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Post Reply Corporations using kickstarter
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33 / M / Florida
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Posted 6/22/15
I'm surprised that no one mentioned how the project could gain the $2 million dollars and collapse. This results in leaving the companies with the money and the supporters with nothing.
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39 / Inside your compu...
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Posted 6/22/15
Consumers would simply vote with their support or nonsupport, so I don't see a problem.
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20 / M / Sweden
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Posted 6/22/15

nanikore2 wrote:

Consumers would simply vote with their support or nonsupport, so I don't see a problem.


The problem whit that is that is that there are other ways you can vote whit your wallet. For instance they could have released the old classics for PS4 and say something like "if this is successful then we might make a squeal". They wouldn't even have to do much work since they can just import the old assets to a new engine and release it. Then we also have the fact that companies may try to abuse the system (I'm looking at you Ubisoft)


Bullbound wrote:

I'm surprised that no one mentioned how the project could gain the $2 million dollars and collapse. This results in leaving the companies with the money and the supporters with nothing.


the what crash...? No cash has been sent over to Sony, Sega and the developers yet since they get transferred once the project reaches it's end date and time. What crashed was Kickstarters servers since too many people tried to access the site at once, noting more noting less happened to my knowledge.
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35 / THE OC
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Posted 6/22/15
the only reason i made a kickstarter account was because i heard a rumor the yu suzuki was going to use it to create shenmue III about 3 years ago! so when they announced it at E3 i was throwing my money at him!! to bad i'm currently unemployed or i would have given the 500 dollar pledge!! PS Sony is not using kickstarter to fund the game more like gauge reaction! the first Shenmue on dreamcast cost over 47 million to make so no way in hell 2 million will cover cost of game on PC and PS4!!
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33 / M / Florida
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Posted 6/22/15

TheOmegaForce70941 wrote:

Bullbound wrote:

I'm surprised that no one mentioned how the project could gain the $2 million dollars and collapse. This results in leaving the companies with the money and the supporters with nothing.


the what crash...? No cash has been sent over to Sony, Sega and the developers yet since they get transferred once the project reaches it's end date and time. What crashed was Kickstarters servers since too many people tried to access the site at once, noting more noting less happened to my knowledge.

With any project on Kickstarter, the person/company asking for the funds does not have to complete the project. While the game is popular, there is no guarantee that all of the capital needed will be raised. If for some reason there is a problem with production of the game that results in it not being completed, that $2 million is not refunded. Some companies have been asked to leave Kickstarter because they put together a project(s), fake progress reports, keep the money from the backers, and then don't deliver the product. Sony could very easily collect the money and use it for something else, then cancel the game.
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Posted 6/22/15 , edited 6/22/15

kourgath wrote:So I don't know why you said "Except that those who show interest are now obligated to buy it once it's actually released." since you have already bought the game once you have pledged and the game has successfully met its goal. Honestly the general idea behind this is almost the same as pre-orders with one difference being that they need to reach a certain monetary goal before they can really start making the game. The other difference being that you may never get a game (or whatever the product is).


The very, very first Kickstarter I can ever remember was when the makers of the movie Koyaanisqatsi offered a $100 private DVD-R as incentive to raise charity funds to pay off the lawsuit that was keeping the movie in limbo, which would award them the rights back again, and it could come back out on regular disk again.
You weren't "buying the disk", you were making a donation that would help them finish an unfinished project, and if you wanted the movie on disk at all, private or commercial, everybody had to pitch in.

The second "Sales interest survey" was when fans were nagging Disney to work out the tangled DVD rights for Princess Mononoke--Toho didn't have their own DVD release, and Disney was forced to make their DVD dub-only, but since the movie had done so much worse than they expected, they arrogantly called the fans' "petition" bluff and commissioned a snail-mail petition-survey of how many people would want a bilingual DVD--However, any participants had to say that they were committed to buying the disk once it was released.
In other words, put up or shut up, and back when they had plans to quietly drop all Ghibli in the US, they were quietly hoping for the latter.
(As it turned out, they were in for a surprise.)

