Should paramedics halt CPR due to "No CPR tattoos?"
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Posted 6/12/15 , edited 6/12/15

Take a look at these sweet tats everyone

These are people who do not believe in CPR or any other form of resuscitation. If you see them in cardiac arrest, please leave them there and do nothing. You're just supposed to go on your merry little way, when you see that tattoo... it means, "do not save my life. I wanna die." Yea... I don't know many people who would just say "Well, fuck CPR, he's got a tattoo"

Two questions... Should paramedics be forced to leave them due to such tattoo's? And if a paramedic decided to stop performing CPR for that reasons, should the paramedic be held responsible?

Another example would be.... let's say 911 was called after a man takes too many pills, and he tells the paramedics, "I wanna OD, leave me alone", should the paramedics just go home? What if someone claimed modern medical science is witchcraft. should we leave them dying on the ground cause they said so
Posted 6/12/15 , edited 6/12/15
I don't know why it should be any different than "do not resuscitate" instructions before surgery etc. If anything they should probably be exposed to liability for not following patients demands in this case or at least not be entitled to bill for unwanted services. The only thing they are doing by reviving people who don't want it is serving their own egos.
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Posted 6/12/15
Well it depends on your perspective.

*dons nerd glasses*

According to J.S. Mill's harm principle, the only reason for which government can legitimately exercise authority over an unwilling individual is to prevent them causing harm to another individual. This theory supposedly means that if people want to hurt themselves and it isn't posing a threat to anyone else then by all means they should be allowed to do so.

Personally I agree with this, and theoretically I would support the argument that a paramedic that abandoned an individual willing to die as in the scenario you suggested should not be prosecuted, and I personally don't agree with the view that 'human life is sacred' etc. that a lot of religious (and indeed non-religious) people subscribe to. However, I realise that in reality most people would ignore these tattoos out of a sense of moral duty and would be more likely to try to aid the individual, however unwilling they might be.

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sorry if this made me sound a bit soulless
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Posted 6/12/15

TheDustyForest wrote:

Well it depends on your perspective.

*dons nerd glasses*

According to J.S. Mill's harm principle, the only reason for which government can legitimately exercise authority over an unwilling individual is to prevent them causing harm to another individual. This theory supposedly means that if people want to hurt themselves and it isn't posing a threat to anyone else then by all means they should be allowed to do so.

Personally I agree with this, and theoretically I would support the argument that a paramedic that abandoned an individual willing to die as in the scenario you suggested should not be prosecuted, and I personally don't agree with the view that 'human life is sacred' etc. that a lot of religious (and indeed non-religious) people subscribe to. However, I realise that in reality most people would ignore these tattoos out of a sense of moral duty and would be more likely to try to aid the individual, however unwilling they might be.

---

sorry if this made me sound a bit soulless


Funny how the part I bolded doesn't apply to assisted suicide.
Posted 6/12/15
If only...
Posted 6/12/15
http://firstaid.about.com/od/medicallegal/f/Medical-Tattoos.htm

This article brings up good points. If you don't want to glance through the article then I'll just put a couple below.

- The tattoo could easily be a drunken mistake.

- They could have changed their mind since getting it.

- Paramedics don't really look for tattoos for that sort of thing.

- DNR requires a doctor's order and has rules to it. You can't just get a tattoo and have it be valid and I doubt any paramedic is going to take the time to look into it before saving someone.

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Posted 6/12/15 , edited 6/12/15

dotsforlife wrote:


TheDustyForest wrote:

Well it depends on your perspective.

*dons nerd glasses*

According to J.S. Mill's harm principle, the only reason for which government can legitimately exercise authority over an unwilling individual is to prevent them causing harm to another individual. This theory supposedly means that if people want to hurt themselves and it isn't posing a threat to anyone else then by all means they should be allowed to do so.

Personally I agree with this, and theoretically I would support the argument that a paramedic that abandoned an individual willing to die as in the scenario you suggested should not be prosecuted, and I personally don't agree with the view that 'human life is sacred' etc. that a lot of religious (and indeed non-religious) people subscribe to. However, I realise that in reality most people would ignore these tattoos out of a sense of moral duty and would be more likely to try to aid the individual, however unwilling they might be.

---

sorry if this made me sound a bit soulless


Funny how the part I bolded doesn't apply to assisted suicide.


you know what you're completely right

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Posted 6/12/15

nooneinparticular wrote:

I don't know why it should be any different than "do not resuscitate" instructions before surgery etc. If anything they should probably be exposed to liability for not following patients demands in this case or at least not be entitled to bill for unwanted services. The only thing they are doing by reviving people who don't want it is serving their own egos.


Yea... I agree about the whole freedom stuff. And I agree with the stuff about liability and not being entitled to pay for a bill... However, think about this psychologically.. Imagine what watching a person die who you could easilly save would do to the mind of a paramedic. Their job is to save lives, so I'm sure they're probably passionate about that... I could easilly see why a paramedic wouldn't comply... I don't think many people would have it in them to comply with it.
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