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Post Reply Can fat people be Oppressed?
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24 / M
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Posted 9/17/15

_Bender_ wrote:
I was only bring a different prospective to the table.
And I disagree with you, I think this entire movement is about body image. I think obese people feel attacked by how they look and I think they are fighting against something they don't believe in. It's just like any other activist group and there are multiply sides to every different story so think what you want.


I agree that they may feel attacked (whether or not that feeling is justified). The problem is the response. I don't have qualms with that feeling unless it is being used as a bogeyman to justify harmful self-destructive behavior. I do have qualms with the retaliation against the beauty norm of being a healthy weight and the blanket claims of oppression.
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24 / M / USA
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
No, I don't think they're oppressed.

I do think it's best evaluated on the individual level though as not everyone gains or loses weight as a bloody damn choice. It can be a side effect of certain and sometimes even dangerous medical conditions. In general, however, it is a choice people make, and they typically know who they are underneath their denial.

The health epidemic and frankly the rampaging blood sugar epidemic is not fixed by fucking glorification.



It's not about appearances. It's about health. Obesity is simply the result, but it's not the inherent issue. People that are thin or even a 'healthy weight' can be just as bloody unhealthy in other mannerisms, if not more so.

Before they go, "Haha, you said 'healthy' weight individuals can have health problems too!" just a reminder that if you're watching another ship being sunk whilst the water on your ship begins to coddle your toes perhaps you should stop sightseeing to avoid your problems.

That applies to any glorification of any sort of health issue.

It's fine to feel comfortable in your own skin, yah damn well should, but you shouldn't ever be complacent with known health troubles.

Mind you, to any of those that feel because someone you happen to not give a fuck about may have health concerns means it's somehow your place to say something stupidly offensive about it to provide some asinine version of 'help' for them. Don't. Just fucking don't.

Worry about your own ship, mate.


Finny-sama wrote:

My main problem is that there are doctors who don't properly treat their patients because they think all their problems stem from being fat. Some do, but not all.
I read something about this girl who was having heart palpitations, but the doctor didn't think anything of it because she was overweight. The doctor just told her to exercise. They later found she actually had a hole in her heart, and the exercise was making it worse.. that's not okay.


That's a problem with the medical industry. Take it from me, and frankly plenty of people who have been through similar. Most doctors like to default to an easy diagnosis like depression and anxiety for any associated common symptoms (fatigue, gain/loss of appetite, weakness, heart palpitations etc.) which are often side effects and not the cause. I have have my blood drawn about 10+ times in the last few months and I have $500 worth of bills sitting on the counter to sort out this weekend. That's just how the industry is with anything. They won't figure it out until it tries to fucking kill you, if it ever does. Mind you, I don't blame them when they're trying, but I've had some very arrogant and condescending assholes in the mix. Most try, some don't.



A lot of people deal with it. It doesn't stem from just the overweight mix.
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21 / F / Arizona, US
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
I wouldn't say "oppressed" is the right word rather discriminated against is. The reason I say discriminated is that being overweight/obese and skinny are genetic, however it is flexible and possible to fight against your genes. Personally, overweight/obese people are still human, so why judge them for being something that they were born with. Also, at the same time, it is important to encourage good habits on them and inspire them to be healthy and active. It will help them to be motivated to become fit thus they will try their hardest to do it. The problem is what people do is discourage them to not make those good choices by telling them they are fat and that they need to stop eating fast food. This will cause them to stress and it will make things worse. It is unhealthy to be overweight/obese because it is bad for your health, but it would help if people didn't shame them for being who they are. Being unhealthy doesn't mean "being fat", but also "being too skinny" isn't healthy either.
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19 / F / Don't Flirt With Me
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Posted 9/17/15

sundin13 wrote:


_Bender_ wrote:
I was only bring a different prospective to the table.
And I disagree with you, I think this entire movement is about body image. I think obese people feel attacked by how they look and I think they are fighting against something they don't believe in. It's just like any other activist group and there are multiply sides to every different story so think what you want.


I agree that they may feel attacked (whether or not that feeling is justified). The problem is the response. I don't have qualms with that feeling unless it is being used as a bogeyman to justify harmful self-destructive behavior. I do have qualms with the retaliation against the beauty norm of being a healthy weight and the blanket claims of oppression.


Haha yeah I never said I agreed with the response. But feel free to keep trying to argue with me. I could always use some more cr points. Also sorry for the long delay in response I was watching Durarara and didn't notice the new notification.
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27 / M
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
It's admirable that a person who is out of shape can still be confident, but many need to wake up and smell the roses. It is most certainly NOT healthy to be obese and sedentary; the statistics prove it. Therefore, someone who is overweight should strive to become a healthy weight. The only reason there is a high average weight is because everyone is fat. Average does not mean okay. It's not about stigma, although I cannot deny that there is a stigma against the obese. It's about health and acting responsibly rather than justifying everything to pamper your feelings at the moment. Depends what you want to focus on, really. You can focus on hard facts or you can try to protect your little feelings by prioritizing your momentary happiness and ignoring logic. If you can't think ahead and strive for a good result, it's no wonder you're still eating compulsively every day and patting yourself on the back. You can't change if you're like that. It's 120% laziness. It's mentally and physically unhealthy. By the time you realize you're 40 and obese, it's probably too late for you.

