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Posted 6/1/15 , edited 6/3/15

THE KICKSTARTER HAS MET ITS GOAL! REJOICE!

THE KICKSTARTER ENDS ON JUNE 25th








About the Project


A true treat for Anime lovers, Otaku no Video is an outrageous mockumentary that combines the superb animation that made Gainax one of Japan's best-loved animation studios with truly strange live-action interviews with "real fans".

Sit back and enjoy this thinly-disguised alternate history of Gainax, as a small band of Otaku set out to "Otakunize" the entire human race.


Key People

Robert Woodhead is one of the founders of AnimEigo, one of the original wave of Anime releasing companies. Over the years AnimEigo has released hundreds of Anime and Samurai film titles in both dubbed and subtitled form. He's the creative and technical guy.
UEKI Natsumi is Robert's wife and partner. She's a level-headed businesswoman who describes her career as "a quarter-century of successfully preventing Robert from bankrupting the company."


MURAHAMA Shoji (Animation Producer and the "cel thief" in ONV)
YAMAGA Hiroyuki (Gainax President & Founding Member)
SATO Hiroki (Anime Producer, former manager of the General Products Tokyo store and the "garage kit otaku" in ONV)
INOUE Kikuko (voice actress)


Videos

https://vimeo.com/129219326
https://vimeo.com/129233056
https://vimeo.com/127479104


Additional Art




This project has definitely grabbed my attention! They're really pulling for western support and are heavily marketing to us. I love this because more Japanese studios need to start looking over to the west more often. If this project goes through I think this will be a good step in the right direction for bigger and better things.

Also, it looks and sounds just plain awesome. Love the 80's anime style as well.
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Thanks for posting about this.

I remember first seeing this when the convention promoters were trying to hype people up at BayCon for AnimeCon '91, since Gainax were major guests at that con. Man, I feel old....

Don't know how well it holds up, but there's definitely a lot of nostalgia here.
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There's a lot of neat history here from Gainax, including the Kamina glasses; yes, they start here sort of. Love the story too. It looks astoundingly crisp and colorful in HD. Will be in for the $50 tier most likely.
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Posted 6/1/15 , edited 6/1/15

imaginarycreatures wrote:

Thanks for posting about this.

I remember first seeing this when the convention promoters were trying to hype people up at BayCon for AnimeCon '91, since Gainax were major guests at that con. Man, I feel old....

Don't know how well it holds up, but there's definitely a lot of nostalgia here.


Lol 1991? Wow, I wasn't even born then lmao XD That is a long time ago!!!


sonic720 wrote:



There's a lot of neat history here from Gainax, including the Kamina glasses; yes, they start here sort of. Love the story too. It looks astoundingly crisp and colorful in HD. Will be in for the $50 tier most likely.


Definitely, it's kind of a shame that now they've kind of tanked ever since the Gurren Lagann/Trigger guys left it.

And I think I'll be doing the $50 one as well, I want a physical copy.
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LoomyTheBrew wrote:


imaginarycreatures wrote:

Thanks for posting about this.

I remember first seeing this when the convention promoters were trying to hype people up at BayCon for AnimeCon '91, since Gainax were major guests at that con. Man, I feel old....

Don't know how well it holds up, but there's definitely a lot of nostalgia here.


Lol 1991? Wow, I wasn't even born then lmao XD That is a long time ago!!!


LOL. Yeah, I've been in anime fandom for a *long* time. My parents actually used to have dinner at conventions with Robert Woodhead and Toren Smith, among other people. My brother and I worked staff at AnimeCon '91 (to my knowledge, the first west-coast anime convention). There's a bunch of fun stories I could tell about Japanese guests at American conventions back then, since my brother worked the Green Room.

The fandom was a lot smaller back then, that's for sure. It was an interesting culture to grow up in as a kid.
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imaginarycreatures wrote:


LoomyTheBrew wrote:


imaginarycreatures wrote:

Thanks for posting about this.

I remember first seeing this when the convention promoters were trying to hype people up at BayCon for AnimeCon '91, since Gainax were major guests at that con. Man, I feel old....

Don't know how well it holds up, but there's definitely a lot of nostalgia here.


