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Post Reply Do you think people is becoming cold hearted as time passes by?
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Posted 7/21/15

VZ68 wrote:

Name the last time you've talked to a stranger in the check out line, instead of staring at your own smartphone and or texting someone.



You're assuming that we're all fiddling with a phone in line.
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Posted 7/21/15

tkayt wrote:


VZ68 wrote:

Name the last time you've talked to a stranger in the check out line, instead of staring at your own smartphone and or texting someone.



You're assuming that we're all fiddling with a phone in line.


Good chance of it happening.

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Posted 7/21/15
I personally believe that these large-scale changes in behavior – most notably increases in passive-aggressiveness – are a direct result of a growing lack of privacy. More and more web sites are keyed to your real-world identity, everybody around you has a camera in their phone, etc. You are constantly being watched, and this means that you have little or no "safe space" in your life, increasing personal stress, which reduces empathy for others. After all, those same "others" could be listening in on your secrets.

It's very 1984, except it's not the government that's oppressing you. It's a combination of "big data" corporations and the anonymous blob of people around you.
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Posted 7/21/15
People have replace person to person relationships with an electronic interface.

Even if people spend more time communicating, the personal interaction is missing. This damages the long-term bonds and emotional connections we could be developing in a more genuine relationship.

Sadly, the days of the Grange Hall went away with the advent of television.
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Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15


VZ68 wrote:

Name the last time you've talked to a stranger in the check out line, instead of staring at your own smartphone and or texting someone.



Yesterday.

I don't own a smartphone.
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Posted 7/21/15

Dariamus wrote:



VZ68 wrote:

Name the last time you've talked to a stranger in the check out line, instead of staring at your own smartphone and or texting someone.



Yesterday.

I don't own a smartphone.


was it a nice chat?

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Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15

VZ68 wrote:

was it a nice chat?



She mistook me for her friend and said something embarrassing. We laughed over it and went our separate ways.

Two weeks before that I spent almost an hour talking to the two strangers standing next to me while waiting in line for a book signing.


Sogno- 
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Posted 7/21/15
i've become less caring as time has passed by but it has little to do with technology

if anything people are more able to show how self-absorbed they are. that's always been a thing but now it's a lot easier to tell
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Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15

Dariamus wrote:

People have replace person to person relationships with an electronic interface.

Even if people spend more time communicating, the personal interaction is missing. This damages the long-term bonds and emotional connections we could be developing in a more genuine relationship.

Sadly, the days of the Grange Hall went away with the advent of television.


I personally don't see issue with it. The friends I made in high school were just there until we went away to college, as opposed to my friends online that I speak with on Skype call nearly everyday, text and even sometimes call on my phone. They have been there for me for almost 7+ years now. They're more genuine then the friends I had offline. Electronic interfaces do not prevent long term bonding or emotional connections (Lord knows I've called a couple of my friends when having an emotional breakdown). I assure you however, despite the arguments sometimes, that my relationships online are more genuine than some people's offline relationships. When you can lend a friend a couple $100 and get it back, yah know you've got honest to good friends.

Electronic interfaces do not ruin genuine relationships imo. They may not perceived as 'normal' but I was never one to much care about that. What really prevents people from bonding though is their own choices to push people away, whether from bad experiences or not. Technology is just usually what they move towards after they have done that, as it's a good time killer and solo activity where interaction with others is not necessary. Before it used to be your writers and readers. Whether that isolation is bad depends on the person and their reasoning. Sometimes isolation is good, and it's all about what that person takes out of the experience.

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On topic

Unfortunately our generation has less energy, especially in the US. However, you could even say the increase in isolation is correlated to our foods, drugs and diseases that are continuously sapping our energy levels. As a hypoglycemic this has been a huge issue for me and my social endeavors. There are more people today with conditions such as diabetes, depression and anxiety etc etc.

I wouldn't call people generally cold hearted as opposed to a lack of understanding. When has the human race ever been generally kind though? Lol. This isn't a new issue.

However if you mean a lack of manners and etiquette, that's a matter of a generation shift. Proper etiquette is not emphasized as importantly as it used to be.

As for people taking their time and talking to people next to them, Jesus have you ever been to a rural area? City folk, heck even suburban dwellers move quickly, but not your rural people. They do it real nice and slow and talk for half a day while your checking out your groceries, it's still out there. Just not in your area.

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Posted 7/21/15

PrinceJudar wrote:
As for people taking their time and talking to people next to them, Jesus have you ever been to a rural area? City folk, heck even suburban dwellers move quickly, but not your rural people. They do it real nice and slow and talk for half a day while your checking out your groceries, it's still out there. Just not in your area.


I've lived in both large cities and rural backwaters (trust me, I did not learn about grange halls in a city).

I agree, life is much slower in rural areas, but the people are much more insular. Many will die with the same friends they had as school kids, and I envy them for that, but they don't accept people from the outside.

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Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15
I guess so? I started to notice my family interacting less and less when technology became advanced. Most of the time my dad would just stare at his phone the whole time and doesnt really talk. Also with my brother he wouldnt participate in any activities anymore, most of the time he's just on his ipad and ignoring everyone. In my school as well, most of the time you would see girls on their phone the whole time. When theyre with their friends, everyone in the group is on their phones and their not even talking! Its sorta harder to talk know a days to people especially teens because they're occupied with their phones. I wouldnt say cold hearted, I think they're more isolated.
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Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15
You say that as a warm-hearted person, but as a cold-hearted person, I can tell you that technology makes it way harder to ignore family, friends, co-workers, strangers, and people having heart-attacks. "I'm not a doctor" no longer flies, cause they'll just tell you to call one. Dammit.

