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Post Reply Can fat people be Oppressed?
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Posted 9/18/15
I agree that oppressed isn't the right description. I don't think it is right to body shame anyone regardless of their size (thin or fat). Being disrespectful isn't right. I also don't think it is my place to judge another person. I do not live their life. I do not know their health situation. I yo yo in weight and personally I know that's when my holistic health is out of wack so I end up doing what I can to organise it better. I made sure I changed my job because one job left no time for me to do my own cooking and brought on stress that couldn't be properly dealt with. I'd noticed everyone there put on weight after a year or so. None of us was cooking that much we were all eating at work. It's all about balance. There is nothing wrong with a person being happy in their own skin. Happy doesn't mean that they won't make improvements.

Oh I recall seeing a documentary of a girl with an eating disorder. She was dangerously obese because of it. They got her stomach surgery so eventually she lost all that weight. The problem was she still had an eating disorder. It was just reversed. This time she became dangerously anorexic. No one had thought to deal with the root of the eating disorder whilst they dealt with her body.

It's good the OP's father realised he needed to make improvements and sorted it out. That was his individual self improvement. Other people's may not follow this model.
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Posted 9/18/15

animegirl2222 wrote:

Oppression is defined as being discriminated against for a trait you were born with more or less. The color of your skin. Your sexuality. Your gender identity. Etcetera. Being fat IS a choice.


So are we just going to ignore medical conditions like hypothyroidism? For those that don't know, hypothyroidism can cause rapid weight gain, fatigue, and can make it very difficult to lose that weight again. It's easy to say that 'anyone can do it!' when it comes to weight loss, without taking into account that for some people it is so much harder to do. When I was working out regularly, I didn't have any health problems. My joints were good, my thyroid is great, and I have a healthy heart. During my journey, I met so many people who weren't as lucky as I was. There was one woman for whom working out was so painful that she needed pain killers (I don't remember her exact medical condition, but it was certainly not an effect of her lifestyle choices).


Finny-sama wrote:

My main problem is that there are doctors who don't properly treat their patients because they think all their problems stem from being fat. Some do, but not all.
I read something about this girl who was having heart palpitations, but the doctor didn't think anything of it because she was overweight. The doctor just told her to exercise. They later found she actually had a hole in her heart, and the exercise was making it worse.. that's not okay.


This is an incredibly damaging form of discrimination against obese people. Some doctors forget that obesity and weight gain can be a symptom of an underlying health problem. Like another poster said, it's rare, but it's still a possibility. If she was obese, they should have been checking her heart anyway before recommending an exercise program. Heart issues and obesity often occur together. Telling this woman to exercise was the equivalent of telling someone with a torn ligament in their knee to keep running marathons.

My biggest problem with people shaming other people because of their weight is this: it is so easy to tell a smoker to stop smoking, isn't it? It's a whole lot harder to sit down with them, discuss why they smoke, and how you can work together using a mixture of medication and coping strategies that can work for that individual. Some people think that simply saying: "Eat less, exercise more!" is good for obese people because it seems like such a simple principle on the surface. However, it's so much more complicated than that. Doing anything to excess involved psychological factors that need to be addressed before you can make any meaningful changes.

A big part of my weight loss meant less carbs, more protein and fat. When I told my friend this, she laughed and said she eats a heavy carb diet and couldn't even imagine it. She's been underweight to average her entire life. I began to understand that what her body does with carbs is incredibly different to what my body does with them. Everyone is different, and needs a personalized plan not for weight loss, but to be healthy.

The only thing I could see turning around the obesity rates would be free dieticians and personal trainers for everyone who wanted one. You can't force it on them, but making is accessible is a great start.
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Posted 9/18/15
They're oppressed by gravity, that's for sure.
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Posted 9/18/15 , edited 9/18/15
Majority vs majority are pretty outdated terms. If the majority people in a country are poor, it doesn't mean there are privileges with being poor.

