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Post Reply We’re Having An Election As Well!
dsjb 
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Posted 4/23/15 , edited 4/23/15

So there are allot of threads around were all us none USA crunchyrollers come in to comment on the USA, its political processes and parties.

Turnabout being fair play and all, this thread is here so you can give British politics a good kicking as well.

Who would you none UK residents vote for? What do you think of our somewhat eccentric political system?

Don’t know anything about the UK elections process here’s a quick briefing!


So how does it work?

The business of Government takes place in two "houses": the completely elected House of Commons and the House of Lords, whose members are selected by a mix of being appointed for life/elected from hereditary title holders/appointed by the Church of England.

The makeup of the House of Commons determines the party of government at any particular time, it consists of 650 members known as members of parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies around the country and may hold their seats until the next election (at most 5 years). In each constituency most political parties will put forward a candidate who will join any independent candidates on the ballot. The candidate with the most votes in a given constituency gets the seat, the votes for other candidates have no further effect on the process.

Once the control of each seat has been decided the party with the most seats has the first chance to form a majority government. In the past this has usually been simple as one party has controlled more than 50% of the seats however recently we have been moving to more “hung” parliaments in which the major parties require the support of others to form a coalition majority. This support is usually gained by policy compromises by the largest party in directions favoured by their coalition partners. Once a majority coalition has been formed the leader of the largest party is appointed Prime minister by the Queen. (it is also possible to form a minority government as the largest party if no one can agree to work together just don’t expect to get much done!)

A Bill is a proposal for a new law, or a proposal to change an existing law, presented for debate before Parliament.

A Bill can start in the Commons or the Lords and must be approved in the same form by both Houses before becoming an Act (law).

In theory each MP may vote as they choose on any bill, in practice party lines are nearly absolute enforced by party whips. Defiance of whip may result in expulsion from the MPs party leaving them as an independent.
The house of Lords while it does have members belonging to the various political parties Is much less divided along party lines with members of the same party voting on both sides of many bills being a frequent occurrence.
Finally the bill heads off for royal approval, essentially a formality.

So what parties are there?


I’m only going to cover the major parties represented in the recent debates here in alphabetical order. I’m also going to try to be a neutral as I can be describing their general politics.

The Conservative Party- A centre Right party economically comparable to the American democrats, the major party in the current coalition government. Generally in favour of Lower taxation, smaller government expenditure and more integration of private businesses to provide public services. They support some forms of welfare namely the NHS (national health service) and a basic social safety net for those out of work focussed on incentivising a return to work. They used to considerably more socially conservative however they recently have opened up on some social issues such as legalising gay marriage. One of the two major parties that have dominated the last few decades. There is a perception they have moved to the left in comparison to their past governments possibly as a consequence of being tied to the Liberal democrats in coalition. In favour of limited Immigration.

The Green Party- A left wing party often been viewed as a 'single issue' environmentalist party, but while it still maintains its environmental policies and political ecology, it also has a history of support for collectivist economic policies, including well-funded, locally controlled public services within the confines of a steady state economy and a high rate of Income tax. It also takes a progressive approach to social policies such as animal rights, LGBT rights and drug policy reform, and believes strongly in nonviolence, basic material security, and democratic participation. It recently won its first seat (a major step for a party in the Uk’s system)

The Labour Party- A centre left wing party and the other major party of UK politics. The party contains a diversity of ideological trends from strongly socialist, to more moderately social democratic. Generally in favour of higher taxation to pay for higher quality public services and a robust social safety net and retaining public control of public services. Historically the party was considerably more left wing economically than its current position having moved to the centre during the “new labour” years under Tony Blair. Divided on social issues other than welfare they have historically been a big tent on social issues such as abortion/Stem cells etc. Broadly in favour of immigration and multiculturalism.