Lol 1991? Wow, I wasn't even born then lmao XD That is a long time ago!!!


LOL. Yeah, I've been in anime fandom for a *long* time. My parents actually used to have dinner at conventions with Robert Woodhead and Toren Smith, among other people. My brother and I worked staff at AnimeCon '91 (to my knowledge, the first west-coast anime convention). There's a bunch of fun stories I could tell about Japanese guests at American conventions back then, since my brother worked the Green Room.

The fandom was a lot smaller back then, that's for sure. It was an interesting culture to grow up in as a kid.


Ha! That's awesome! That's really cool that both you and your brother was into it. How did you originally get into it? And yes, definitely tell some of those stories. What type of people came to the Anime Con back then? It must have been an interesting crowd, eh?
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LoomyTheBrew wrote:

Ha! That's awesome! That's really cool that both you and your brother was into it. How did you originally get into it? And yes, definitely tell some of those stories. What type of people came to the Anime Con back then? It must have been an interesting crowd, eh?


Hmmm...the simplest way to explain this.

My parents ran a book & video store in Sacramento that specialized in sci-fi and fantasy. We also sold our goods at conventions throughout California, and occasionally Oregon. At the time, there weren't a lot of Star Trek-type conventions, or even that many comic book conventions, so mostly we went to literary sci-fi conventions.

One of those conventions was BayCon, which is primarily known in the anime world for the work Toren Smith did in exposing science fiction fans to anime, via the program guides at BayCons '86-88 (and possibly 89; it's been a long time). IIRC, he was the first person in U.S. fandom to popularize the use of the word "anime" instead of the then more commonly used term "Japanimation".

It was a fairly small convention by today's standards, but 1500 or so people was pretty big at the time. My parents, being friends with much of the personnel at the con, volunteered my brother and I to work at the con, mainly because it would give us additional access to the con in spite of our young age (we started when we were 9 and 11).

The organization that put on BayCon eventually started a convention for anime called AnimeCon. In the end, there was only the one; the convention got subsumed into the convention that is now Anime Expo, to give you some historical context. But AnimeCon was an incredibly pivotal moment for American anime fandom, since they were partnering with General Products/Gainax, who were then promoting their new series, Gunbuster. Some of the staff were incredibly good at getting guests; among the people at that con were Leiji Matsumoto (Star Blazers, Captain Harlock), Kenichi Sonoda (Bubblegum Crisis, Riding Bean, Gunsmith Cats), Haruhiko Mikimoto (Macross), and so on. Pretty much all their guests of honor would be spectacular guests at a major convention, even today, but they showed up to this con with barely 1000 people at it, since there really weren't a lot of people looking for guests at American shows back then.

It was very different from today; the anime fan base of the time was mostly sci-fi fans, about 75% male, and mostly in their 20's and 30's. The fandom grew out of that to become much, much different, obviously, but that's how it started.

I helped out with the Art Show, since I was considered trustworthy with money; my brother (who's 2 years younger) was involved with kitchen prep and shopping duties for the Green Room, so he was actually helping make food for some of the luminaries of the anime/manga world.

One funny story from this con: the person who headed up the Green Room at the convention had to pick up Kenichi Sonoda at the airport. Pretty much from the first moment he hit American soil, he wanted to go somewhere and shoot some guns.

Anyway, as time passed, my parents were pretty actively selling anime videos via mail order and in their store, which at the time, meant dealing directly with Carl Macek, John O'Donnell, Robert Woodhead, and the other people at the few existing anime video distributors.

Business hit a rough patch, and my father began screen-printing T-shirts to supplement our income. Using his connections, we wound up making convention shirts for a few anime conventions in the Bay Area.

In one case (Anime America '94), there was a screw-up at the con, and they had another person selling convention shirts as well. Apparently, the shirt designs we had, had not been cleared with the mangaka that had produced the characters, who was also the guest of honor at the convention: Go Nagai. Even though I'm biased, I'll say that the shirts we made were really good; we did four designs, for Devilman, Violence Jack, Mazinger, and Grendizer.

