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Post Reply Do you believe we've become an over sensitive generation?
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15


Well, good sportsmanship has been kind of a thing since people could actually call you out and duel you to the death. Even professional athletes receive fines and suspensions for excessive show-boating and general displays of poor sportsmanship.

To answer your question, NO. I do not believe society has become more sensitive. If anything we are more tolerant. There was a day when you would wear a suit a tie to work, even if you were working in the backroom of a poultry plant. You would brown nose your boss, and romance him/her by inviting them home to dinner and meet your family. This is the guy performing your reviews after all. You would also treat women with respect. ie Watch your language, hold the door for them, take off your hat, pull up your pants, tuck in your shirt, address Miss, Mrs, or Ma'am accordingly. No, unfortunately etiquette is out and having your face glued to your phone is in.
Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
Pretty much.

I do believe we have become a trashy generation as well. It's pretty disgusting.
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Posted 9/17/15
yup



ty internet
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15

AkitoMadaka wrote:

For example, talking smack in games is pretty much a universally ban-worthy offence.

I think Tumblr is a pretty good environment to see that in action with the use of "trigger warnings" and "preferred pronouns".

I was bullied as a kid, for better or for worse, I grew pretty thick-skinned.

Another note is I work as Quality Control at a poultry plant. Most of the people who work here are felons and nearly no one in my department can pass a drug screening. I've never done drugs, and i've had some run ins with the cops as a kid, but that was ages ago. I use some colorful language at times, never directed at anyone or used to demean or belittle people, but rather when just talking in general.

Example:

Boss: "Hey dude, how many pallets of X do we have in the cooler?"
Me: "We got a truckload of the shit so i'd bet around 20-22. I'll check when I catch up with this damn paperwork."
Boss: "Cool man, appreciate it"
Random girl: "Why are you so disrespectful? That language is really offensive."

Maybe it's because I grew up in the South


I make an effort not to talk in generalizations, so I'm going to attempt to answer the specific context that you have provided.

1) talking smack in games
It's up to the people who run the games whether or not smack talk is worth protecting in their games. You wouldn't go to a restaurant and start swearing at the top of your lungs, then complain when you're banned from entering the restaurant. Sure, maybe the other patrons could just 'ignore' you, but the fact is that you're in a public place and you have to realize that that means certain behaviours are going to be looked down upon. Personally, if I ran a game, I would not care to fight for your right to smack talk your opponents.

2) trigger warnings
There's a thread for this already.

3) preferred pronouns
My issue with you having an issue about preferred pronouns is that if you are against specialized pronouns then 'he' and 'she' would cease to exist. I'm not sure I'm ready to refer to every single person in this world as xe/ze/whatever the kids are saying now. I think it would be nice if there was a genderless pronoun in addition to 'he' and 'she' though.

4) work language
That's not just the south. That's all factories or plants. Even in Canada.

Generalizations are pretty useless. I don't even know which generation you're referring to since you didn't give a range of birth years. Referring to myself and my experiences, I'd say that the bigger problem is apathy rather than sensitivity. So many young people don't vote, or care about who is running their country. If they're paying attention long enough to be offended by something, I think this might be the lesser evil. [This entire last paragraph is a generalization, and as a result, sounds stupid.]
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Posted 9/17/15
Yea..
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Posted 9/17/15

Kitahoshi_Hazel wrote:


I make an effort not to talk in generalizations, so I'm going to attempt to answer the specific context that you have provided.

1) talking smack in games
It's up to the people who run the games whether or not smack talk is worth protecting in their games. You wouldn't go to a restaurant and start swearing at the top of your lungs, then complain when you're banned from entering the restaurant. Sure, maybe the other patrons could just 'ignore' you, but the fact is that you're in a public place and you have to realize that that means certain behaviours are going to be looked down upon. Personally, if I ran a game, I would not care to fight for your right to smack talk your opponents.

2) trigger warnings
There's a thread for this already.

3) preferred pronouns
My issue with you having an issue about preferred pronouns is that if you are against specialized pronouns then 'he' and 'she' would cease to exist. I'm not sure I'm ready to refer to every single person in this world as xe/ze/whatever the kids are saying now. I think it would be nice if there was a genderless pronoun in addition to 'he' and 'she' though.

4) work language
That's not just the south. That's all factories or plants. Even in Canada.

Generalizations are pretty useless. I don't even know which generation you're referring to since you didn't give a range of birth years. Referring to myself and my experiences, I'd say that the bigger problem is apathy rather than sensitivity. So many young people don't vote, or care about who is running their country. If they're paying attention long enough to be offended by something, I think this might be the lesser evil. [This entire last paragraph is a generalization, and as a result, sounds stupid.]