The Liberal Democrats- A centrist socialy liberal political party in the United Kingdom. They are currently the third-largest party in the United Kingdom in the House of Commons and the smaller party in the coalition government. The liberal ideal is of the open society, where power is vested in people, not in the state or other institutions which they believe must be as open as possible to public scrutiny. Generally in favour of increasing social mobility through the expansion of economic freedom and opportunity. The party is economically somewhere between the Conservatives and Labour with taxes extremely low for low income earners (mirroring the conservative party) increasing to higher rates for higher earners (though still not as high as the Labour or Green Parties). Has a history of good local level government and championing liberal social policy from the local level. The party has fallen somewhat out of favour recently with some of its members as many perceived it to have propped up the Conservative coalition with little gains for its own policies.

Plaid Cymru- A welsh national party, I honestly don’t know enough about these guys to give a fair assessment so I shall take their aims from their party constitution.

1. To promote the constitutional advancement of Wales with a view to attaining independence within the European Union;
2. To ensure economic prosperity, social justice and the health of the natural environment, based on decentralist socialism;
3. To build a national community based on equal citizenship, respect for different traditions and cultures and the equal worth of all individuals, whatever their race, nationality, gender, colour, creed, sexuality, age, ability or social background;
4. To create a bilingual society by promoting the revival of the Welsh language;
5. To promote Wales's contribution to the global community and to attain membership of the United Nations.


The Scottish National Party- A Centre Left Nationalist party that generally competes with the Labour party for seats within Scotland. The primary goal of the SNP is to further devolved power for Scotland with a view to eventual independence. The SNP's policy base is mostly in the mainstream European social democratic tradition. Among its policies are commitments to same-sex marriage, reducing the voting age to 16, unilateral nuclear disarmament, progressive personal taxation, the eradication of poverty, the building of affordable social housing, free higher education, opposition to the building of new nuclear power plants, investment in renewable energy, and a pay increase for nurses, teachers and other public sector workers. The recent failed Independence referendum might have been seen as a setback but polling suggests it has actually triggered a popularity surge for the SNP. Many predict they will do well in the coming elections making inroads into the traditionally labour seats in Scotland.

The UK Independence party
-A Right wing populist party originally perceived as a single issue party seeking an exit by the UK from the European Union, it has in recent years expanded its policies gaining the support of many people disillusioned with the traditional parties. Socially more conservative they have attracted support for their opposition to gay marriage and a highly restrictive immigration policy. They support Independent rule of the UK by the UK without interference by global bodies such as the UN, the European court of human rights and EU. A number of conservative MPs have defected from their original party to UKIP and they seem poised to eat into some of the traditionally conservative vote. Fiscally things are varied seeming to favour lower taxes and increased public spending by making savings to the budget from cutting policies such as the foreign aid budget and EU payments.

So you’ve made it to the end of the post. Congrats!
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Posted 4/23/15
Funny we have a federal election coming up in Canada as well.
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24 / M / Scotland
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Posted 4/23/15 , edited 4/23/15
Every single one of my friends are voting SNP this time round. According to electionforcast.co.uk there is a 97% chance that they'll take my home constituency from Labour and there is a 100% chance that they'll keep it in the constituency I currently live in. They're the only ones to have a good record of running a country and they also have a charismatic leader. Everybody I know agrees that the SNP have run Scotland well.

I'm personally voting Labour to keep UKIP out of power. The more seats that Labour have, the more likely that we can stop the UK leaving the EU. I don't want another tory government and I don't want a referendum on EU membership. Either way, I think that a Labour/SNP coalition would be in our best interests.
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Posted 4/23/15
I like this because people aren't bound to party lines as much. Gives more choices and more points of view. America really never actually had more than two parties that were viable, starting with the Federalists and the Democrat-Republicans and the closest it got to breaking free of that was when the bull moose party was started by Theodore Roosevelt back in the early 1900s. If that could have taken hold then we wouldn't have the polarization in the country we see today.
Posted 4/23/15 , edited 4/23/15
Well, I've relatives and friends in the UK. My relatives are all saying something needs to be done about the severe Islamification and the massive problems with Immigration, especially concerning Poles and Muslims and people who cannot speak/pick up English well. My friends are getting sick of the Immigrants to the UK who cannot seem to assimilate (from what they have said countless times) and refuse to learn English.

