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Post Reply Can just about anybody become a writer?
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Posted 8/31/15

slfcmore wrote:

For NBC, yeah


Thanks for the bit of humor.
Posted 8/31/15 , edited 8/31/15
Can't you just copy other writers' style? Do not worry about the silly stuff like grammar lol.. you can employ someone for that. Yes, anyone can become a write, i think most of writing is in the research you do.
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Posted 8/31/15 , edited 8/31/15

qualeshia3 wrote:

Thanks for the help. Although the reading part might be hard because I can't visually read book.


Get into audiobooks...theres a ton of resources for getting audiobooks really cheap these days, like audible.com which I've never used but I've heard a lot of good things about.
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Posted 8/31/15 , edited 8/31/15

qualeshia3 wrote:


Dariamus wrote:

Simply being good at grammar does not make you a good story teller.


That is where I worry.


How many technical writers and English teachers would love to be able to tell a story

How many volumes of grammatically correct letters do I write every day as a government analyst? I tried writing stories once, reading my own work was painful. My college grammar teacher said it best: my writing was soulless and I would be better sticking to computer code.

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Posted 8/31/15 , edited 8/31/15
Yes, anyone can be a writer. Yes, I can and have written stories in the past.

Whether what you write is good or not, is totally different, but I think anyone can become a good writer with enough practice and an editor friend to help them along.

If you want to get better at writing, you just write every day - it's like any other skill that way. I was part of a writing forum once where we all strived together to write a certain number of words each week to keep our writing sharp. I've also participated in NanoWriMo (http://nanowrimo.org/), in which you write 50,000 words over one month. You should join up with the November group if you're interested in writing. If I recall, you need to write about 1,600 words per day to keep up.
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 8/31/15
can anyone become a write? yes.
can anyone write a story that sells? no.
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Posted 8/31/15
Everyone will be able to write a sentence or maybe even a short story we do learn that in school after all (even tho my grammar and spelling remained on a terrible low level)
However writing books is way more than writing.
Before you write the first sentence of your story you will have spend months maybe years with developing your story do research and create your characters.
Obviously the amount of work will vary depending on the book you write.
The easiest way to start was writing books for a franchise something like Shadowrun or Warhammer 40k books.
The world already exist in great detail so you saved a lot of time all you had to do was creating your characters and the story (if you didn't know the world you would need to read up on it as well of course)but even if you can borrow a well established world to create something good you still would need a lot of time to prepare before you can start writing your actual book.
A story is more after all than the scenario, plot and players you need to add depths to your characters find a way to bring your story to live and that is not something you can be taught its hard work and very time consuming and more often than not frustrating lol
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Posted 8/31/15 , edited 8/31/15

qualeshia3 wrote:

Let me know if a thread like this one exist or not.
Thanks a bunches.

Explain your opinion in great detail.

Writing is hard but is it something that anybody can do? Even with practice can just about anyone can become a good writer? Or is it something you have to be gifted in?

Bonus Question:

1) Are you able to write a story?


I think, like anything in the arts, it comes down to one's dedication and love for the practice. I, for one, plan on spending the rest of my life as a writer, and so I find myself thinking up story ideas and writing constantly.

The thing is, though, because I love writing and storytelling it doesn't feel like hard work and I'm less concerned about being 'good' for other people. Rather, I write out of pure enjoyment and always look for new ways to express myself and my stories through different techniques I learn or pick up. I constantly ask questions about writing and enjoy the process of creating rather than being only concerned with the final product.

I do think writing requires hard work, but I also think some people have a natural gift; this gift, however, is not talent but rather the love and passion for the medium, which makes all of that hard work and improvement that is necessary to be skilled feel enjoyable and fun throughout the process.


TLTR:


P.S. I have wrote a few short stories and I am working on two smaller series. Finishing a story, I will say, is the hardest part of being a writer for me since you must part ways with your characters, although I've done it before.
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Posted 8/31/15

Dariamus wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:


Dariamus wrote:

Simply being good at grammar does not make you a good story teller.


That is where I worry.


How many technical writers and English teachers would love to be able to tell a story

How many volumes of grammatically correct letters do I write every day as a government analyst? I tried writing stories once, reading my own work was painful. My college grammar teacher said it best: my writing was soulless and I would be better sticking to computer code.



I worry about my grammar when I write a lot but I just write.
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Posted 8/31/15

sundin13 wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:

Thanks for the help. Although the reading part might be hard because I can't visually read book.


Get into audiobooks...theres a ton of resources for getting audiobooks really cheap these days, like audible.com which I've never used but I've heard a lot of good things about.


Been there and I like it.
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Posted 8/31/15


Writing is all I know how to do and I'm not even that great at.
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Posted 8/31/15

namealreadytaken wrote:

can anyone become a write? yes.
can anyone write a story that sells? no.


I worry.
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Posted 8/31/15
You can't write if you can't relate.
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Posted 8/31/15

sundin13 wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:


Dariamus wrote:

Simply being good at grammar does not make you a good story teller.




That is where I worry.


-Get people to read your story and ask them to be as harsh as possible. Its hard to convince people you know to be harsh, but make it clear how important criticism is. No one has ever improved by being told that they are perfect.

-Read other books to get a feel for how they do certain things (I've found that action scenes are extremely tough to write because they are all about movement). After I finish my novel (hopefully by the end of the year), I plan to read a lot. I want my work to be new, so I don't want to taint my brain with the solutions that other people have found, but I think reading is tremendously important in the editing phase.

-Read critiques and analyses of stories in general. Get a feel for what makes other works good or bad (to the smallest detail) or just what the writers are considering as they write. I recently started watching Youtube videos by Every Frame a Painting, which is a film critique show, but some of the ideas such as "Who wins a scene", character placement etc are still interesting and important to think about in a literary context. Go back and apply these principles to your work and maybe you will find that you could make some tweaks to strengthen the impact of a scene.

Good grammar does not make a good story teller. However, understanding what a good story teller is, does go a long way to getting you there.


Perfect advise. Enough said.

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Posted 8/31/15 , edited 8/31/15

cyberfaust wrote:

You can't write if you can't relate.


Relate?
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