Yeah, this is about my feelings too. Every generation has similar conversations about the younger generation. It's honestly pretty dumb.
There is also the fact that a lot of the people complaining about the world becoming too pc just kinda sound like "I can't make jokes about retards anymore uuugh". No, that's not "becoming pc", as a whole people are learning that surprise, people have feelings. And the people they often source as being offended all the time are very obvious internet trolls..
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Posted 9/17/15

Jorvac wrote:

I can't even describe someone who is black as black without getting called racist. It's pathetic.


Here's the thing about that, it's kinda interesting.. people who say that's racist are usually white. I go to a majority black school, and close to none of them find that offensive. A similar thing is happening to people who describe things as gay, straight people tell them not to while anyone not straight does it all the time.
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
I don't know. I always get the vocal minority feeling when I see a lot of these people being "offended." A lot of them, like on Tumblr, seem to be in the habit of getting offended for other people. I don't know how easily offended most people really are. I mean, I grew up in the south as well. I barely hear anyone getting offended about anything. It could just be the area I live in. However, the amount of people being offended on the internet doesn't seem to actually represent the people out in real life. Maybe they're just less vocal about it in real life.

All that, and we have a lot less to worry about. We're not worried about whether or not our crops are going to grow, so we can spend that time on the internet talking about how air conditioning is sexist. Honestly, if you see these people in real life, it only means that they have way too much time on their hands.
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26 / M / on your lap, purring
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Posted 9/17/15
"Do you believe we've become an over sensitive generation?"

Yes, overly sensitive to grammar.
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Posted 9/17/15
I think it's an overly sensitive time period.

It's not something affecting one generation over another. People in their 20's, 40's, 60's etc... they're all overly sensitive.

They also are getting more and more abstruse with the things they find offensive, and opinions are becoming VERY extreme in both content and context.

I think the problem originates from the internet and how easy it allows people to isolate themselves in an echo chamber where they surround themselves with media and other individuals that agree with them, and as such, their ideas are rarely challenged, which in turn leads away from the need for critical thinking and an understanding of how to debate.

Then again, I find a lot of things wrong with society and I blame it on the internet and its impact on the world. (there is some good to it, but I don't think societies or humans as individuals have developed any sort of defenses against the problems and addictions it causes).

That's just my two cents on the matter though
Posted 9/17/15
This reminds me of the voice actor Troy baker quitting Twitter https://twitter.com/troybakerva in regards to the quote he retweeted: https://www.siliconrepublic.com/life/2015/07/23/troy-baker-quits-twitter
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15

BlueOni wrote:

Swearing has always offended some people, and honestly one had better get used to the notion since that is never, ever going to change. That's why the words are noteworthy, and why children are taught not to use them. It's also exactly why children use them anyway, because doing so is participation in a forbidden activity (and therefore exciting if they can get away with it) and shocks people (which can be amusing for them).

Furthermore, transpeople requesting the use of preferred pronouns is nothing more than requesting respect for their gender identification. Since it's important for alleviation of the dysphoria that many transpeople face and polite to those transpeople who don't experience dysphoria that preferred names and pronouns be used, because asking people to do so is not an asinine exercise like being asked to be called "god" or an "attack helicopter", and because society has already shown that it's perfectly willing to refer to people by completely absurd nicknames like The Rock, Snooki, and Sting even if one does consider referring to transpeople by preferred names and pronouns to be as absurd as calling someone an attack helicopter, there's really very little reason to refuse. This is something society already does without even noticing.

Now, with all of that said there are those who will aim to offend for its own sake, and there are those who will take offence far too easily. There are people who simply want to fight and argue as a way to deal with their frustrations, or to get entertainment out of upsetting people, or to bring people down to being as angry as they are, or are simply closed-minded. We shouldn't let people like that use free expression as an impenetrable shield and phrases like "special snowflake syndrome" or "SJW" as a sword to keep themselves safe from criticism of their ideas. That's suppression of dialogue, not defence of it. Likewise, we shouldn't allow people to suppress any and all dialogue they consider offensive, and we shouldn't simply accept that the individuals, groups, or materials in question had malicious intent at face value. We should still be critical of offensive things, and we should still call out malicious individuals, groups, and materials, but critical thinking to sort the wheat from the chaff is needed. You have to know what to be critical of and when, or else you end up with threads like this and soften the ground that sincere activism has to walk on into a muck that just slows down progress by making that activism and its supporters look bad.

In other words, no. Society has not generally transformed into a bunch of whiny weaklings. Politics is conflict by its very nature, and social and economic issues have always been as contentious as they are now. It's just that we have media through which to express our conflicting viewpoints more broadly and quickly than ever before, so the veil that one's ideas are accepted as borderline axioms by the bulk of society (no really, that's a psychological phenomenon we all experience to some degree) has been lifted. That combined with social media's encouragement of people posting about every thought they have, everything they're doing, and everything they're around results in the phenomenon you're currently witnessing.


hey there. ;)

Long time no see.

