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Post Reply Cultural Isolation and the Anime/Gaming Fandom.
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Posted 7/13/15

megahobbit wrote:


papagolfwhiskey wrote:


megahobbit wrote:

The amount of people who dont even know the heroes journey baffle me.


To be fair I couldn't recite the steps.



Yeah though there are different versions floating around. You should at least know the concept.


That I do.

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Posted 7/13/15
Some people just dont have much luck with having a broader range or their broader range is just rare to even find someone of similar interests. I tried to broaden my range of topics in school when i started working on conquering my shyness but most of the stuff i just didnt enjoy. About the only things ive managed to expand to and enjoy is mythology and martial arts which are quite difficult to find someone you can actually have an in depth conversation with about. For some the narrow range may just not be by choice but in the long run id say it comes down to how someone handles that narrow range.
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Posted 7/13/15



I get the sentiment (and I had to go to sleep as well, which is why I waited a day to respond, for I was busy). I think we've been misunderstanding each other slightly, having reviewed our conversation.

I guess for me, I see the inherent value in expanding one's knowledge, which is what you seem to be getting at here. If you understand the roots of where something came from or how to make connections to other things, that inherently can increase the enjoyment and understanding of what you like. If this is the point you are attempting to make, then I agree wholeheartedly.

I initially went into this making the argument that someone doesn't need to be an expert in multiple fields or dedicate the same amount of time and effort to understand everything in order to get the most out of life. In truth, plunging into a single subject and seeing where it takes you deserves intellectual valor and recognition in itself. A scientist studying quantum mechanics will be, in no means, will be an expert in astronomy, and this is fine. To this point, I still stand firm on.

Naturally, however, if there isn't an inherent understanding as to where something came from and how things influenced it, then one cannot claim to have an intellectual depth in that field, which means connections must be made (ie understanding the history of American cartoons, for example, dates back to when they were merely intermission shows for movies -- the very reason why Loony Toons exists at all -- until Walt Disney created the first animated film, Snow White. In this case, the movie industry brought about the beginning of the American animation industry). This also proves true in my previous analogy: a scientist studying quantum mechanics may be inspired to have an understanding of astronomy to one day connect the two fields, assuming we do significantly someday.

In this argument, i do agree wholeheartedly, although I was not aware of this point in the initial argument; I do believe the argument did grow and evolve over this discussion, which is why we are here now.

...

(As for the gaming statistic, I've taken a statistics course, so I'm not going to believe that statistic immediately considering how large that number is and how the media manipulates statistics. Firstly, I need a source, but even with that, it depends on what the experimenter defines a "game" as as well as how they conducted their research, was the survey done in person, on the phone, voluntarily, etc, as well as if there is any inherent bias to the survey that could skew the results. I'm not even aware of the population they took the survey from or how many people they surveyed because a couple hundred people cannot represent an entire country statistically. They could be counting random phone games as "games", which could be the reason behind why the number is so high as well.

In other words, I don't trust statistics without definite, detailed proof.)
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Posted 7/13/15 , edited 7/13/15

Nightblade370 wrote:
I get the sentiment (and I had to go to sleep as well, which is why I waited a day to respond, for I was busy). I think we've been misunderstanding each other slightly, having reviewed our conversation.

I guess for me, I see the inherent value in expanding one's knowledge, which is what you seem to be getting at here. If you understand the roots of where something came from or how to make connections to other things, that inherently can increase the enjoyment and understanding of what you like. If this is the point you are attempting to make, then I agree wholeheartedly.

I initially went into this making the argument that someone doesn't need to be an expert in multiple fields or dedicate the same amount of time and effort to understand everything in order to get the most out of life. In truth, plunging into a single subject and seeing where it takes you deserves intellectual valor and recognition in itself. A scientist studying quantum mechanics will be, in no means, will be an expert in astronomy, and this is fine. To this point, I still stand firm on.

