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Post Reply Rhetorical Question: Why isn't the number 11 pronounced onety one?
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Posted 6/30/15 , edited 6/30/15

Posted 6/30/15
Oh come on, you can't have rhetorical questions of any kind as a forum topic. What are we meant to talk about now.
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Posted 6/30/15 , edited 6/30/15
Old English endleofon, from the base of one + a second element (probably expressing the sense ‘left over’) occurring also in twelve; of Germanic origin and related to Dutch and German elf .
courtesy of google.

also
http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/7281/why-do-eleven-and-twelve-get-unique-words-and-not-end-in-teen
not going to read all of it.
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Posted 6/30/15

Nobodyofimportance wrote:

Old English endleofon, from the base of one + a second element (probably expressing the sense ‘left over’) occurring also in twelve; of Germanic origin and related to Dutch and German elf .
courtesy of google.

also
http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/7281/why-do-eleven-and-twelve-get-unique-words-and-not-end-in-teen
not going to read all of it.



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Posted 6/30/15
wow.
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54 / M / Tacoma, WA. wind...
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Posted 6/30/15
I thought it should be oneteen and twoteen.....
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Posted 6/30/15

GrateSaiyaman wrote:

I thought it should be oneteen and twoteen.....


but Eleven and Twelve sound much better.Owo
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Posted 6/30/15
As someone pointed out it is from the Germanic roots in English it is actually much better than the Latin which is undecim since decem is ten unus is one they combined the two words to get that gets worse six in Latin is sex go figure that one out.
Posted 6/30/15
Someone make a petition to make the correct pronunciation of 11 to onety-one
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Posted 6/30/15

Nobodyofimportance wrote:of Germanic origin and related to Dutch and German elf .


I'm not sure where you've heard that. There isn't any connection, so far as I've seen in any credible works, between elf and the origin of our eleven and twelve. As you pointed out, those words more likely stem from a word for left-over - in this case, the Proto-Germanic *lif. The Proto-Germanic word for elf was albiz.
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Posted 6/30/15 , edited 6/30/15
As it has been said it probably has something to do with German. In German 11 is pronounced "Elf" and 12 is pronounced "Zwelf". Hence "Eleven" and "Twelve". Though the similarities are not glaring it was probably very close in old English.

Granted I am not 100% sure, so if I am wrong just point it out to me.
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Posted 7/1/15
Just a guess on my part, but the fact that eleven and twelve are "special" in both English and German (and perhaps other languages) may be related to the fact that 12 is such a commonly used subdivision in various measurement systems (inches in a foot, seconds in a minute, minutes in an hour, etc.). But I don't know what caused what.
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Posted 7/1/15
Eleven

"el" even

Two even l's

11

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Posted 7/1/15
Rhetorical so there isn't really a purpose to this thread...unless you actually wanted to know, in which case google or a book would be easier.
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Posted 7/1/15 , edited 7/1/15

Schmooples wrote:


Nobodyofimportance wrote:of Germanic origin and related to Dutch and German elf .


I'm not sure where you've heard that. There isn't any connection, so far as I've seen in any credible works, between elf and the origin of our eleven and twelve. As you pointed out, those words more likely stem from a word for left-over - in this case, the Proto-Germanic *lif. The Proto-Germanic word for elf was albiz.


i just googled "eleven definition" and copy-pasted the etymology bit.
I have no idea where they got that from.


eleven (n.) Look up eleven at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, elleovene, from Old English enleofan, endleofan, literally "one left" (over ten), from Proto-Germanic *ainlif- (compare Old Saxon elleban, Old Frisian andlova, Dutch elf, Old High German einlif, German elf, Old Norse ellifu, Gothic ainlif), a compound of *ain "one" (see one) + PIE *leikw- "leave, remain" (source of Greek leipein "to leave behind;" see relinquish).

FIREFLY: Give me a number from 1 to 10.
CHICOLINI: eleven!
FIREFLY: Right!

Viking survivors who escaped an Anglo-Saxon victory were daroþa laf "the leavings of spears," while hamora laf "the leavings of hammers" was an Old English kenning for "swords" (both from "The Battle of Brunanburgh"). Twelve reflects the same formation. Outside Germanic the only instance of this formation is in Lithuanian, which uses -lika "left over" and continues the series to 19 (vienio-lika "eleven," dvy-lika "twelve," try-lika "thirteen," keturio-lika "fourteen," etc.). Meaning "a team or side" in cricket or football is from 1743.


is from
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=eleven
I can't verify the accuracy of any of the content. But this also says say Dutch and German elf.
They have some sources there, if you like.

Also
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Proto-Germanic/ainalif
It's all over the place.
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