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You know when something affected you?
Posted 6/15/15 , edited 6/15/15

_MissTake_ wrote:


anzn wrote:

What are you referring to exactly? Didn't you look further down the thread? I corrected myself.
Or are you just being salty with me again


Wasn't much of a correction, was it?

1. You used "effected" as an adjective, not a verb.
2. No such adjective exists.
3. The verb "to effect" means to bring about or to make something happen, not to show the effects of something.
4. Your sentence, even in the "corrected" form, makes no sense.

I am not salty. I just dislike it when people who don't know what they're talking about act like they do and end up spreading the wrong information, in this case teaching people horrid grammar. That irks me quite a bit.

OT: The title question of this thread is wrong to begin with. If I'm understanding the thread author correctly, it should be "Do you know when something has affected you?" Well, that or "How do you get affected by some things?" *shrug* Either way, the word effect really has no purpose in this thread unless one is talking about the effects (n.) certain things have on them.
(Maybe you should fix it, lorreen?)


Ejanss wrote:

An affect is a sensation or change in condition, an effect is the result of a Cause.
The documentary emotionally affected me to take action, so I set about and effected a change in my community.

(And oops, "Fake/put-on" is affected. Told ya it was confusing.


Well, in this case, you used 'effect' as a verb meaning to make something happen, but thank you. Excellent example.

1. What in the world...? No I didn't??? Read it again.
"Leon is effected by the Plaga Parasite."
If I was using it as a adjective, I'd be describing something. What am I describing in the sentence?
2. Look at 1.
3. And that's what I was trying to do. Again, look at my reply to lorrenn. Specifically this part,

Indicating that eventually, the Plaga Parasite will take over & showing the effect. Then it can turn into an affect.
So I guess you use "effect" as both a present and future tense? Or something like that. Did that make sense?

4. Yes it does, you just didn't understand it.

Sorry boo boo, but you are being pretty salty rn. :/
I know what i'm talking about, I just have trouble describing/explaining stuff (especially words as well).

Also, I literally said it the same way except I didn't put both of them in one sentence.
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Posted 6/15/15 , edited 6/15/15

_MissTake_ wrote:
You just made it more confusing for people.... -_-
"Do you know when something has affected you? If so, what were the effects?"

Sorry, yeah I am that bad that writing (thanks for saying so)
but maybe more like this "When something has affected you do you know what the effects where or if they have happened?"
So I ask if you knew what that was affected upon you and what the effects where like in the first few comments.
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Posted 6/15/15
Maybe you should just start a thread on grammar. There seems to be an inordinate amount of interest in it.
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Posted 6/15/15

pirththee wrote:
There seems to be an inordinate amount of interest in it.

But thats the biggest invite to all grammer-nazi's
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Posted 6/15/15

Freddy96NO wrote:


pirththee wrote:
There seems to be an inordinate amount of interest in it.

But thats the biggest invite to all grammer-nazi's


it would seem the invitations have been sent and the party has started.
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Posted 6/15/15

pirththee wrote:
Freddy96NO wrote:
pirththee wrote:

it would seem the invitations have been sent and the party has started.

I am not paying for the food and drink!
Posted 6/15/15

anzn wrote:

1. No I didn't. lol Read it again.
"Leon is effected by the Plaga Parasite."
If I was using it as a adjective, I'd be describing something. What am I describing in the sentence?
2. Look at 1.
3. And that's what I was trying to do. Again, look at my reply to lorrenn.
4. Yes it does, you just didn't understand it.

Sorry boo boo, but you are being pretty salty rn. :/


*sigh* Stop acting like you know what you're talking about. Must I break this down for you? My ESL students can tell the difference better than you can, it seems. -_-

1. Leon is effected by the Plaga Parasite.
Subject = Leon
Verb= is
Complement= effected by the Plaga Parasite.
In this case, the complement is describing Leon's state of being.

2. One can tell that it is an adjective because it can easily be replaced by ANOTHER adjective.
For example: Leon is frightened by the Plaga Parasite.
Here, frightened is an adjective describing an emotion.