Naturally, however, if there isn't an inherent understanding as to where something came from and how things influenced it, then one cannot claim to have an intellectual depth in that field, which means connections must be made (ie understanding the history of American cartoons, for example, dates back to when they were merely intermission shows for movies -- the very reason why Loony Toons exists at all -- until Walt Disney created the first animated film, Snow White. In this case, the movie industry brought about the beginning of the American animation industry). This also proves true in my previous analogy: a scientist studying quantum mechanics may be inspired to have an understanding of astronomy to one day connect the two fields, assuming we do significantly someday.

In this argument, i do agree wholeheartedly, although I was not aware of this point in the initial argument; I do believe the argument did grow and evolve over this discussion, which is why we are here now.

...

(As for the gaming statistic, I've taken a statistics course, so I'm not going to believe that statistic immediately considering how large that number is and how the media manipulates statistics. Firstly, I need a source, but even with that, it depends on what the experimenter defines a "game" as as well as how they conducted their research, was the survey done in person, on the phone, voluntarily, etc, as well as if there is any inherent bias to the survey that could skew the results. I'm not even aware of the population they took the survey from or how many people they surveyed because a couple hundred people cannot represent an entire country statistically. They could be counting random phone games as "games", which could be the reason behind why the number is so high as well.

In other words, I don't trust statistics without definite, detailed proof.)


Okay glad we reached a conclusion. There is a misunderstanding here in that I never meant my original post as an argument just a collection of thoughts I had that I threw out to spark discussion.

Statistics
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=5817835 .
I dont really base my argument solely on statistics though. I go to highschool and every single male kid here and about half the female kids play videogames. No exceptions. Also I do think random phone games are games just bad ones. I get the idea of "nobody likes the games I likes" but thats not "nobody plays games" your 18 how many kids at your highschool played games?

As for the LPers cable channel comparision. The biggest US cable channel USA network averages about 2,680,000 PewdiePies average amount of views on his channel is about 12,242,066. Know alot of factors come down on this such as PewDiePies fanbase being worldwide instead of USA Networks US fanbase. But my point still stands that this shit is more powerful than even cable networks now its just that the older generation doesnt acknowledge it.
http://www.stateofthemedia.org/2012/cable-cnn-ends-its-ratings-slide-fox-falls-again/cable-by-the-numbers/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_television_in_the_United_States
http://www.statsheep.com/pewdiepie
http://vidstatsx.com/PewDiePie/youtube-channel

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Posted 7/13/15 , edited 7/13/15

megahobbit wrote:


Nightblade370 wrote:
I get the sentiment (and I had to go to sleep as well, which is why I waited a day to respond, for I was busy). I think we've been misunderstanding each other slightly, having reviewed our conversation.

I guess for me, I see the inherent value in expanding one's knowledge, which is what you seem to be getting at here. If you understand the roots of where something came from or how to make connections to other things, that inherently can increase the enjoyment and understanding of what you like. If this is the point you are attempting to make, then I agree wholeheartedly.

I initially went into this making the argument that someone doesn't need to be an expert in multiple fields or dedicate the same amount of time and effort to understand everything in order to get the most out of life. In truth, plunging into a single subject and seeing where it takes you deserves intellectual valor and recognition in itself. A scientist studying quantum mechanics will be, in no means, will be an expert in astronomy, and this is fine. To this point, I still stand firm on.

Naturally, however, if there isn't an inherent understanding as to where something came from and how things influenced it, then one cannot claim to have an intellectual depth in that field, which means connections must be made (ie understanding the history of American cartoons, for example, dates back to when they were merely intermission shows for movies -- the very reason why Loony Toons exists at all -- until Walt Disney created the first animated film, Snow White. In this case, the movie industry brought about the beginning of the American animation industry). This also proves true in my previous analogy: a scientist studying quantum mechanics may be inspired to have an understanding of astronomy to one day connect the two fields, assuming we do significantly someday.

In this argument, i do agree wholeheartedly, although I was not aware of this point in the initial argument; I do believe the argument did grow and evolve over this discussion, which is why we are here now.

...

