First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
Post Reply Why are people so sensitive?
4315 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / M / Arizona
Offline
Posted 8/11/15
So I've noticed people have become increasingly more politically correct.
It seems nothing is allowed to be joked about or the standards for whats "ok" are skewed.
I think comedy should be free from censorship, comedy is a way we deal with tragedy and the oppresion life serves.
What are your thoughts on comedy censorship, and what do you consider "off limits"?

9551 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M
Offline
Posted 8/11/15 , edited 8/11/15
Unless a government is coming down and banning comedy its not censorship. People complaining about something is not censorship.
22653 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / USA
Offline
Posted 8/11/15
Generation of being giant pussies.
17189 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
(´◔౪◔)✂❤
Offline
Posted 8/11/15
Free speech means the government can't legally enforce censorship on you. It doesn't mean people can't call you an asshole.
20192 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / The Heroes Associ...
Offline
Posted 8/11/15 , edited 8/11/15
Yeah everyone's becoming thin-skinned baby's afraid of getting an emotional booboo

While I never go "too far" with my jokes, I don't really hold myself back in terms of what I joke about and I really dont give a flying fuck if you're offended by what I say, because quite frankly, there are better things to do than get offended by what a stranger says to you. I don't think there should be any limits on what can be said in comedy, but people should realize there will be repercussions for what is said and that by making a joke that may anger people, you must be prepared for their response.

If we start worrying about everyone and catering to them, it would be the legitimate death of creativity and entertainment as it is now would cease to exist.

It also seems as if people are actively trying to be offended by things, its as if they are competing in the oppression/offended Olympics and who ever is the most offended by the end of the day wins a gold medal. You can offend someone by saying "whats up man?" to someone who identifies as a woman now. Its like, fuck, dude.. im not trying to offend you, how am I supposed to know your life story".

Offense is never given, its taken.
35035 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 8/11/15 , edited 8/15/15
CR, the whole "SJWs suck! PC is bad!"/"We're not SJWs, and political correctness isn't even a thing to worry about!" argument really needs a new spin. We need a new way of having this discussion at the very least. Since we're on comedy I propose examining the competing views on the subject expressed by a pair of comedic works. Since I like musicals I choose Broadway productions.

The Producers is a production whose entire premise is that two men scheme to take advantage of "political correctness" surrounding the German holocaust and Nazism, which they assume will transform a show they put on into a failure so they can pilfer its budget without being noticed. The linchpin of the show's climax is that "political correctness" doesn't prevail over comedy, that society is perfectly willing and able to find enjoyment in satire of sensitive subjects, and therefore the con artists' assumptions about their audience's sensitivity were ultimately false.

Another very successful production is Avenue Q, which takes a different view of "political correctness" in its song "Everyone's A Little Bit Racist". The thrust of the song is that "political correctness" is something which needs to be reigned in, and that people should continue to acknowledge that implicit biases (in this case on the basis of race) are problematic while simultaneously recognising both that all people have implicit biases of one sort or another and that vilifying them for this isn't productive. The work asserts that this is, for better or worse, just how people are, and understanding and acceptance of this fact can actually serve to promote the cause of "political correctness" without creating all the consternation and misunderstandings that rigid adherence thereto does.

Both works, I think, have interesting points to make. I believe Avenue Q in its assertion that implicit biases are pervasive, that they're not intrinsically malicious, and that vilification of people for holding them doesn't advance the cause of preventing them from manifesting as expressed biases. Still, I'm also of the mind that The Producers is right in its argument that audiences are ultimately still receptive to satire of sensitive subjects in ways which might not necessarily conform to standards one would call "politically correct". Case in point, Avenue Q is a major hit which has toured internationally and won several Tony awards. People love it, and it is not trying to be "politically correct" with its satire. It's my position that "political correctness" is an exaggerated problem, but not a wholly nonexistent one.
1606 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / Earth
Offline
Posted 8/11/15 , edited 8/15/15
We need more George Carlins'.
1495 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
17 / M / CS Colorado
Offline
Posted 8/11/15 , edited 8/11/15
People want to feel like there right by calling you out on something that could be offensive

It's all for attention, no one Really cares, "oh, I heard a racist joke today, imma go jump off a cliff", no one sais that, and if they do its probably not because of that racist joke x3
49485 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / Colorado
Offline
Posted 8/11/15
Can you picture Benny Hill being censored? How boring it would be. Like the old saying, "Sticks and bones may break my bones but words will never hurt me".

