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Post Reply Is powerpoint a terrible tool for presentations?
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It doesn't matter.
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Posted 7/6/15
I've done better without.
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 7/6/15
I cringe whenever the instructor decides to share the lecture notes as power point files
(which requires you to install/use the bloated and slow powerpoint viewer) instead of
simply sharing the notes as a pdf file (which can be opened by a lightweight pdf reader
(=anything but adobe)
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M
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Posted 7/6/15
I remember in college I had found a better tool that was much more simple. Just use an image editor and it would throw the images up on the screen. Made an awesome presentation with it. A shame the professor counted that as a 0 because it wasn't in power point. Because the college had a contract to use power point. (It was a course on public speaking).
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Posted 7/6/15

namealreadytaken wrote:

I cringe whenever the instructor decides to share the lecture notes as power point files
(which requires you to install/use the bloated and slow powerpoint viewer) instead of
simply sharing the notes as a pdf file (which can be opened by a lightweight pdf reader
(=anything but adobe)


On the one hand, pdfs are hard to disassemble. On the other, powerpoints are easy disassemble. Extracting bit you need from a powerpoint file is much easier than your run of the mill pdf.
Posted 7/6/15 , edited 7/6/15
Yes.

Use prezi
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M
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Posted 7/6/15

DasWood wrote:


namealreadytaken wrote:

I cringe whenever the instructor decides to share the lecture notes as power point files
(which requires you to install/use the bloated and slow powerpoint viewer) instead of
simply sharing the notes as a pdf file (which can be opened by a lightweight pdf reader
(=anything but adobe)


On the one hand, pdfs are hard to disassemble. On the other, powerpoints are easy disassemble. Extracting bit you need from a powerpoint file is much easier than your run of the mill pdf.


Yes, PowerPoint is fairly easy to create for and re-use pieces of, since it can work easily with the other Office products. PDF creation is a little more roundabout, and can require its own licenses.
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22 / M / Fraxinus
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Posted 7/6/15
In the last powerpoint presentation I had to do, it was an oral assessment and some of the other groups literally had walls of text in just one slide, and did nothing more than just read from the slides. Just keeping the face to the computer, or board, not looking at the audience and reading, most of them in a pretty monotonous tone.

I can't be the only one who had lecturers/teachers who repeatedly told us not to just parrot off what you may or may not have just copied and pasted off the internet. When it came to my group's turn, and my turn to speak, I literally just had bullet points one one slide to remind myself of the points I had to talk about.

A powerpoint should never have every last bit of information you want to say out loud, otherwise there's really no point.

I'll agree that it's probably not the best tool, but I'll also have to say that it probably has a lot to do with people utilising it horribly.
Posted 7/6/15
but I like the pretty animations you can do.
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Posted 7/6/15
It's not terrible. There are other options but PP is very easy to use and fulfills it's purpose well enough.

You can use a PPT to PDF converter if you like.
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30 / M
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Posted 7/6/15
Used properly, it's a great tool for whipping up a presentation in a matter of minutes. PowerPoint's chief flaw is that it also makes it very easy to make very bad presentations. Everyone's seen someone try to give a presentation with walls-of-text, poor color contrast, and endless over-the-top animations between slides (and even paragraphs.. ugh).
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35 / M / Staten Island, NY...
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Posted 7/6/15 , edited 7/6/15

namealreadytaken wrote:

I cringe whenever the instructor decides to share the lecture notes as power point files
(which requires you to install/use the bloated and slow powerpoint viewer) instead of
simply sharing the notes as a pdf file (which can be opened by a lightweight pdf reader
(=anything but adobe)



Interesting...
I always make my second exam an open book test, letting my students use anything but their neighbor's paper. That exam covers 5-6 chapters. I always get about a quarter of them, who combine my PowerPoint slides into one file, and "Control F" their way to victory in the multiple choice section.

Than again, I teach at a college where all of the students get Microsoft Office for free for both Mac and PC.

.
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Posted 7/6/15
I've only used Power Point throughout my time at university and I never got anything but top marks for my presentations. I've also seen students who spent tons of time on how the presentation looked and sounded, using video or any other number of presentation tools, and still get bottom marks.

Why?

Because a shit presentation is a shit presentation regardless of what tool you use. I only use Power Point because it's an easy tool to use to help the listener (that's what they are not, not readers) to structure and remember the information you speak. If I put a graph in a presentation then it's only a visual aid to help the audience understand what is I'm saying. I don't try to explain the graph, the graph helps explain me, what I'm saying. If I put text in a presentation then it's to give them something to relate to later. The only time I look at my presentation directly instead of the audience, it's when I need to point something out with my handy pointing stick.
"Blah, blah, blah, illustrated here *point with stick then turn back to the audience* blah, blah, blah."

I never use fancy animations unless they serve a point, I don't fill the slides with text, I don't put in whacky soundeffects. My primary tool when presenting something... is me. Everything else is just there for backup. And I've had industry people tell me:
"Damn... your product is awful but after that presentation, I'd buy it anyway."

So no, I really don't think Power Point is a bad tool. And if you get hung up on that, chances are you need to rethink your presentation anyway.
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M / Houston, Tx
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Posted 7/6/15
I think it's a bit out-dated.
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M / Earth
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Posted 7/6/15
It all depends on how they're presenting the PowerPoint.
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Posted 7/6/15 , edited 7/6/15
I think powerpoint is an effective tool for those who know how to use it effectively. I think many use powerpoint has a clutch such as reading word for word or teaches "directly" from it which leads to a disengage class. The teacher's clearly is at fault for being an ineffective teacher; yet, expects the students to think they gave the best lecture ever. I wonder if those end of the year survey about how good was teacher does anything because I am brutally honest sometimes.

When I use powerpoint to give a presentation such as classroom presentation, then I will ask indirect questions to involve the audience such as, "Which of the two do you think is more effective?" Waits for classroom responses then transition to the next slide and say, "Let's find out."

If it is for work, then I present it simplified as possible with a verbal walk through. That is all.
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