They both hate this party called UKIP saying they're extremely racist, but they also hate this Labour party or something, saying it is too one-sided and doing everything wrong, especially concerning Immigration. They have mixed feelings about the other parties.

I can't really state my opinion as I don't know enough to have a basis to form one, but I'm just saying what they're saying. Anyone else agree with these views or not?

EDIT: If I had to say what I would be interested in...I would have to go for much less immigration (at the moment) since the UK is such a small country, and make sure that the people immigrating do not have criminal pasts, know English fluently, and make an effort to assimilate more. I too am against the Islamification of any place outside of a Muslim country...especially for Europe which seems to have a lot of problems in this area. I don't really care about the color or race of the person immigrating just as long as they contribute to society positively. I am not too keen on Muslim immigration though, in all honesty.

I don't know what party I'd be a part of. Definitely not something too left wing, and definitely not something too right wing. I'd probably lean a bit more conservative though, overall.

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Posted 4/23/15 , edited 4/23/15
It seems neither the Conservatives or the Labor Party will win a significant majority in Parliament even if they win the general election. Hopefully, the Labor Party can form a coalition with the SNP/Greens. Remove the Tories from power, and keep the delusional UKIP from mucking things up.
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Posted 4/23/15

teallerina wrote:
EDIT: If I had to say what I would be interested in...I would have to go for much less immigration since the UK is such a small country, and make sure that the people immigrating do not have criminal pasts, know English fluently, and make an effort to assimilate more. I too am against the Islamification of any place outside of a Muslim country...especially for Europe which seems to have a lot of problems in this area. I don't really care about the color or race of the person immigrating just as long as they contribute to society positively. I am not too keen on Muslim immigration though, in all honesty.

I don't know what party I'd be a part of. Definitely not something too left wing, and definitely not something too right wing. I'd probably lean a bit more conservative...?



In Scotland we actually want to encourage immigration because our population is falling and there are clear economic benefits that immigration brings to our economy. Our NHS couldn't survive without workers from other countries and the amount of taxes they bring in (no matter what job they get) show that they benefit our economy greatly.

Despite this, those strict immigration policies are considered a positive thing in the south east of England. The south east is the part where most people immigrate to and they don't look at immigration as positively as we do. If you're a citizen outside of the EU then there are restrictions in place to stop immigrants from being able to immigrate if they have previous problems or don't speak English - albeit their ability to speak English doesn't always translate into them actively using it.

Despite this, in Scotland the Muslims who immigrate here assimilate well. They all add our culture to theirs while we accept theirs. All of them that I've met have learned how to speak English. I personally think that immigration is just a scapegoat and in the end it's something to be encouraged rather than discouraged. Glasgow once had a population of one million - It now holds about 600,000. We have plenty of space in Scotland - more people should be moving here. It's a question of where rather than how much in my opinion.

I agree with your family concerning UKIP. I don't hate Labour though - Labour seem to be a safe playing party right now and I think that's what the country needs to be doing right now. That's opinion though so I don't blame anybody for thinking otherwise.

If you did have a vote then the conservatives seem to be the closest thing to your ideology I think.
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Posted 4/23/15

dsjb wrote:


The Conservative Party- A centre Right party economically comparable to the American democrats, the major party in the current coalition government. Generally in favour of Lower taxation, smaller government expenditure and more integration of private businesses to provide public services. They support some forms of welfare namely the NHS (national health service) and a basic social safety net for those out of work focussed on incentivising a return to work. They used to considerably more socially conservative however they recently have opened up on some social issues such as legalising gay marriage. One of the two major parties that have dominated the last few decades. There is a perception they have moved to the left in comparison to their past governments possibly as a consequence of being tied to the Liberal democrats in coalition. In favour of limited Immigration.