Kickstarter is so much becoming the Flavor of the Month, companies are starting to lose the distinction between "Charity begins at home" and "Put up or shut up". One gets more donations than the other.
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Posted 6/22/15
I guess it's not too bad but it does strike me as a strange thing for a large corporation to do. Kickstarter is for small startup stuff. It is not a survey replacement.
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27 / M / Louisville, KY
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Posted 6/22/15 , edited 6/22/15
I don't like companies redirecting the risk toward the customers. Rather than the company itself taking a financial risk, they put that risk on the customer and if things don't go well, then at least they got paid. It's not ethical for companies with plenty of resources to place some risk themselves. It's like pre-ordering a game, but in this case, you don't know what the game will be like or if it will even launch. If it doesn't launch the company loses nothing but time. Even then, thanks to the kick-starter they got paid for that time.
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Posted 6/22/15
According to the rules you cant back your own project, since Sony is backing it would it make a violation of the rules? That was lame I mean an E3 just for showing a guy on stage and asking for money for the project, that was the board of directors that wanted no risk at a new game launch, vide game industry was launched vas made with risk not with safe moves
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16 / M / Ente Isla
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Posted 6/22/15 , edited 6/22/15
Its purpose is as clear as day -- that is, a grab at cash so that they don't have to spend money to make the game. If people donate enough then they can make it and if they don't they can argue that there "wasn't enough interest in the project". Soon enough we'll be seeing AAA games flood the market and the consumer will not only be paying for the game but for the game to be developed as well.

Kickstarter, assuming this method continues to work on gamers, will be full of so many games from large businesses that it'll be nigh impossible for Indie developers or smaller companies to get the money that they actually NEED to create their next project.

EDIT: Jim Sterling shares my sentiment.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXqrYx-04Ok
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48 / M / New England, USA
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Posted 6/22/15
If a game I enjoy is potentially getting a sequel (thanks to Kickstarter, Indiegogo or some other crowdfunding platform) I obviously wouldn't see otherwise, I don't care if it's Sega,Sony, Microsoft or Captain Clucky's Chicken Shack putting it up; I'm pledging .
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F / You, Knighted States
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Posted 6/22/15
I find it complete and utter BS that a huge corp like Sony is soliciting on Kickstarter.
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Posted 6/22/15 , edited 6/22/15

kourgath wrote:

I might be misinterpreting what you said and if I am then I apologize before hand. But you do not have to buy the game after release if you pledge at least $29 to the project. Sure if you go with the $5 tier once the game is out then you will have to go out and buy it but that is the same as when indie devs offer a $1 tier. Hell when the game comes out it will probably cost $60 like most new AAA games for $29 you get the game roughly half off.

So for $5 you get:
  • Yu Suzuki's thanks and praise. (whatever that is good for)
  • Be able to participate in surveys and vote in polls for the ideas you want to see in the game.


For $29 you get:
  • Digital copy of Shenmue 3 for PC or PS4.
  • Includes the $5 Reward.


So I don't know why you said "Except that those who show interest are now obligated to buy it once it's actually released." since you have already bought the game once you have pledged and the game has successfully met its goal. Honestly the general idea behind this is almost the same as pre-orders with one difference being that they need to reach a certain monetary goal before they can really start making the game. The other difference being that you may never get a game (or whatever the product is).


The principal dilemma for consumers that I'm seeing lies in two things. Without a guarantee for a completed product there's no incentive to invest in the crowd fund's upper tier, and considering the lower tier reward (being able to offer one's input on product content through polling data and communications sent to the firm in question) is essentially affording the consumer tools they bear regardless I can't see why anyone would even invest in that.

Assuming consumers are rational actors it's in the consumer's interest to call a firm's bluff, not pay for either tier, and submit feedback on whether and how a product should be made through conventional channels regardless. The firm's only means of recourse would be to either disregard all feedback given through channels other than the crowd fund's investors or to simply stop making public announcements about upcoming and prospective projects, and neither really seems rational.

As a means for reducing the impact of operating costs involved in producing, marketing, and distributing a product it makes sense to me that firms would turn to crowd funding. As a means for testing markets by establishing a prospective minimum profit ratio prior to any large-scale investments (which seems to be the aim here) it seems like sound theory, but in practice the above dilemmas would probably distort the demand figures to the point that they wouldn't really reflect anything more than the amount of irrational actors in the market.

What do you think?
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29 / M / Atlanta, GA, USA
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Posted 6/22/15
It makes sense for every company to use crowdfunding, not just the poor ones. It can bring in a staggering amount of investment money. A proven company proposing a sequel to a popular game will be very good at it, especially if they start dropping collector's items as rewards for pledging.
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Posted 6/22/15 , edited 6/22/15

Kavalion wrote:

It makes sense for every company to use crowdfunding, not just the poor ones. It can bring in a staggering amount of investment money. A proven company proposing a sequel to a popular game will be very good at it, especially if they start dropping collector's items as rewards for pledging.


Big companies have their own form of user-participant Kickstarting to raise development capital, it's called STOCK INVESTMENT.

It's the little private companies that don't.
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