Anyway, the convention organizers ran the situation by Mr. Nagai, who then asked to see the shirts. He then asked for a second opinion, from his wife. I don't know the details of the conversation, since I spoke even less Japanese then than I do now, but I've pretty much always gotten the impression that he was asking her for permission to let us sell them. Eventually, he agreed, in exchange for one of each shirt. Probably, of all the fanboy moments I've ever had, that was about the greatest. I was 16 at the time, which is really the ideal age to experience the work of Go Nagai, and he hasn't really done very many U.S. shows since then.

I'll edit in a photo of one of the shirts in a bit.

Edit:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByrMCVlMn5moVWdKeFRKa0hNcGdkUVJzRXlnWXo5a1FGNkpJ/view?usp=sharing

But that's basically how I started in anime.
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imaginarycreaturesI remember first seeing this when the convention promoters were trying to hype people up at BayCon for AnimeCon '91, since Gainax were major guests at that con. Man, I feel old....

Don't know how well it holds up, but there's definitely a lot of nostalgia here.

LOL. Yeah, I've been in anime fandom for a *long* time. My parents actually used to have dinner at conventions with Robert Woodhead and Toren Smith, among other people. My brother and I worked staff at AnimeCon '91 (to my knowledge, the first west-coast anime convention). There's a bunch of fun stories I could tell about Japanese guests at American conventions back then, since my brother worked the Green Room.


Used to have this info on file, but lost it, so now I'll have to ask again:
Was Baycon or AnimeCon the one where they first showed that ten-minute opening film of The History of Anime set to Dvorak's New World Symphony (arguably the first AMV ever made)?
Been trying to track that down, and I found an old con geezer who remembered which con that was from, but now I've lost his info.

As for AnimEigo, I'm as sentimental as any 90's vet--was on the Urusei Yatsura VHS-of-the-Month Club, and still try to pass the torch on to poor To-Love-Ru victims--but it's getting pretty sad:
The industry was already rocketing past Bob's garage before the bubble, and with the days of Funi, Viz, Sentai and Crunchyroll, it's like watching someone still trading fansubs by mail. Even the most loyal UY and OMG fan had to watch AnimEigo's licenses expire one by one, until we just had to accept that his company was now the house that Shogun Assassin built.
And now Bob's gotten so overconfident from the Bubblegum Crisis Kickstarter, he's announcing he's got two more series "in the works" for announcement, and asking us if we want SD on Blu-ray disk for $50-60. What, you mean like Discotek's Samurai Pizza Cats disk, then?
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Ejanss wrote:

Used to have this info on file, but lost it, so now I'll have to ask again:
Was Baycon or AnimeCon the one where they first showed that ten-minute opening film of The History of Anime set to Dvorak's New World Symphony (arguably the first AMV ever made)?
Been trying to track that down, and I found an old con geezer who remembered which con that was from, but now I've lost his info.

As for AnimEigo, I'm as sentimental as any 90's vet--was on the Urusei Yatsura VHS-of-the-Month Club, and still try to pass the torch on to poor To-Love-Ru victims--but it's getting pretty sad:
The industry was already rocketing past Bob's garage before the bubble, and with the days of Funi, Viz, Sentai and Crunchyroll, it's like watching someone still trading fansubs by mail. Even the most loyal UY and OMG fan had to watch AnimEigo's licenses expire one by one, until we just had to accept that his company was now the house that Shogun Assassin built.
And now Bob's gotten so overconfident from the Bubblegum Crisis Kickstarter, he's announcing he's got two more series "in the works" for announcement, and asking us if we want SD on Blu-ray disk for $50-60. What, you mean like Discotek's Samurai Pizza Cats disk, then?


I think that was shown at BayCon first, then AnimeCon later. I know I saw it at AnimeCon, but I think it had been shown before then. But it was almost 25 years ago, so I could very well be wrong.

