll help, but being fluent in japanese or atleast semi-fluent is really bottom level requirement for working over there, unless you want to be an english teacher or similar. So yeah, you could probably get a job somewhere with a N1, but you'd probably get that without the N1 aswell, as long as you were fluent in Japanese. I guess a passed JLPT test can be a good certificate on that you're actually fluent though, so I guess it's worthwhile to have.

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21 / M
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Posted 4/19/15
Interestingly enough, I've heard from Japanese people that it's not just kids who don't know all of the 2000 jouyou kanji, the adults don't either. The magic number is more like 1700.
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 4/19/15
N1 pretty much ensures that you can read and understand Japanese newspaper and what-not.
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44 / M / Canada
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Posted 4/19/15
Unless your only job over there is reading Japanese newspapers, an N1 is not good enough. You need the actual qualifications for the job you want!!! So what do you want to do, other than reading Japanese newspapers? You'll need the degree for that and experience, etc. the same as you would for applying for that job where you currently live, aside from the Japanese of course.
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Posted 4/19/15

RedExodus wrote:

Interestingly enough, I've heard from Japanese people that it's not just kids who don't know all of the 2000 jouyou kanji, the adults don't either. The magic number is more like 1700.


I'd question what is the requirement for "knowing a kanji" according to these natives who claim they know less than the jouyou kanji.
I'd guess it might be reasonable if you're talking about being able to write the kanji in the "correct" stroke order, but otherwise I highly doubt that a typical japanese person knows less than the jouyou kanji.

Knowing only 1700 kanji - you'd have problems reading regular newspapers, it just wouldn't work out...
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M / Mexico
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Posted 4/19/15 , edited 4/19/15
I`m N2 at the moment and I`m planning to take N1 by the end of this year (in my country we just have the december test)

I work in the car manufacturing business and japanese is one the key skills needed, I work for the enterprise that sells the paint process (Phosphate, E-coat, primer, base and clear coat) to car manufacturers, I`m responsible for japanese clients (Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Mazda, etc.)

Let me tell you that they don`t really care about my JLPT level but instead the actual speaking and reading skills (also translation skills) even tough I`m not a translator (I`m industrial engineering) BUUUUUT....some guys have asked me if I have taken the JLPT test and they get prettty amazed when I tell the I`m N2 and have offered me some job options...

So I think the most important is to have actual skills and you know that JLPT doesn`t really tests your speaking skills.

For the kanji, well you need at least 1,800 but the better way is to learn the whole Touyou kanji list (a total of 2,145) because any kanji outside this list needs to have furigana on top so you can read it.

I`ve studied for 7 years (almost 8), I lived in Japan for months and have travel 3 times more for business trips, twice for vacation (and one more for vacation in 10 days from now) also I have a lot of study materials (around 80 books)...so if you need any help I`d gladly help ^___^

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