3. You were not using it that way, sorry. Not that meaning with that example, no. The verb "to effect" is always followed by a noun which acts as an object.
Example: The t-Virus will soon effect mutations on everyone who came in contact with it.
The verb 'effect' is followed by the noun 'mutations' which acts as an object. To double-check this, we can ask the question "what will the t-Virus effect?" The answer is "mutations," therefore, that's the object.

4. Your sentence makes no sense because you used 'effect' incorrectly. Now, if you replaced it with "affected," THEN it would make more sense.

You can tell yourself that I'm just salty all you want. It still wouldn't change that fact that your grammar is atrocious and you really should refrain from trying to teach people things you don't have any idea about.
Posted 6/15/15

Freddy96NO wrote:

I am not paying for the food and drink!


Ask for the thread be closed
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Posted 6/15/15

Freddy96NO wrote:


pirththee wrote:
Freddy96NO wrote:
pirththee wrote:

it would seem the invitations have been sent and the party has started.

I am not paying for the food and drink!

I don't know they're acting pretty bloodthirsty. I mean going for your jugular and all. Maybe they're vampire grammar Nazi's.They probably live in Europe or the UK because it's night there now.
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Posted 6/15/15

pirththee wrote:
I don't know they're acting pretty bloodthirsty. I mean going for your jugular and all. Maybe they're vampire grammar Nazi's.They probably live in Europe or the UK because it's night there now.

Not the Vampires *shrug* (they will force me to the Empire)
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Posted 6/15/15

severticas wrote:
Hey hey hey, UK is part of Europe xD

No they are not allowed in since they wanted to be out on thier island... alone... in the sea...
Posted 6/15/15

severticas wrote:

Ask for the thread be closed


That will probably be for the best. *nods*
Posted 6/15/15

_MissTake_ wrote:


severticas wrote:

Ask for the thread be closed


That will probably be for the best. *nods*


Are you sure?

I didn't mean it xD
Posted 6/15/15

severticas wrote:

Are you sure?

I didn't mean it xD


Yes. My bad habits are returning, it seems.
Posted 6/15/15 , edited 6/15/15

_MissTake_ wrote:


anzn wrote:

1. No I didn't. lol Read it again.
"Leon is effected by the Plaga Parasite."
If I was using it as a adjective, I'd be describing something. What am I describing in the sentence?
2. Look at 1.
3. And that's what I was trying to do. Again, look at my reply to lorrenn.
4. Yes it does, you just didn't understand it.

Sorry boo boo, but you are being pretty salty rn. :/


*sigh* Stop acting like you know what you're talking about. Must I break this down for you? My ESL students can tell the difference better than you can, it seems. -_-

1. Leon is effected by the Plaga Parasite.
Subject = Leon
Verb= is
Complement= effected by the Plaga Parasite.
In this case, the complement is describing Leon's state of being.

2. One can tell that it is an adjective because it can easily be replaced by ANOTHER adjective.
For example: Leon is frightened by the Plaga Parasite.
Here, frightened is an adjective describing an emotion.

3. You were not using it that way, sorry. Not that meaning with that example, no. The verb "to effect" is always followed by a noun which acts as an object.
Example: The t-Virus will soon effect mutations on everyone who came in contact with it.
The verb 'effect' is followed by the noun 'mutations' which acts as an object. To double-check this, we can ask the question "what will the t-Virus effect?" The answer is "mutations," therefore, that's the object.

4. Your sentence makes no sense because you used 'effect' incorrectly. Now, if you replaced it with "affected," THEN it would make more sense.

You can tell yourself that I'm just salty all you want. It still wouldn't change that fact that your grammar is atrocious and you really should refrain from trying to teach people things you don't have any idea about.

OKOKOK but I'm not reading all that.
I see what I did wrong.
I should of said something like, "the effect of being affected by the plaga parasite injected into Leon is mind control"
my bad.
now you can stop the saltiness now.
I'm sorry a teenager over the internet on a forum irks you so much :/
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