But on a more serious note, it really is so much easier to communicate with people now, that I don't really get the idea that we're less social or talkative, or caring. Writers have been thinking for centuries about isolation, loneliness, and lack of mutual caring between people, and many, from at least the renaissance period (probably earlier, too) have blamed city living, or industrialization, or technology. Plus, I refuse to believe that centuries of people loved small-talk and familiar greetings with people you don't know any more than they do now, mostly because we have written records of people complaining about exactly this since the beginning of written history. Hell, even oral history complains about the cold-heartedness of people, if the bible is to be trusted. Or maybe we're just so cold, that our standards have dropped? Perhaps, in ancient times, you could talk for hours about your dreams, passions, and philosophy, and come away thinking "well, that was rather cold of him, wasn't it?"

Anyway, I've only ever lived in my time, so I don't know, but I'm tempted towards this conclusion: For people that crave connecting with others, whether it be towards many or few, technology has made it far easier to achieve their goals. Ask anyone in a foreign war-zone whether their calls to family and friends are any less emotional than a letter would have been centuries ago, and I can guarantee they'd say they aren't. On the flip side, anyone that doesn't want to deal much with others, or only deal with the few that he or she cares about, will easily use amazon and text message to limit facetime with the boring, fruitless small-talk that permeates everyday activity. I think it unlikely that society has gotten any warmer or colder, except perhaps superficially. More likely, is that "cold-hearted" people are better able to act as they wish, as are "warm-hearted" people. By the way, those terms are bullshit, but I basically get the drift.

_________________

To answer OP, who doesn't seem to be connecting "cold-heartedness" with extroversion, I doubt it. People have more leisure time now than they ever have (excepting aristocrats, of whom the modern equivalents probably laze about on equal terms), and I think the drudgery and soul-crushingness of labor has probably, pretty damn close to equally, plagued the factory workers, salespeople, farmers, and the rest of our ancestors as much as it has today. I doubt the office clerk of today, filing paper, after paper, after paper, feels any less like a machine than the reaper cutting shaft, after shaft, after shaft, of wheat. And if you're referring to the fact that, even in leisure time, people spend all their time on the phone, or watching tv, or on the internet, or, in general, spending all of their time avoiding having to think or feel about anything, I would claim that these people have always existed -- I've no numbers on the commonality, though.
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Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15

Dariamus wrote:

I've lived in both large cities and rural backwaters (trust me, I did not learn about grange halls in a city).

I agree, life is much slower in rural areas, but the people are much more insular. Many will die with the same friends they had as school kids, and I envy them for that, but they don't accept people from the outside.



Yeah they do tend to be a little less accepting of different types of people as well. Traditional values, faith and all of that sort of thing are usually stronger in rural areas too. Their communities are typically a little more close knit then I'm used too.
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Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15
Humans are diverse and that will always be the case, however technology playing an integral part in society does cause an impact.
This impact however is impossible to fully analyse as you would have to check on every single human on the entire planet.
Generally i believe this technology has made people more self-involved however what everybody, at all times should always keep in mind is that humans are not rational and are very diverse.

Nobody is the same as one another and nobody will act in one certain way each time, e.g the nicest person can act cold hearted and the most horrible can have a moment of kindness. Someone "dumb" can do something "smart" and someone "unfit" can still do something physically great.

What makes us unique is the fact that we are unpredictable and do what we want, sometimes not even knowing why we do what we do (Theory on how the human mind never truly lets you know why you do things). Just keep in mind that the entire planet cannot change into a specific genre or stereotype simply because every single person on this planet is impossible understand.
To be more in-depth this is also functions into the various ecological systems humans have in place, these being the microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem and macrosystem (in order of influence). Each of these represent the influences of the world over a child, the microsystem is the closest being such things as parents, while the macrosystem is more cultural. The effects on the ecolgical systems are countless and these all impact what makes us, us. This adds into my point on how we are all unique, because we are all formed and built by perfectly unique people too.
One example just to finish off this theory (Made by Urie Bronfenbrenner if you want to look him up!) is how, let's say a child by the age of 12 has met over 2000 people in his life so far. Out of these 2000 people, 1000 of them have contributed towards his growth (known in child care as P.I.L.E.S - Physical, intellectual, language, emotional and social development.). These are 1000 completely and tottaly unique individuals that have all added and contributed towards this child's development in various ways.

When you look at it as i've shown above, technology really isn't going to ever impact a childs life as much the people who surround him or the life he lives, one subtle touch to a single part of the P.I.L.E.S can either make a child flourish or sink.

I can talk all i want about people being cold hearted and how i am a nice person, however i have my moments when i am not nice - so who am i to tell myself i am "good"?

To answer your question in a much less informational and professional standpoint... No, it doesn't. There have always been jerks, and always been kind people, technology will not affect a person but the life the person lives will.
Unless you're playing league of legends, then they are all scum!!
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Posted 7/21/15
I think yes and no, where I see (my point of view) that up to around 18-30's people could be a bit angry or more selfish then when becoming senior etc, you know "pain" (see naruto.. jk) then you can become more careing or "I know that feeling" or "should I do it for you?".

Maybe not accurate but atleast where I think it goes / and then \ cind of.
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