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Post Reply Career advice, please help me!
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Posted 7/24/15 , edited 7/24/15

ibrahim2712 wrote:

I think you should just stick with your degree. Look on the bright side, you have both a degree and a job.


Exactly!Do you think your'e the only one who struggles after graduation?My advice would be stick with your current job and get some type of unrelated part time job to make ends meet.Do you like your job?
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Posted 7/24/15

rizelmine17 wrote:

After finishing my masters degree in applied linguistics and started working in education as a teacher, I found the working conditions and pay to be unsustainable (most jobs only offer 25 hours of work a week). I also find that teaching large groups just isn't for me. Whats worse, I don't see much room for professional growth as an English language teacher.

I enjoy working on my own online start up teaching students one to one but I fear that it will never lead to a sucessful future. Should I go back and do more school (and go into more debt) in a new field which is more lucrative?

Please help, I'm under heavy psychological stress right now because of this dilemma.


Which province are you in? I'm told (by teachers) that teachers do pretty well in Ontario.

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Posted 7/24/15
I guess I would ask what was your intentions when you first decided to go for this degree? You can get another job that pays more money and hate it. If you are a teacher there are ways you can go further for instance being a academic coach, an assistant principal, principal, academic superintendent or superintendent of a school system. Also, a lot of teacher are coaches as well or do tutoring on the side. I am not sure where you live but depending on your school system some loans can be forgiven. If you want you can privately email me and I can help you out as I am in this field.

Education is not as satisfying anymore its about data data data
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Posted 7/24/15
Are you open to joining the Canadian armed forces? You have sufficient education to apply for direct entry into the officer corps.
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Posted 7/24/15
How long have you been out of school?

If you have completed your master's, and have a job that is covering your expenses, I don't think drastic measures are called for yet. Unless you just absolute despise your field in every possible way.

From my own experience, the hardest thing in just starting out was thinking I NEEDED to make big money. Starting out, I made more than enough to pay my bills, my debt and have an active social life. Looking back, I wish I would have just paid my bills and put a slice into retirement, then just enjoyed life with what was left over.

IMO, you should stick with the job and spend your free time/money pursuing your passions. With a little bit of time, you may discover an unseen opportunity in your field.

But like I said above, that is only if you don't entirely despise your field. If that is the case; you had better have a REALLY good idea what it is you despise, and then seek out a career counselor to help you find a field which is better suited to your demeanor.
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Posted 7/24/15
Here is the thing, you don't need more schooling. If the passion for a subject drives you, then the need will be present. Otherwise I think you are fine where you are at in terms of your personal education. When I lost a job I was sort of pressured into applying to schools for a Ph.D.

It was a big mistake, because for one, I didn't personally want a Ph.D, and second in the grand scheme of things it was never going to be a guarantee for a job, in fact it could have easily been the opposite. If you think finding a job is hard cause you don't meet the qualifications, there are many people with PhD's who can't find a job because they have too many qualifications. It sounds stupid, but true. Thankfully I found the courage to pull out before things got serious.

If you absolutely have to go back to school, it better be in a subject that you are really interested in, and you should do that on an assistantship or fellowship. Don't go further into debt. No schooling is worth it.
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Posted 7/24/15
The bottom line is this: if you want to change careers, debt or no, you must do it now.

You have already incurred student loans. That's fine. There is a minimum you will have to pay no matter what, but you CAN just pay the minimum. That's fine.

Where you end up wasting money and killing yourself slowly is if you take years to make the decision to finally switch careers and find that during those years, you were never properly motivated to do the job you were stuck at and so have never realized your full earning potential or moved up at all.

If you find something that really does make you happy, then you definitely should do THAT. If you need to go back to school, so be it. You are investing in your future. Just be sure you WANT this new path.

That being said, if you are asking people on the internet for their opinion about what you should do for the rest of your life, I would assume that level of passion has not been achieved. Why not do this: work at a well-paying job for a year (just to experience it) and decide exactly what it is you DON'T like about it. You will pay off your debt, and hone in further on what you truely want.

Pick a job that requires minimal interaction with groups of people. Take a government job, or work as a linguist for a hiring company. Take that year to really explore in your free time what it is you enjoy.

Once you're solid on that, then I must admit: it won't be bad to take on more debt going back to school. The only time it IS a bad investment is when you are wishy-washy about your career ambitions and think along the lines of "oh, I guess whatever is fine".
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Posted 7/25/15

Pahoehoe5 wrote:

I second the advice of seeing a career counselor who might be able to help you find something you'd like to do utilizing the education you already have, and I think you should also think long and hard about how you got through a master's degree in something without figuring out how you were going to live/reach your goals. Otherwise, you might just end up in the same situation again in 5 years with more debt and less working years available. Although you are young now and nothing wrong with having a false start and trying again, we all have a limit on how many years we have to work and to amass some savings for retirement. Unless you were born with a trust in your name for hard times/retirement, then you have to realize that each year that ticks by is one less year you have until you reach the age where no matter what you can't work anymore and you've got to make due with what you've done. So, take a little time now to make sure you're doing the right thing, and have learned from your mistake, before you waste more of your talents.


^ I think this person raises a very good point, especially regarding thinking long and hard about how a Master's was achieved without a real plan for the aftermath. I bring her point back up because debt is indeed a big issue, *however* it is not the end all of end alls. I say this because if you choose a path that you are truly, deeply, and irrevocably determined to follow, you can start that walk prepared for the associated costs. I'm less than sure, given you feelings about your current position, that you were at that level when you undertook earning your Master's.

Since you have already completed that particular journey, I'm agreeing with those saying to stick with your current position and supplement with other work until you can either get your debt down to a level you are more comfortable with. If you work hard, as in really hard, and live like you're still a college student, you should be able to whittle it down in a reasonable amount of time. During that time, explore and figure out what you actually want to do and maybe make a plan/take steps towards that new goal. A career counselor isn't a bad idea either.

I say all this coming from the position of being in graduate school currently, assuming I will be incurring somewhere around $150,000 USD in debt by the end of it. That being said, I chose this path carefully, with great consideration, and have a plan for paying it off (granted it'll take 20-25 years, but it WILL happen). If the passion is strong enough, there is often a way to make it happen. Just remember to think it through 100% before choosing something that will add to your current financial strain.


Best of luck!
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