As far as Woodhead...well, the dude was already pretty well off from that Wizardry money before he even hit the anime scene. He's pretty much always just put out stuff he likes; nobody who was actually looking to make the big bucks would have put out UY in the way they did. I loved that show and stopped following it after about 10 or 11 volumes. At this point, I'm not even sure what they still have rights to produce, though I'm sure I'd be there if they put out a fancy new version of Dagger of Kamui.
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Posted 6/1/15 , edited 6/1/15

imaginarycreatures wrote:


Ejanss wrote:

Used to have this info on file, but lost it, so now I'll have to ask again:
Was Baycon or AnimeCon the one where they first showed that ten-minute opening film of The History of Anime set to Dvorak's New World Symphony (arguably the first AMV ever made)?
Been trying to track that down, and I found an old con geezer who remembered which con that was from, but now I've lost his info.


I think that was shown at BayCon first, then AnimeCon later. I know I saw it at AnimeCon, but I think it had been shown before then. But it was almost 25 years ago, so I could very well be wrong.


(Somebody's got to know where still exists a copy of this--It deserves to be on YouTube for posterity, like the Daicon IV video and the ADV Do It Now ads.
Used to have it on bootleg tape with other AMV's, but that's been long since lost too.)


As far as Woodhead...well, the dude was already pretty well off from that Wizardry money before he even hit the anime scene. He's pretty much always just put out stuff he likes; nobody who was actually looking to make the big bucks would have put out UY in the way they did. I loved that show and stopped following it after about 10 or 11 volumes.


(What?? It was only just getting good at Vol. 10--Usually I just recommend new viewers ignore everything before Vol. 6, and just watch the recap special instead, it's less painful.)


At this point, I'm not even sure what they still have rights to produce, though I'm sure I'd be there if they put out a fancy new version of Dagger of Kamui.


From the sound of it, he may be trying to license a couple of new classics, like he promised to with Yawara, which may have sank the anime half of the company the first time.
If he can get something, he'll have to deliver to stay in a more competitive game now, but think he's just reliving glory days.
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Posted 6/3/15 , edited 6/3/15

imaginarycreatures wrote:


WOW!!! So much rich history! Dude, you're like a legend on here! I wonder if TheAncientOne was at the BayCon and AnimeCon as well, that's so cool that you were basically one of the first new generation of kids to get into anime.

I also find it awesome that your whole family was in on it, did you guys ever have like family anime marathon nights where your parents would bring back a series and you guys would all watch it together!?

And that shirt is pretty sweet, I bet that would cost a lot of money these days. Those are the OG shirts!

Also is your brother still into anime?
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Posted 6/3/15 , edited 6/3/15

LoomyTheBrew wrote:

WOW!!! So much rich history! Dude, you're like a legend on here! I wonder if TheAncientOne was at the BayCon and AnimeCon as well, that's so cool that you were basically one of the first new generation of kids to get into anime.

I also find it awesome that your whole family was in on it, did you guys ever have like family anime marathon nights where your parents would bring back a series and you guys would all watch it together!?

And that shirt is pretty sweet, I bet that would cost a lot of money these days. Those are the OG shirts!

Also is your brother still into anime?


I don't think Ancient was in this part of the country at the time, but I've never asked him; I suppose it's possible, though. He might have heard of my parent's store, since we advertised in sci-fi magazines and whatnot, and we were one of the few advertising anime at the time.

Truthfully, my parents weren't really super into anime. For them, it was mostly a business thing. They're more into science fiction and fantasy, particularly books. They would watch some of the more sci-fi type stuff, things like Akira, Gunbuster, Dirty Pair. Pretty much we'd watch stuff as it came out, since we had to know about the product, but I wouldn't call them "fans". Though there was one time I watched Urotsukidoji with my father on a Saturday afternoon...I have a pretty unusual family.

I think my dad liked DBZ, however, but that's closer to American comic books, which is really more his wheelhouse. I think he'd like Hunter x Hunter for similar reasons, but I'm loathe to recommend a 100+ episode series to a non-fan. I would recommend F/SN to my dad, but he'd really like the visual novel more, and I don't think he'd be willing to go through the technical hoopla to get it running in English.

My dad did come with me for a day to an anime convention in like 2005 or 2006, since he had business dealings with one of the dealers there. His big takeaways were that they'd gotten a lot bigger, there were a lot more women, the crowd was quite a bit younger, and that the anime that was popular had a lot more scantily-clad girls in it. All of which were pretty accurate assessments, really.

