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Post Reply Why do Americans call it football?
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Posted 4/29/15
Basically, im wondering if anyone knows the historical reason why Americans started calling their game football and changed the other one to soccer?

I'll start by saying im not trying to be racist or hateful to America but im just wondering why Americans stole the name of Football and applyed it to their game?

We in the UK have been using the name of Football for hundreds of years, well longer than America has been the United states and American football isnt anywhere near the same game as soccer.

Any info?

Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/9/15
Because they're uneducated.
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/8/15
Because we're idiots
Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/8/15
the same reason they call petrol gas even though it's liquid.
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/9/15
Some reference on one or the other. The TL;DR of it all is that American "football" is loosely based off Rugby and that the Brits coined the word "soccer" and are to blame for its usage.

- This Is Why We Call It 'Soccer,' Not 'Football'
- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/13/soccer-not-football-_n_5492714.html

The word "soccer," which is believed to have originated in Britain some 200 years ago, comes from the official name of the sport, "association football." As other versions of the game evolved to include Rugby Football, it is believed the Brits adopted colloquialisms to distinguish each game.

"The rugby football game was shortened to 'rugger,' a term recognized in British English to the present day, and the association football game was, plausibly, shortened to 'soccer'" Szymanski writes. (Apparently ending words in "er" was a fad back then.)

Gradually, the term "soccer" gained popularity in the U.S. to distinguish the sport from American football. By the 1980s, the Brits began to part with the term, apparently, because it had become too "American."


- Why is American football called football, given that most of the activity involves the hands?
- http://www.quora.com/Why-is-American-football-called-football-given-that-most-of-the-activity-involves-the-hands

The missing link here that makes it make sense is rugby. Or, as it used to be more commonly known... wait for it... rugby football.

Before The Game Sometimes Known As Soccer was THE "football", it was one of several variants of "football" -- soccer was "association football", rugby was "rugby football", there's also Australian rules football, Gaelic football, etc. Association football won the popularity war and became the game we now generically think of as "football", but there was a time when it was just one of many such games.

American football? Well, if you study the games, it's pretty clear that American football has strong rugby DNA in its roots. So if you view rugby as American football's uncle, then it's still part of the more generic "football" family, even if much less of that game is played with the feet and even if the term "football" has come to mostly be tied to "association" football.

- Football (US)
- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Football_(word)#United_States

In the United States, the word "football" usually refers to the sport of American football, a variation of gridiron football. However, as in Canada, "football" refers to soccer if the game is neither Canadian nor American in context.

The sport of association football is commonly called "soccer" in the United States. Despite evidence of the sport being called "football" in the late-1800s/early-to-mid-1900s in the country and having a then-significant popularity, soccer has been lacking a nationwide popularity throughout the 20th century, having a significantly smaller mainstream audience than its gridiron counterpart and other popular sports in the USA.

Despite the earlier obscurity soccer does have a considerable following, particularly among younger people and immigrant or immigrant-born first generation families from countries whose cultures are tied closely to the sport.[50] Recently soccer has surged interest in the mainstream audience starting with the United States hosting the World Cup in 1994.

Rugby union is generally known as Rugby, with the "union" name rarely used. Gaelic football and rugby league have very small, albeit growing, numbers of adherents. Most people in the United States are not usually aware of the distinction between rugby union and rugby league, and consequently both are referred to simply as "rugby".

Because of the number of American players in the Canadian Football League, a small number of Americans follow Canadian football, which is occasionally broadcast on American cable channels. Because of the similarity between American and Canadian football, many people in both countries do not consider the two styles of football separate sports per se, but rather different codes of the same sport due to their shared origin.


Also:

- Why Americans Call Soccer 'Soccer'
- http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/06/why-we-call-soccer-soccer/372771/

- Historians reveal why America calls the game that the rest of the world calls football 'soccer' - and find the British are to blame
- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2657548/A-game-two-names-Historians-reveal-America-calls-football-soccer-British-blame.html
Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/9/15
Why do you drive on the left side of the road?
Why do you call drunk driving drink driving?
Why do you call fries chips?
Why do you have a Royal Family?
Seriously why do you have a Royal Family?
Why do you spell words with u, (colour, honour, etc)?

We're even.
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/9/15


For a serious answer
From my understanding, it’s because Rugby, the game that America football is based used to be refered to as Rugby football and over the years the "football" part of the name was dropped in day to day usage in the UK so it is commonly referred to as Rugby. As Rugby football became more and more different in the states, it became to be known American football. However, as a little interesting fact the governing body for the Rugby Union is called the Rugby Football Union.
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/9/15

AiYumega wrote:

Why do you drive on the left side of the road?
Why do you call drunk driving drink driving?
Why do you call fries chips?
Why do you have a Royal Family?
Seriously why do you have a Royal Family?
Why do you spell words with u, (colour, honour, etc)?

We're even.


Why don't you?
........
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Posted 4/29/15

GayAsianBoy wrote:

the same reason they call petrol gas even though it's liquid.


They actually say its gas as its short for gasoline
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 5/9/15

AiYumega wrote:

Why do you drive on the left side of the road?
Why do you call drunk driving drink driving?
Why do you call fries chips?
Why do you have a Royal Family?
Seriously why do you have a Royal Family?
Why do you spell words with u, (colour, honour, etc)?

We're even.


Very true, however...

Why do you drive on the left side of the road? Its gotta be one or the other, right?

Why do you call drunk driving drink driving? Because, you drink. Self explanatory?

Why do you call fries chips? Chips of potatos I guess?

Why do you have a Royal Family? Most of us agree with you, I think the reason we keep them is because we've always had one so it would seem weird not too, I guess.

Seriously why do you have a Royal Family?

Why do you spell words with u, (colour, honour, etc)? Its OUR language, so we can do what the fuck we want with it
Posted 4/29/15
tell 'em scootybby.

have seen a few americans trying to turn the word american into a category of language, too.
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 4/29/15
No idea.
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 4/29/15
It evolved from Rugby Football in England.
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Posted 4/29/15 , edited 4/29/15

GayAsianBoy wrote:

tell 'em scootybby.

have seen a few americans trying to turn the word american into a category of language, too.


Whenever a topic like this comes up, theres always a few Americans who say 'well why do you have a royal family' like thats going to offend us?

Who gives a fuck if we have a royal family anyway!? Their just symbols of Britain. Thats all there is too it...
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Posted 4/29/15

Scooty-Bby wrote:


GayAsianBoy wrote:

the same reason they call petrol gas even though it's liquid.


They actually say its gas as its short for gasoline :)


Kinda like their petrol is short for petroleum..

I'll accept SOME britishisms (really I think they borrow the best from other languages themselves.. like aubergines instead of eggplants, and courgettes instead of zucchini), but some of the stuff they do is just weird.

(i'd say something about the rest of the world driving on the ride side of the street, but then they'd hit me back with something about how the rest of the world uses metric too. Then I'd say that the rest of the world at least can drive, but still can't divide a meter into three equal parts. Then it would be a showdown...)
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