Swearing I feel is about context. Words themselves, profane or not, have no real negativity except for that which the people within the social group put upon them. "special snowflake syndrome", as you point out, can be used as a general shield against criticism, but just the same, banning words removes the ability to discuss ideas and points of view in a critical fashion. Many points on this have been brought about recently comparing it to the new push to remove "negro" from Mark Twain's books, (and others), and the criticism in some cases is that people are now conflating teaching the criticisms of racism and its part to play in history with racism itself.

The trans portion of your point... I'm a little lost on.

Gender diaspora is a hot topic these days. I remember there's some sort of problems with it being labelled a mental illness under the DSM-V but not totally up to date on it.

Depending on your take of the issue, your answers may vary. Personally, I follow with the theory that gender in and of itself differs from sex, and that gender is a social construct. I find the pronouns rather silly and unworkable. Then again, I don't really find myself fitting well with the male/female dichotomy either.. (gender fluid is a nice term that I had grown attached to).

I see it as being about politeness and respect within the context of the people you are around.

It's like being at a dinner party.

You expect your host to treat you with a certain respect and hospitality, and you should give it in return. This used to mean politely obeying the rules of the house, and letting the little things slide that might not have been the way things are run at your home. Your host in return, doesn't comment on the water marks you leave on their furniture when you don't use a coaster, and other transgressions. And this is about each of you keeping your demands within reason.

The problem is today, you hold a party, and invite a few guests, and you are expect to serve dinner to cater to the vegan guest, the one who is strictly grain free and paleo, and the picky eater that only eats pepperoni pizza.

Everyone's so wrapped up in their own individual demands and restrictions that either you have to prepare and serve different meals to each individual or you simply don't ever have guests over.

Neither of those are really solutions, as it defeats the purpose of having a dinner party and everyone enjoying the same meal together.


Also, just to get back to swearing bit. I'm in the business of selling ball cocks, 6 inch nipples,, a few different probes, a whole variety of weirdly shaped male to male, female to female, and male to female connectors. I have waxes you have never heard of (no sex wax though. need to go a shop in Florida or California for that), and studs of all shapes and sizes.

And the fact that I can say those things with a straight face... well, it's taken a while.
Posted 9/17/15
Touchy feely is the order of the new day. Offend anyone and run the risk of getting taken to court.
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Posted 9/17/15

Finny-sama wrote:

Yeah, this is about my feelings too. Every generation has similar conversations about the younger generation. It's honestly pretty dumb.
There is also the fact that a lot of the people complaining about the world becoming too pc just kinda sound like "I can't make jokes about retards anymore uuugh". No, that's not "becoming pc", as a whole people are learning that surprise, people have feelings. And the people they often source as being offended all the time are very obvious internet trolls..


My husband just showed me this video on Youtube of a Monthy Python sketch called Four Yorkshiremen, and it describes my feelings about the use of the phrase "this generation" pretty well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe1a1wHxTyo

It's also pretty hilarious.
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Posted 9/17/15

serifsansserif wrote:
It's like being at a dinner party.

You expect your host to treat you with a certain respect and hospitality, and you should give it in return. This used to mean politely obeying the rules of the house, and letting the little things slide that might not have been the way things are run at your home. Your host in return, doesn't comment on the water marks you leave on their furniture when you don't use a coaster, and other transgressions. And this is about each of you keeping your demands within reason.

The problem is today, you hold a party, and invite a few guests, and you are expect to serve dinner to cater to the vegan guest, the one who is strictly grain free and paleo, and the picky eater that only eats pepperoni pizza.

Everyone's so wrapped up in their own individual demands and restrictions that either you have to prepare and serve different meals to each individual or you simply don't ever have guests over.

Neither of those are really solutions, as it defeats the purpose of having a dinner party and everyone enjoying the same meal together.


Also, just to get back to swearing bit. I'm in the business of selling ball cocks, 6 inch nipples,, a few different probes, a whole variety of weirdly shaped male to male, female to female, and male to female connectors. I have waxes you have never heard of (no sex wax though. need to go a shop in Florida or California for that), and studs of all shapes and sizes.

And the fact that I can say those things with a straight face... well, it's taken a while.


I had a group of friends that did weekly dinners where two were vegetarian, one was vegan, and the other person had allergies to dairy, soy, gluten, and almost all white starches. I only bring this up because we made shared meals happen - it's possible to do if you want it enough. It also means the food doesn't always turn out because some ingredient substitutions aren't perfect, but we would all laugh about it if that was the case. You can bet that for birthdays we had vegan, gluten free, dairy free birthday cakes. It's not that it can't be done, but whether people are willing to try.

Baking without gluten, eggs, milk, and potato starch seemed impossible at first, but it turns out it only seems so difficult because it's not what we grew up with.
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