Even if a fat person goes to the gym and is surrounded by fit people, I do not hear much criticism in these situations. People truly respect and admire that a couch potato has suddenly decided to make big changes and improve himself. Everyone who has worked out for a while knows how demanding it can be to not simply be an acceptable weight, but to be fit, to have a body they always dreamed of. The only people with the heart to poke fun of fat people at the gym are high schoolers with entitlement and respect issues. They are not a reason for you to not change. You can't control what others say and do, but you can control what you do yourself.
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
Main reason why I'm touchy about it is because my dad lost a lot of weight and went down from being mildly obese to healthy again with exercise and dietary changes. He'd been fat for years and it took him a lot of effort to get his ass in gear. The doctor was about to diagnose him with diabetes, that is when he woke up and said things needed to change, ended up going down from a fat 220-230ish lbs to a healthier 160-170. I don't understand where people get the notion that you "can't keep weight off" after you've lost it. Yes, uh, you can.

It's really not that difficult, you can try and fall back into old habits but if you've been portion limiting for quite sometime, your stomach usually shrinks to accommodate the smaller portion and therefore you really can't go back to eating as much as you used to immediately.

I understand maybe falling back on exercise but my dad's been able to pretty consistently keep his weight down and has been for 2.5 years, and I've kept mine down at 105-115 for the past 2.5 as well when i used to weigh 130. The point is, your stomach usually expands or contracts to fit your new diet, it doesn't immediately revert back to its old fat self when youve decided you've lost enough weight. I can't binge like a pig anymore without feeling physically ill.
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28 / M / Winnipeg
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
You can't open a constructive discussion with "they make me sick." There is certainly a limit to denial and flimsy justifications, but to speak (or type) in such broad terms about a whole classification of people is shameful. I believe people should be allowed to have preferences about who they are attracted to, but I also believe people shouldn't be made to feel disgusted with themselves, because that's one slippery slope.

Does the expectation become that everyone should be fit, and if they are not, they should be ridiculed and shunned? Even if literally everybody ate healthy, never drank alcohol, and exercised every day, new expectations of how they should look and behave would arise. What size are her breasts? What colour should she dye her hair? And so on. Beauty norms definitely exist, but they're opinions that change with time. Even the style of clothing a person wears (also a choice) affects the impression and appearance you give to others.

It''s one thing for a fat person to expect everyone to see them as beautiful, and to speak of oppression when someone doesn't. That's BS no matter who you are or how you look or what you do. But it's another for a fat person to be happy with how and who they are, and to not feel the need to alter their lifestyle to maintain that happiness, and to expect common decency and respect, and to not be insulted and treated like a freak just for being in public, and that's what this "movement" is about.
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21 / M / Denton, TX
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Posted 9/17/15
Fat people are oppressing themselves. Being fat makes somebody unhealthy, more depressed than they otherwise would be, less attractive, walk slower, take up more space, weigh more, consume more, and cost lots of money of health insurance.

Also, they are not fat because of some bullshit medical condition. Law of conservation of energy.
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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/17/15
I believe they are oppressed to a certain extent.

If a person wants to eat so much to be fat on there own terms then that's there business not yours and they should be allowed to live happily like they are.

Sure its unhealthy but someone elses health is none of your business if someone wants to live unhealthy then that's there business.

I'm slightly overweight will be back to being skinny in a month or so though since i took up doing 2 hours of exercise a day so i can still eat as much as i do and drink alot of soda like i do

But in the end being a dick to someone because they don't care that they are fat is a dick move.

I have a friend who is depressed and fat and goes out on walks etc i asked him why he doesn't lose the weight he told me straight up he doesn't care about it he can't work anyway due to being disabled so he is stuck in home all day with that kind of life i can respect and understand why he wants to eat fatty foods (he eats next to nothing just chooses high carb filled foods like i did).


People need to shut there mouths and stop complaining if you complain you are pathetic.

Though i must say due to having a condition in where my hormones are way to low and my metabolism is next to non-existant even on 1000-1400 calories per day diet i hardly lose anything some of us have trouble losing weight due to many health problems and not to mention for me my family (apparently according to the doctors) is genetically more prone to gaining weight so we need to be more careful with our foods.

in the end mind your own bussiness some people have more going on that they need to worry about before there health some people are depressed and the more you yell at them "GET HEALTHY EAT BETTER" the more damage you are doing and they will eat more.
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27 / Naked in a pine tree
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Posted 9/17/15
I think people who are overly vain and hate the many imperfections other people have are d-bags, but I think its typical to draw judgements about people who are heavier when they look extremely unhealthy as a result. Obviously some people vocalize their judgements in very harsh ways, but not everybody does that.

