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Post Reply Who is responsible for school supplies?
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32 / F / Texas
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Posted 8/5/15
I know this a bit of a weird topic to talk about but I would like to know y'all's opinion. For a public school, I personally think that as along as the school is not asking for top dollar items (e.g. Ipad, other technology); you would do anything to ensure your child is well equipped with essentials.

But, what if the teacher ask for housekeeping items that will be used throughout the year (e.g. Clorox wipes, kleenex). Is it excessive or not??

Let me know what you think??
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M
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Posted 8/5/15
You are responsible for the supplies one way or another.

Option 1: Advocate for/agree with higher taxes and funding for the education system. They will get whatever they need, and be able to buy in bulk for discounts.

Option 2: Advocate for/disagree with ever raising taxes for education. You will purchase school supplies directly.
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F
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Posted 8/5/15
People are more willing to hand over goods or money if they feel they're either in the driver's seat deciding what and how much or getting something in return. You might establish a common pool of supplies paid for by fundraising events your parent-teacher association puts on, you might simply ask for donations on an "as you can" basis for individual classrooms, or you might try both and use the supplies obtained with the parent-teacher association's funding as a backup stock.

Ideally local education budgets would be sufficiently large to provide something like tissue paper, but if you find you're just blowing through it (badum-TISS) the above is a good way to supplement your stocks.
Wihl 
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Posted 8/5/15
If school district can not afford cleaning or housekeeping supplies, then the problem is the management of the school system. Audit the school system to see where the money is going.
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16 / F / Always my room
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Posted 8/5/15 , edited 8/5/15
I think that it may be embarrassing to children who can't afford to bring in things but at the same time I don't think it should be the school's responsibility to provide everything. Maybe things should be spilt and school buys some things and parents buy the others. One reason I feel this way is because I recently helped packing backpacks for children whose parents couldn't afford to buy everything. There is a huge list of supplies that the school requires everyone to have and I could see the trouble it could impose on parents. I feel if it was spilt evenly it may be easier not only for the parents but the children as well
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52 / M / Bay Area
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Posted 8/5/15 , edited 8/5/15
My sons teachers always have a wish list they put on door with 3x5 cards during first week of school. A parent can take a card which might say 1 box of #2 pencils which is like 2.50
1 box Kleenex
Cleaning stuff sometimes is on there or liquid soap the rule we have no item can be more that 5 dollars but to be honest to keep a germ free classroom I would supply liquid soap for the entire school- lol
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19 / M / Cali
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Posted 8/5/15
Preparing for the worst is the best choice.

"Wait.. they might not have stuff for me to use. Let's play it safe and buy my own."

If it's a public school and providing free education, the least you should do is buy your own equipment.
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Posted 8/5/15 , edited 8/5/15
In most school systems, the parents have to send the kid with a predetermined CARE package of essentials, as published on the school's website.

Naturally, Target and Staples are happy to assist parents with this annual Scavenger Hunt , and every time I'm at either store around September, I like seeing the printout sheets from ALL the local schools in the area located at the front of the store, with displays for the special promotional shelves conveniently marked, where the list items are all grouped together for easier buying...er, locating.
(It's nostalgic to see which classes still require 8-boxes of crayons, and which have moved on to protractors.)
Posted 8/5/15
My grandparents always had to pay for all my school supplies
plus the supplies like Kleenex/Wipes, and also all my clothes
for the year.
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Posted 8/5/15
That is SO true. Why the hell does my kid need to supply toilet paper for a school? I sure as hell don't buy toilet paper for my job.
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27 / M
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Posted 8/5/15 , edited 8/5/15
You should not expect the school to shoulder all the costs. I can understand wanting to rent books rather than buy expensive textbooks, but personal items such as writing utensils and bags should be brought by the students or their families.

The school should be responsible to maintaining and restocking its own faculties, though, such as restrooms and gyms.
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Posted 8/5/15 , edited 8/5/15

FlyinDumpling wrote:

That is SO true. Why the hell does my kid need to supply toilet paper for a school? I sure as hell don't buy toilet paper for my job.


And believe me, if I was supplying toilet paper for the school, I'd buy something a heck of a lot better than that transparent sandpaper/onionskin they DO use because they could buy it bulk.
Posted 8/5/15
The school
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37 / M / USA
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Posted 8/5/15
Yes you have to buy school supplies for your kids/their classroom. I thought this was standard procedure.
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Posted 8/5/15

Ejanss wrote:

And believe me, if I was supplying toilet paper for the school, I'd buy something a heck of a lot better than that transparent sandpaper/onionskin they DO use because they could buy it bulk.
What gets on my nerves is when the teacher asks for these home supplies while the school is handing out fliers asking for a $5 donation. Like I have to get tissues, toilet paper, paper towels, baby wipes, hand sanitizer AND you ask me for a donation? I remember volunteering as a counselor in training and kids would literally buy the whole lists of items that was requested to impress the teacher.

And this is 30 something kids we're talking about. After the semester is over, there would be bulks of left over items for people to take home
Posted 8/5/15
For the student or the school itself?

For the student, thats on the parents/guardians.

For the school, that also depends, public or private?

Private, whoever owns it, and their shareholders.

Public, well, taxpayers' money, one would think.

(and to make sure the funds go where they're supposed to go)

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