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Post Reply The "silent generation" 1928-1944 probably was the luckiest in humanity
Posted 8/12/15 , edited 8/12/15

DawnofSorrow wrote:

A lot of ppl here wouldn't enjoy living in those times, esp lgbt+, thankfully society has somewhat evolved, that lgbt+, women, men and women of color have rights. Though racism and discrimination continues to exist, today its not as much of a problem as it was before contemporary modern times. I often fantasize about time travel to diffrent eras, but in reality I wouldnt wamt to settle there!

White Heterosexual Cisgendered men: The 1930s-1950s was the best era in America.
Asians: Nope.
Black people: Nope.
Natives: Nope.
Latin Americans: Nope.
Mexicans: Nope.
LGBT+: Nope.
Jews: Lol Nope.
Women: Nope.

lol Yeah ikr.
Honestly in terms of aesthetics I guess, maybe. I like the look of the cars, diners, fashions etc of them. I honestly think women looked (mostly in terms of beauty standards) the prettiest and most realistic compared to today's.

severticas wrote:

Well, only if you had your own home ad you weren't paying mortgages on it, no?

Are you implying they could of at the time and/or chose not to?

It was literally impossible for women to do that especially at the time. I mean that's why I lot of women chose to marry early too.
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Posted 8/12/15

anzn wrote:


BillNyeTheScienceDude wrote:

Wasn't the great depression in the 1930's...

Ya lol


The children born into the Great Depression came of age in the boom years following WWII.


Posted 8/12/15 , edited 8/12/15

DawnofSorrow wrote:

A lot of ppl here wouldn't enjoy living in those times, esp lgbt+, thankfully society has somewhat evolved, that lgbt+, women, men and women of color have rights. Though racism and discrimination continues to exist, today its not as much of a problem as it was before contemporary modern times. I often fantasize about time travel to diffrent eras, but in reality I wouldnt wamt to settle there!


Waaaay before the 1800's, homosexuality was considered normal in some places and black skin was beautiful. I don't know when the times started to change and homophobia and racism started to develop. I don't have the exact century because I read it on a book when I was in high school (many many years ago) and I have the memory of a fish.



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Posted 8/12/15

Ssomething wrote:


DawnofSorrow wrote:

A lot of ppl here wouldn't enjoy living in those times, esp lgbt+, thankfully society has somewhat evolved, that lgbt+, women, men and women of color have rights. Though racism and discrimination continues to exist, today its not as much of a problem as it was before contemporary modern times. I often fantasize about time travel to diffrent eras, but in reality I wouldnt wamt to settle there!


Waaaay before the 1800's, homosexuality was considered normal in some places and black skin was beautiful. I don't know when the times started to change and homophobia and racism started to develop. I don't have the exact century because I read it on a book when I was in high school (many many years ago) and I have the memory of a fish.





Ancient Greece for one.
Posted 8/12/15
but if you like jazz ....
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Posted 8/12/15
Stock market crash+great depression+dust bowl+ww2= a lucky time to be alive?

idk man but that sounds like a pretty horrible time to be alive tbh
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22 / M / The Cosmos
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Posted 8/12/15
Luckiest generation for white americans yeah
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Posted 8/12/15 , edited 8/12/15

famoussas93 wrote:

Stock market crash+great depression+dust bowl+ww2= a lucky time to be alive?

idk man but that sounds like a pretty horrible time to be alive tbh


The war in Europe was over in 1945, children born in 1928 would have been 16 or 17, just entering the work force during the biggest economic boom in U.S. history. .

Yes, their childhood would have likely been rough, but they enjoyed the largest middle class any society has ever seen in adulthood. Pension plans, home ownership, and retirement at 55 was the norm for this generation

And the generation was not silent. They were responsible for much of the social reform that shapes today's society. Most importantly, women's rights.

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Posted 8/12/15
Despite being a straight, white, male, I would not like the fifties. I am not neurotypical. Until I learned how to intentionally alter my body language and consciously read non verbal social cues I had a very hard time getting along with most people. I also have a harder time with a lot of things that are basic for other people like sarcasm, normal humor, and certain kinds of social norms. Back then this would have gotten me into even more violent confrontations than it did in my lifetime. I would have been far more likely to end up criminalized or institutionalized. I would not own a home, I would probably not be married, and I would certainly not have enjoyed my life as well. I'll take these more progressive times out of pure self-interest. At one point as a kid they misdiagnosed me as autistic. Back then that was life-long institutionalization.

From a social structure perspective, we treat more people better now than we did then. Saying that era was better in most ways doesn't really hold water unless you're a close enough fit to our society's idealized norm. Which I, and the majority of Americans at present, don't jive with so well.
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Posted 8/12/15

LordDust wrote:
From a social structure perspective, we treat more people better now than we did then. Saying that era was better in most ways doesn't really hold water unless you're a close enough fit to our society's idealized norm. Which I, and the majority of Americans at present, don't jive with so well.

If the majority of Americans were that far out of the social norms, the social norms would have already been redefined.

My current job is not so different from the idealized social norms of the 50's. My only problem is that I entered the position late in life and carry a lot of debt I accumulated getting here. Most of my co-workers do live that idealized life - middle class home owners, married, with families. My supervisor just retired after 42 years with assets of over 2.5 million, not because he was paid an outrageous salary, but because he spent 40 years investing in IRA's and home ownership in addition to his pension (he was an older pension plan, one that dated back to the 60's)..

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Posted 8/12/15

Dariamus wrote:


LordDust wrote:
From a social structure perspective, we treat more people better now than we did then. Saying that era was better in most ways doesn't really hold water unless you're a close enough fit to our society's idealized norm. Which I, and the majority of Americans at present, don't jive with so well.

If the majority of Americans were that far out of the social norms, the social norms would have already been redefined.

My current job is not so different from the idealized social norms of the 50's. My only problem is that I entered the position late in life and carry a lot of debt I accumulated getting here. Most of my co-workers do live that idealized life - middle class home owners, married, with families. My supervisor just retired after 42 years with assets of over 2.5 million, not because he was paid an outrageous salary, but because he spent 40 years investing in IRA's and home ownership in addition to his pension (he was an older pension plan, one that dated back to the 60's)..


The "average American" is not the same today as they were then. To claim that era would be better for 50% or more of the current American populace isn't a tenable position.
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Posted 8/12/15
Economically I think so. Socially, I don't think it was for everyone.
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Posted 8/12/15

LordDust wrote:

The "average American" is not the same today as they were then. To claim that era would be better for 50% or more of the current American populace isn't a tenable position.




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Posted 8/12/15

Dariamus wrote:


LordDust wrote:

The "average American" is not the same today as they were then. To claim that era would be better for 50% or more of the current American populace isn't a tenable position.






Economics alone do not provide anywhere near a complete picture for how someone is doing. Domestic violence was not prosecutable, it was not legally possible to convict a husband of raping his wife, civil rights weren't exactly awesome, the Red Scare, no AC, Polio, the list goes on. A previous poster also mentioned women staying home. I think the number of women working outside the house that also had small children was about 40%. The era was not a "Golden" age.
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Posted 8/13/15
How were they the luckiest? I mean think about America. The Great depression. Also, think of the discrimination, rights, intolerance, lack of independence etc. Also, world war 2...
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