Seriously, I think it is how we are raised. Here in the States, parents interfere with the growing up process and try to work out the problems for their children instead of allowing them to solve it themselves. This interference gest reinforced when they get older because they have imprinted the actions of their parents in their behalf. I don't have children just nieces and nephews so I could be wrong. But I think part of the growing process is developing a thick skin.

I remember when we returned from Germany to San Antonio and my brother was always bullied by this kid for being German. He did not understand that my brother was an American that lived in Germany because my Dad was station there. Finally, my brother fought the kid. The bullying stop and they became best friends. Problem solved. No school interference. No parents suing each other. Probably not a good example, but it did built character.
5447 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
54 / M / Tacoma, WA. wind...
Offline
Posted 8/11/15
This reminds me of the joke/comment that Don Imus told about the Rutgers Women's Basketball team, that lost him his job.... The comment from my perspective was funny, it was also despicable.
I think that if people are becoming more PC, (a phrase that has been used to bash people that just want a little respect), it's because everyone is getting tired of crude stupid humor.
I used to listen to Howard Stern quite a bit but after a while it was just the same old bathroom humor.
16215 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M
Offline
Posted 8/12/15
we need a new band that lets kids channel their anger... like nirvana did
27250 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M
Offline
Posted 8/12/15 , edited 8/12/15
I think this is a problem unique to the US. I've been to a number of other countries and none of the people are as uppity about correctness as people in the US.

People need to realize that being offended doesn't make them right. The constant whining is quite annoying.

We're at the point where people don't stop at being upset by things they personally find offensive, and I think that is potentially a problem. They assume certain people will be offended or that someone somewhere will be offended. It's like having the sensitivity of twelve people put into one person. It's nosy, presumptuous, and silly. It's like a person who keeps telling you what you want and what you need even though they have no actual idea because they aren't you.
Posted 8/12/15 , edited 8/12/15
Because they can & want to probably.

People who offend are at fault here as well. If they're legitimately being offensive, they won't apologize because "its just a joke. They don't mean it." And also get defensive about it.

From a humor standpoint, you just gotta actually be funny with it, and be real if you know it might come off as offensive.

Gay jokes, race jokes, gender jokes, political jokes...they can all be funny.
Just don't be tasteless & actually be funny.
I'm surrounded by a good amount of folk who regularly joke about that stuff, & its actually funny.

Doing shit like what certain Youtubers do every now & then...like Shane Dawnson, JennaMarbles & Sam Pepper is literally not funny at all, just plain gross & offensive :/
Posted 8/12/15 , edited 8/12/15
Why are you so insensitive?
14924 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / San Francisco
Offline
Posted 8/12/15 , edited 8/12/15

Diabloterr wrote:

we need a new band that lets kids channel their anger... like nirvana did


Because that worked out really well for Kurt Cobain. Seriously, if you weren't exactly cognizant (and you weren't, if you're really 27), don't comment on Nirvana. It was an age that you were not a part of and therefore, can't comprehend.

I think being PC is the "in" thing to do. There seems like an awful lot of whites people who seem to want to prove to the world that they don't have "white privilege", in some bizarre effort to demonstrate that they're tolerant. Which, if you have to try to denounce where you come from in an effort for everyone to accept you, seems like the same problem that most groups have faced.

In other words, nothing new to see here, folks. What goes around comes back around.

First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.