Sure, you can call yourself beautiful and big or whatever, but please don't buy into the nonsense that's making you think you're fat yet perfectly healthy, or that it's just "genetics". Genetics if it has a role, is a minor one in regards to things like metabolic rate, but is no excuse as a crux to say that "it's impossible to lose it." That's simply false information, and in all likely-hood those people will die off long before the rest of us from the plethora of health issues caused by obesity. I do think that obesity-morbid obesity is more detrimental to a persons health than smoking.

If we were to all realize this, imagine all the Quit McLovin'it commercials that would air in place of some of the Smoking kills commercials. But that will never happen, the modern food industry is too dependent on their ability to poison the well.
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30 / M
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Posted 9/17/15
It can be true that fat people are oppressed if you use the word in its full meaning, which includes simply the act of feeling bad about something.

However, there is nothing predisposed to obesity, there are things that affect the odds ratio for obesity, but nothing that really forces a person into a category.
Therefore fat discrimination is as ligitimate as any other form of activity or decision based discrimination.

We pay people without degrees less than those with (and the circumstances of your birth dictate your education more than your obesity) so are the uneducated oppressed? (many schools of thought say yes, many say no)

Women with severe acne scarring do not become models, even though a large proportion of america has acne scars.
Are acne scarred women oppressed? PRobably not, as the job of being a model requires being objectively beautiful by whatever definitions we choose to give it. Whatever criteria we use, body weight, cheekbones, skin smoothness are all arbitrary and only the top 5% will ever be amazingly beautiful.

Men under 5'7" will struggle to get matches on tinder, probably moreso than fat people. Women put "noone under 5'10"" on their profile to applause, but can you imagine writing "no women over 190lbs"?
Are short men oppressed? No. Noone is obligated to find you attractive.
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30 / M
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Posted 9/17/15

netdisorder wrote:
If we were to all realize this, imagine all the Quit McLovin'it commercials that would air in place of some of the Smoking kills commercials. But that will never happen, the modern food industry is too dependent on their ability to poison the well.


You're pretty much right, but fast food competes with other fast food companies in their business.
If the market changed from $1 greasy as fuck burgers to $5 salads, salad franchises would take off.
It all relates to the demand end of the market. We can change that with information.
Information can make people pick something else.
Fighting the food industry would simply be telling these people they're not allowed to buy that anymore.

Fast food isnt the only cause of obesity either, France is McDonalds biggest European market, and the French have one of the lowest obesity rates in western Europe.

But yeah, a quit mclovin it ad would be great for public health.
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23 / M / Kaguya's Panties
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Posted 9/17/15 , edited 9/18/15
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27 / Naked in a pine tree
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Posted 9/17/15

animegirl2222 wrote:

Main reason why I'm touchy about it is because my dad lost a lot of weight and went down from being mildly obese to healthy again with exercise and dietary changes. He'd been fat for years and it took him a lot of effort to get his ass in gear. The doctor was about to diagnose him with diabetes, that is when he woke up and said things needed to change, ended up going down from a fat 220-230ish lbs to a healthier 160-170. I don't understand where people get the notion that you "can't keep weight off" after you've lost it. Yes, uh, you can.

It's really not that difficult, you can try and fall back into old habits but if you've been portion limiting for quite sometime, your stomach usually shrinks to accommodate the smaller portion and therefore you really can't go back to eating as much as you used to immediately.

I understand maybe falling back on exercise but my dad's been able to pretty consistently keep his weight down and has been for 2.5 years, and I've kept mine down at 105-115 for the past 2.5 as well when i used to weigh 130. The point is, your stomach usually expands or contracts to fit your new diet, it doesn't immediately revert back to its old fat self when youve decided you've lost enough weight. I can't binge like a pig anymore without feeling physically ill.


The weight-loss yo-yo effect is very real. It's fairly common for people to lose their willpower once they've lost a lot of weight, and fall back on their old habits because the old habits were "more comfortable." Old habits die hard, new habits are extremely tough to develop, and even once developed, can be easily let go if they are inferior in terms of comfort level, aka: (how long you've had them)

I fall into this category as well. I became very physically active and dropped from 246lb to 155lb in a little less than a year, and when winter came, I reverted back to my old habits since I had not developed a way of dealing with the winter season, short days, etc. I've still successfully maintained my weight at around ~165lbs for the past 9 months or so, but all of the awesome muscle I had built up is loooooong gone.

And it's true. Your stomach adapts to your diet. If you eat BIG, your stomach permanently expands after remembering the what kind of portions you consume, and conversely, it shrinks if you eat smaller meals. Your heart is the opposite though, the more athletic and extreme training you do, the larger your heart becomes to compensate for the need to maintain adequate circulation through slower beating but more blood volume being pumped per beat. This is why some high-end athletes have heart rates as low as 30-40 beats per minute, when the average heart rate is around 60 beats per minute.
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Posted 9/17/15
Speaking as a guy who weighed 300 pounds in his formative years and has since worked his way down to around 180 at the time of writing, I don't think "opressed" is the right word. They're made fun of and treated poorly in many a social circle, to be sure; but it's not like the police is more prejudiced against them or something.
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