First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
Why Do People Demonize Mental Illnesses?
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/26/15
What I mean by demonize really is just see the worst of them.
And just dehumanize & alienate the people who have them. Unless its something common like a minor case of depression.

People would use them as basically a synonym for crazy, or just being moody.
People with Schizophrenia are crazy & violent.
People who are bipolar are crazy & moody.
People who are psychotic are crazy.
You know.
Most of my family/relatives unfortunately are like that. And that alone sorta I guess...made them wanna not really be around me much anymore. (Btw I have MDD, social anxiety disorder & some form of BPD I was recently diagnosed with. I did also have psychosis as well at some point).

Anyways, what do you guys think?
13141 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M
Offline
Posted 7/21/15
Its really hard to understand mental illness for a lot of people, including myself. Trying to put myself in a someone else's shoes, I find myself staring at the ways out I would take. Back in High School, for a while I was extremely depressed, but I re-evaluated my life and stepped forward. That is most people's experience with the symptoms of these disorders, especially depression. They feel down for a little while but they get past it, and because of that, it is difficult to empathize with those who cannot get out of it because of a chemical imbalance. That leads you to feel as if they are doing something wrong or choosing to not take that step forward, whether or not that is true. You need to understand that these people are usually not acting this way due to any ill will, but because they cannot fathom an existence in which these disorders exist inside them.

You also have to realize that, regardless of disorders, it can be really difficult to be around people with mental disorders. It can be extremely exhausting, physically and emotionally and I don't think you can blame them for distancing themselves when so many interactions turn into something negative. People don't like being around someone who can ruin a day on a whim, regardless of illness. While in a perfect world, they would be there for you (and in my experience, they are usually trying their best even if you don't see it), you also need to realize that no one can take these steps forward to bettering yourself but you. Whether that means learning how to control yourself, speaking to a professional or starting medication, it is on you.
11740 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M
Offline
Posted 7/21/15
I read a study that people buy into stereotypes unconsciously.


That and this:
http://www.spring.org.uk/2007/11/why-we-all-stink-as-intuitive.php
9236 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / I don't know T_T
Offline
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/26/15
There's a lot of news where they say the killers have mental illnesses, and those people ran amuck because they're either off their meds or their treatments didn't work. I think really, when we see on the news this kind of stuff, people end up generalizing it and thinking that all those people with these illnesses will do the same. It's called stereotypes. And it's a lack of education and awareness that brings people to think of this stuff.
49109 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 7/21/15
Ask Thomas Eagleton.
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/26/15
Heard it on the news, have ya?
18608 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/26/15
If I had to take a guess, it would probably be due to the way mental illness varies from a physical ailment.

Ignoring contagious diseases, being around someone who's physically hurt isn't going to directly affect you. Being around someone with a mental illness, however, can. It's not something visible or immediately apparent, so people will wrongly associate actions/outbursts directly linked to the disease to the person suffering from it.

Dehumanizing and alienating people suffering from mental illness is, I suppose, a way for the collective to keep itself from being affected by mental illness in any real or immediate way.

1080 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
101 / Under the Sea
Offline
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/21/15
I guess its because people don't have them? They don't have it so its hard for them to understand. They don't know the struggle of living of living it. Mental illness effects being around people so they see the negative sides of having it rather show compassion.
17050 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / CITY A
Offline
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/26/15
Well to keep it short its probably because there have certainly been documented cases of people with mental illness committing horrendous acts. Certainly with proper help these can be avoided, but I feel like most people don't want to take the chance that this schizophrenic guy they know is going to hear a voice telling him to kill them
86 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F / US
Offline
Posted 7/21/15
I personally think that mental illnesses have a certain stigma attached to them, likely because of ignorance. The media often generates this idea that mental illness leads to criminal activity, which causes fear. That often isn't the case at all, but because this idea has been ingrained into the minds of the general public, very few question it. In actuality, a mental illness can be just as detrimental as a physical disease, and should be treated as such.
51435 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / M
Offline
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/26/15
The media always covers mentally ill people slaughtering innocent bystanders just so they can have a story that attracts an audience. Sadly, the media loves blaming crazy people with guns and nothing else related to the problem. All of these crimes are preventable if these people get the mental health treatment they need. Why is there no one talking about that instead?
5447 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
54 / M / Tacoma, WA. wind...
Offline
Posted 7/21/15 , edited 7/26/15

Why Do People Demonize Mental Illnesses?


Lack of understanding. Stereotypes... Incompetent, sensationalistic journalism....

I could go on about this for pages. One of aunts who took care of me as a child had severe depression and back then it was looked upon as general laziness among other things. I don't see where that kind of thinking has changed much over the last forty or fifty years, generally speaking.

I think we are more aware of mental illness but we still don't know much about it as a society. We are living in a, "pull yourself up by your own bootstraps," mentality/age right how so I've found compassion to be a scarce commodity for things people don't understand.

8389 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M
Offline
Posted 7/21/15
People who kill tend to be demonised as you say.
Posted 7/22/15 , edited 7/26/15

Lowlights wrote:

If I had to take a guess, it would probably be due to the way mental illness varies from a physical ailment.

Ignoring contagious diseases, being around someone who's physically hurt isn't going to directly affect you. Being around someone with a mental illness, however, can. It's not something visible or immediately apparent, so people will wrongly associate actions/outbursts directly linked to the disease to the person suffering from it.

Dehumanizing and alienating people suffering from mental illness is, I suppose, a way for the collective to keep itself from being affected by mental illness in any real or immediate way.


Yeah I agree. I'm not sure how that would,feel though, being influenced from mentally ill people.
I guess I don't exactly understand why people don't understand them because I'm around them practically the whole time. I've gotten so used to them that I feel kinda uncomfortable around people who don't have some sorta mental disorder lol
Most of us are nice, and not so violent or hurt people (but themselves really...)
Its the stereotypes, and what media claims about them, and even how movies & TV represents them. They often portray them inaccurately or shows us just worst of it.
Honestly, that's more influential than a actually mentally ill person.

PhantomGundam wrote:

The media always covers mentally ill people slaughtering innocent bystanders just so they can have a story that attracts an audience. Sadly, the media loves blaming crazy people with guns and nothing else related to the problem. All of these crimes are preventable if these people get the mental health treatment they need. Why is there no one talking about that instead?

Ugh yeah.
And I doubt most of them we hear about actually are mentally ill. Because you always hear from the families like "we never saw it coming...they were nice...they saved a puppy once..."
However they go about it is bad either way. But I'd rather here the truth & not that excuse tbh.
Posted 7/22/15
I have Bipolar II w/ Psychotic Episodes...
and a bunch of other problems.

I know people judge me, especially people my
Dad and Grandparents age because of my
past wacko experiences...

but now that I'm doing good, some of them
still look down on me, and some of them
are really proud of me.

I still have my moments when I see
and hear things... and my moods can be
pretty crazy...

I'm pretty much a recluse...
I really hate the world,
I hate most people in the real world

I'm just a very anti-social and introverted
human being...

but it still hurts when people cast their stones

Oh well, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.