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Posted 5/3/15 , edited 5/3/15
*Slams hand on a desk*

NOW THIS IS THE CONTENT I'D LIKE TO SEE!

... But honestly, I am uneducated on that matter. I'm just very intrigued by astronomy and reading anything about it makes my mind whirl. I'm definitely going to go research more about this though.
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Posted 5/3/15


Aside from the "Your mom" joke at the end, was that really a real representation of star sizes? Or was that made up to set up the joke?

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Posted 5/3/15 , edited 5/3/15
Every now and again I read a story on astronomy that details a discovery "we never knew could, or even expected to happen" - just shows how much we have yet to learn about how the universe works!

Pluto will always be a planet in my book (at worst it could be the representative for all the planetoids in our system).

"The heavens declare the glory of God"
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Posted 5/3/15

PurpleDjango wrote:

After taking that optional astronomy class in High School I thought I had learned most everything basic about the formation of stars. Until I read a recent report from CNN, it appears that a small dim star 500 lyrs away has a gas giant close to the size of Jupiter.

You might say, is that normal?

No it is not, when a star is formed planets are made up of what is left over, gasses condense under the weight of gravity creating more dense elements.

This star, simply is not large enough to have created this planet, nor does it have the gravity to pull it so close, this star is much much smaller than ours and cooler.

Most gas giants form close to the star, and their gravity usually causes them to drift further from the inner orbit of the star. In this very case the stars lower gravity should allow this larger planet to drift MUCH further away, why doesn't it?

Has everything we know of gas giants and their formation been wrong?

Please explain to your best knowledge why and how this gas giant formed.

Please obey all crunchyroll rules.


There is a very likely chance that the large gas giant was once a roaming planet and the planet simply got too close to that star's gravitational pull, forcing it into an orbit. Despite the fact that the star is smaller and cooler, this is still a possibility since most roaming planets, as far as we know, are gas giants and there are millions of them since roaming planets are rather common.
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Posted 5/4/15


I was expecting Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann at the end.
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Posted 5/4/15
The world is ending, I tell you!

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Posted 5/4/15

DeadlyOats wrote:



Aside from the "Your mom" joke at the end, was that really a real representation of star sizes? Or was that made up to set up the joke?



Oh it's all real, really shows just how small we are in the universe.
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Posted 5/4/15

Nightblade370 wrote:


PurpleDjango wrote:

After taking that optional astronomy class in High School I thought I had learned most everything basic about the formation of stars. Until I read a recent report from CNN, it appears that a small dim star 500 lyrs away has a gas giant close to the size of Jupiter.

You might say, is that normal?

No it is not, when a star is formed planets are made up of what is left over, gasses condense under the weight of gravity creating more dense elements.

This star, simply is not large enough to have created this planet, nor does it have the gravity to pull it so close, this star is much much smaller than ours and cooler.

Most gas giants form close to the star, and their gravity usually causes them to drift further from the inner orbit of the star. In this very case the stars lower gravity should allow this larger planet to drift MUCH further away, why doesn't it?

Has everything we know of gas giants and their formation been wrong?

Please explain to your best knowledge why and how this gas giant formed.

Please obey all crunchyroll rules.


There is a very likely chance that the large gas giant was once a roaming planet and the planet simply got too close to that star's gravitational pull, forcing it into an orbit. Despite the fact that the star is smaller and cooler, this is still a possibility since most roaming planets, as far as we know, are gas giants and there are millions of them since roaming planets are rather common.

Good possibility, didn't think about that, might be something else who knows, astronomy is still young.
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Posted 5/4/15

DeadlyOats wrote:

How about this, then? The star formed, and the gas giant was one of them wandering giants and it got caught in the star's gravity field when it came in too close...


I read in a book that some of these close orbiting gas giants are actually failed stars, they have very high quantities of hydrogen but never reach a mass or core pressure capable of producing the multi-million kelvin degrees required for fusion.

I know I've seen and heard of scientists supporting the idea you pointed out. There usually isn't enough gas leftover near a star during the formation phase to create gas giants that close to a star, so it very well could have been a rouge planet from somewhere else that was pulled in.

My personal thought on the failed star theory would be that the two objects would have to form somewhat far apart at roughly the same time. My understanding though is that planets like that typically have very unstable orbits, to the point some eventually merge with the host star.
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Posted 5/4/15 , edited 5/4/15

PurpleDjango wrote:


Nightblade370 wrote:


PurpleDjango wrote:

After taking that optional astronomy class in High School I thought I had learned most everything basic about the formation of stars. Until I read a recent report from CNN, it appears that a small dim star 500 lyrs away has a gas giant close to the size of Jupiter.

You might say, is that normal?

No it is not, when a star is formed planets are made up of what is left over, gasses condense under the weight of gravity creating more dense elements.

This star, simply is not large enough to have created this planet, nor does it have the gravity to pull it so close, this star is much much smaller than ours and cooler.

Most gas giants form close to the star, and their gravity usually causes them to drift further from the inner orbit of the star. In this very case the stars lower gravity should allow this larger planet to drift MUCH further away, why doesn't it?

Has everything we know of gas giants and their formation been wrong?

Please explain to your best knowledge why and how this gas giant formed.

Please obey all crunchyroll rules.


There is a very likely chance that the large gas giant was once a roaming planet and the planet simply got too close to that star's gravitational pull, forcing it into an orbit. Despite the fact that the star is smaller and cooler, this is still a possibility since most roaming planets, as far as we know, are gas giants and there are millions of them since roaming planets are rather common.

Good possibility, didn't think about that, might be something else who knows, astronomy is still young.


Indeed, indeed. It's hard to ever be certain, but scientists do their best to discern the truth; if there is a possibility, they will consider it and do everything they can to align the facts and dismiss the falsehoods. Perhaps one day, the truth shall be revealed.
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