...But aren't the Democrats I mean Demopublicans (or Republicrats) in favor of more taxation and higher government spending?

Is there a I H8 Poly-Ticks party? or maybe I Hate Politicians And All Of Their Doubletalk, Party?
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Posted 4/23/15
Thanks for the detailed analysis, very easy to read and made a lot of sense. I don't like the idea of the House of Lords not being elected by the people and it can be like a family lineage thing
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Posted 4/23/15
For the benefit of all, I offer this additional aid for determining one's relative agreement with party stances on a range of current issues:

https://uk.isidewith.com/political-quiz

If you can't be bothered with the quiz, Wiki's got your back:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_parties_in_the_United_Kingdom

I strongly recommend reading all stances and answering all questions for the best results. As for myself, I have the most in common with the SNP, and the least in common with UKIP and the Tories. I see the Lib Dems as that party that no one really seems to like all that much, but just doesn't ever seem to go away.
Sogno- 
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Posted 4/23/15
let's vote for SJWs and watch the world burn
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Posted 4/23/15

nanikore2 wrote:


dsjb wrote:


The Conservative Party- A centre Right party economically comparable to the American democrats, the major party in the current coalition government. Generally in favour of Lower taxation, smaller government expenditure and more integration of private businesses to provide public services. They support some forms of welfare namely the NHS (national health service) and a basic social safety net for those out of work focussed on incentivising a return to work. They used to considerably more socially conservative however they recently have opened up on some social issues such as legalising gay marriage. One of the two major parties that have dominated the last few decades. There is a perception they have moved to the left in comparison to their past governments possibly as a consequence of being tied to the Liberal democrats in coalition. In favour of limited Immigration.



...But aren't the Democrats I mean Demopublicans (or Republicrats) in favor of more taxation and higher government spending?

Is there a I H8 Poly-Ticks party? or maybe I Hate Politicians And All Of Their Doubletalk, Party?


The US Democrats with any political power and/or name recognition are closer to a mix of his descriptions of the Labour Party and the Green Party. The US Republicans with political power and/or name recognition are currently split. You have the establishment Republicans, who are not like any of the UK party descriptions given. And you have the non-establishment Republicans, who are more like the description given for the UK Conservative Party. As far as the citizens go, I don't know that anyone truly has a beat on where the majority lies in either party. However, they are all over the board, both with the Republicans and the Democrats. Many just vote with the party they associate with regardless if the candidate's message is one they agree with or not.
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Posted 4/23/15 , edited 4/23/15

dsjb wrote:




Very good assessment, the UK has a lot more parties than the U.S. and we should envy them for sure.

So I'd like to do a quick counter-agreement, and maybe support your assessment, I suppose.

The American population that votes Democrat(US) are choosing Conservative(UK) candidates to promote Green(UK), Labour(UK), Liberal(UK), and I think even Plaid(UK) ideals. The socialist and independent movements in the US have their best chances with the Democratic party, and though a registered Independent, I have consistently voted Democrat at the Federal scale.

The populations that votes Republican(US) are choosing Conservative(UK) candidates to promote National(UK) and UKIP(UK) ideals. The Libertarian and Statist movements have their best chances with the Republican party. Ernie Chambers is the greatest State Senator we have, the only Independent we have, Nebraska has one of two state legislatures that allows an independent, but I've voted Republican in state elections for smaller jobs than senator.

Doesn't Nigel have a Polish duel to get to?

Imagine if your Conservative party had to represent UKIP, the Scottish National Party, and the more austere half of the Conservative Party all at once, while the rest was left to the Democrats. I am jealous of your options.
Posted 4/23/15 , edited 4/23/15
I had a dream about Nigel Farage, probably because I finally looked at YouTube videos of the guy. He's intelligent, cunning and very good at manipulation. That's about all the same, I suppose.
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Posted 4/23/15
Look Ma, Those Europee'in UK Folks iz Voting. They gave all the Power to the EU Bureaucrats, ain't they the cutest thing.
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