As far as my brother...it's kinda weird. He speaks more Japanese than me, and speaks it better, but that's because his partner speaks Japanese, and my mom's side of the family is half-Japanese, so he wanted to visit the country and learn more about the culture. He's not into anime, but he does watch it occasionally. He likes Miyazaki films, and I'm pretty sure he watched Attack on Titan.

But I'm really the only anime fan in my family, nowadays.

Related to the Kickstarter: I had to laugh at the stretch goal to translate the OVAs into Klingon.
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The kickstarter met its goal in 13.5 hours and made a new stretch goal for $55,000 and has already made that (currently at $59,000).
http://www.crunchyroll.com/anime-news/2015/06/03/animeigo-meets-otaku-no-video-kickstarter-goal-announces-riding-bean

Can Japan finally recognize the potential of the western market yet!?
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Posted 6/5/15

imaginarycreatures wrote:


LoomyTheBrew wrote:

WOW!!! So much rich history! Dude, you're like a legend on here! I wonder if TheAncientOne was at the BayCon and AnimeCon as well, that's so cool that you were basically one of the first new generation of kids to get into anime.

I also find it awesome that your whole family was in on it, did you guys ever have like family anime marathon nights where your parents would bring back a series and you guys would all watch it together!?

And that shirt is pretty sweet, I bet that would cost a lot of money these days. Those are the OG shirts!

Also is your brother still into anime?


I don't think Ancient was in this part of the country at the time, but I've never asked him; I suppose it's possible, though. He might have heard of my parent's store, since we advertised in sci-fi magazines and whatnot, and we were one of the few advertising anime at the time.

Truthfully, my parents weren't really super into anime. For them, it was mostly a business thing. They're more into science fiction and fantasy, particularly books. They would watch some of the more sci-fi type stuff, things like Akira, Gunbuster, Dirty Pair. Pretty much we'd watch stuff as it came out, since we had to know about the product, but I wouldn't call them "fans". Though there was one time I watched Urotsukidoji with my father on a Saturday afternoon...I have a pretty unusual family.

I think my dad liked DBZ, however, but that's closer to American comic books, which is really more his wheelhouse. I think he'd like Hunter x Hunter for similar reasons, but I'm loathe to recommend a 100+ episode series to a non-fan. I would recommend F/SN to my dad, but he'd really like the visual novel more, and I don't think he'd be willing to go through the technical hoopla to get it running in English.

My dad did come with me for a day to an anime convention in like 2005 or 2006, since he had business dealings with one of the dealers there. His big takeaways were that they'd gotten a lot bigger, there were a lot more women, the crowd was quite a bit younger, and that the anime that was popular had a lot more scantily-clad girls in it. All of which were pretty accurate assessments, really.

As far as my brother...it's kinda weird. He speaks more Japanese than me, and speaks it better, but that's because his partner speaks Japanese, and my mom's side of the family is half-Japanese, so he wanted to visit the country and learn more about the culture. He's not into anime, but he does watch it occasionally. He likes Miyazaki films, and I'm pretty sure he watched Attack on Titan.

But I'm really the only anime fan in my family, nowadays.

Related to the Kickstarter: I had to laugh at the stretch goal to translate the OVAs into Klingon.


Oh gotcha, so you're the real anime fan your fam. And haha, you watched Urotsukidoji with your dad!? XD I've watched plenty of weird shit with my parents too, like some of the more graphic GoT episodes and more Trust me, I know what you mean by "unusual" lmao!

Ah I see, so your dad and mom are more novel fans. Ya, that'd be great if F/SN had a legal english version so your dad could read it. Also, are your parents still running that store together or are they retired already?

Ah I gotcha, so you and your brother got Japanese blood in ya! Cool!

And ya, that'd be hilarious if they made that stretch goal so they'd have to do it hahahaha!!!
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Posted 6/5/15 , edited 6/5/15

imaginarycreatures wrote:

I don't think Ancient was in this part of the country at the time, but I've never asked him; I suppose it's possible, though..

Unfortunately, the furthest west I've been is west Texas, about 15 miles from the New Mexico border.

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