(As for the gaming statistic, I've taken a statistics course, so I'm not going to believe that statistic immediately considering how large that number is and how the media manipulates statistics. Firstly, I need a source, but even with that, it depends on what the experimenter defines a "game" as as well as how they conducted their research, was the survey done in person, on the phone, voluntarily, etc, as well as if there is any inherent bias to the survey that could skew the results. I'm not even aware of the population they took the survey from or how many people they surveyed because a couple hundred people cannot represent an entire country statistically. They could be counting random phone games as "games", which could be the reason behind why the number is so high as well.

In other words, I don't trust statistics without definite, detailed proof.)


Okay glad we reached a conclusion. There is a misunderstanding here in that I never meant my original post as an argument just a collection of thoughts I had that I threw out to spark discussion.

Statistics
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=5817835 .
I dont really base my argument solely on statistics though. I go to highschool and every single male kid here and about half the female kids play videogames. No exceptions. Also I do think random phone games are games just bad ones

As for the LPers cable channel comparision. The biggest US cable channel USA network averages about 2,680,000 PewdiePies average amount of views on his channel is about 12,242,066. Know alot of factors come down on this such as PewDiePies fanbase being worldwide instead of USA Networks US fanbase. But my point still stands that this shit is more powerful than even cable networks now its just that the older generation doesnt acknowledge it.
http://www.stateofthemedia.org/2012/cable-cnn-ends-its-ratings-slide-fox-falls-again/cable-by-the-numbers/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_television_in_the_United_States
http://www.statsheep.com/pewdiepie
http://vidstatsx.com/PewDiePie/youtube-channel



I guess my definition of a gamer and gaming is a bit more narrow, after all, so that's logical enough. I will say though that I don't really take anecdotes as evidence, but thanks for the link.

Actually, if you are familiar with GameTheory, PewDiePie's success isn't from his content entirely, ironically. In fact, it is more related to the fact that he speaks English and records in a foreign country. These videos go into detail with that as well as explains how YouTube works in a way that benefits certain YouTube users

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgMqhEMhVV8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLJQ0gFHM8s

(This isn't meant as a counterargument, but these videos, rather, are just something curious I stumbled upon one day. They are very well researched as well).

P.S. If we tangent anymore, we might get in trouble with the mods, so I'll stop here. Good chat, though.
Posted 7/14/15

megahobbit wrote:

Alright im in one of my more cerebral moods so I though I would just throw out some thoughts that have had about the anime/gaming fandom as of late.

I see a problem with both the anime and gaming fandoms in that many people in them are so dead set on refusing to try new things and have a lack of understanding culturally. For example I see alot of people who exclusively listen to anime/gaming OSTs and keep this as there sole musical intake never venturing or exploring other types of music. Or anime/manga fans being unable to connect or talk with people about anything outside of there fandom so much so that they have little contact with other people socially. Like on the Chit-Chat forums you see alot of lonely people who try and use the internet to connect with people who hold similar interests cause they self admittedly have no friends or social life. I read a article recently that said banality of topics is one of the reasons people finds a person boring and frankly if you can only talk about one hobby your a pretty shallow person. So many anime/gaming fans seem unwilling to try new things or expand there interests or develop a robust skill set.

Overall I think this is a problem. I may be grasping at straws and stereotyping a lot of people here so what do you guys think?

Edit: To clarify since alot of people are getting this wrong ITS NOT WHAT YOU LIKE THAT IS THE PROBLEM BUT BEING TO INVESTED IN IT TOO MUCH IN LIEU OF HAVING A BROADER RANGE OF TOPICS. SECONDLY ANIME/MANGA NOT BEING SOCIALLY ACCEPTABLE HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THIS VERY LITTLE OF WHAT I LIKE IS SOCIALLY ACCEPTABLE. What im talking about can affect anyone with any hobby but I see it occur the most in the Anime/gaming fandom

The point im trying to make is that even if you dont like society retreating into a hobby is not the proper reaction. Working to change society is.


Agreed. It took me a long time to open up to other things and after doing that, life became a whole lot more fun and the world became a bigger place. This lead to me being able to communicate better with those around me ( on and off line)
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Posted 7/14/15
It's not a problem if it's a choice people make.
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