People discriminate against others because they made the decision to be a bigot that day. They were the ones discriminating, not the ones being discriminated against. People deny that fat people can have eating disorders which involves starving themselves, that’s harmful. Many people might even go a far a wanting them have it, hoping that it will make them lose weight.
Posted 9/18/15
i'm actually pretty fat... not obese or anything (although my BMI says im obese i don't consider myself obese because i have a metric fuckton of muscle) but i still am pretty fat. definitely overweight and have a lot of jiggle i could lose.

and despite that i still say that fat people aren't and can't be oppressed.

honestly yeah, it's possible, but for the most part no. the way i see that it's possible is via any sort of oppression that isn't the person's fault. on similar terms to things like mental defects/diseases (depression, bipolar, anxiety) or even such as autism and down's syndrome.

because, despite what people think, it's possible to be fat and not be at fault. some people can go an entire week without food and exercising 4 hours each day and still not lose weight. it's possible. it's very rare, but it's possible.

but, as for the majority, aka the people who don't suffer from the inability to lose weight? no, oppression doesn't exist there. the only thing that exists is extremely unhealthy habits that honestly deserve to be what most people call "fat shamed." like seriously. i'm 100% for "fat shaming" because if these people are seriously offended by other people shaming them because they're fat, then it'll be sort of an initiative for them to lose weight.

anyone who says things like "fat people just like to eat/have fun/any other excuse" are really just in denial. i mean sure, if you wanna say that these people who consume 5 cheeseburgers and two large fries from mcdonalds as a single meal are just doing so because they "like to have fun" then okay, believe what you will. but from the eyes of everyone else, that's just plain DISGUSTING. i honestly find more fun and enjoyment in eating healthy or eating very moderate doses of unhealthy food than i do in pigging out on portable heart disease (aka extremely unhealthy foods).


tl;dr fat people can't be oppressed. they just have extremely unhealthy habits and need to stop. it'd be like saying smokers can be oppressed, and a restaurant being 100% non-smoking is "discrimination towards the smokers."
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Posted 9/18/15

Saemonza wrote:

They're oppressed by gravity, that's for sure.


LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL
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Posted 9/18/15 , edited 9/18/15

theCannibal wrote:fat people can't be oppressed. they just have extremely unhealthy habits and need to stop. it'd be like saying smokers can be oppressed, and a restaurant being 100% non-smoking is "discrimination towards the smokers."


Yeah, you don't get oppressed for things you can actually physically change, if it'll help you be un-oppressed, not to mention healthier--
As for "social oppression", I look at the issue as "Nobody stuffed a Hostess Twinkie down your throat and made you black."
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Posted 9/18/15 , edited 9/18/15
I hope you people posting about medical conditions realize that those still are only affecting a small portion of the obese population.

Also I know someone with hyperthyroidism and she's able to stay perfectly healthy, her family eat mostly healthy food and she exercises routinely.

Most obese people are not made as such by a medical condition. Seriously. Even if they were, if their doctor and they themselves can help them overcome it, what's wrong with that?

( on a quick side note, thanks for fixing my typo in the thread title )
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Posted 9/18/15

animegirl2222 wrote:

Yay, another SJ or SJW related thread, depending on how you view things.

So, the last few years have given a rise to a new breed of slackivism, also called "Fat activism". This "movement", which doesn't require a lot of movement at all, is mainly performed by young women from behind a keyboard who weigh upward of 200 pounds, and are often qualified as highly overweight, if not mildly, moderately, or morbidly obese.

They however, do not think their extra weight to be a concern, but glorify it, while simultaneously putting down thinner people and society as a whole in the process, claiming that fat people are "oppressed" and thinner folks, average size folks, or even mildly overweight folks are "privileged", while they are a "marginalized" group according to some of them, who face "oppression".

The only problem is this: They're not a minority. Obese adults account for a whopping THIRD of the United States population and other western nations such as Canada are trailing behind, with a quarter of their pop being obese. Not only are they not a minority, but they are becoming a majority, though some of them also try and justify their reasoning with statistics that "the average US woman is 5'4" and 166 lbs" blah blah blah.

I will not deny that fatter people, especially obese people, are often denied positions and even occasionally teased, ridiculed for their weight, however, for MOST of them, this misery is self imposed. The majority of the obese western population are not fat naturally, but have made themselves as such through constant binge eating and refusing to control portions, as well as obviously getting no exercise, or else we'd have less of this problem.

Oppression is defined as being discriminated against for a trait you were born with more or less. The color of your skin. Your sexuality. Your gender identity. Etcetera. Being fat IS a choice. It's not "oppression" for people to find you unattractive as an overweight person, let alone an obese person. Most of the proponents of the "fat acceptance" or "health at every size" movement are the latter, often morbidly obese, and their morbid obesity is self imposed. In addition to promoting unhealthy lifestyles, they also put up bullshit claims that BMI is a "myth" and that weight loss can never result in success, claiming that those who lose weight will undeniably put it back on, which is also a lie. They also constantly put down those with restrictive eating disorders in order to project focus back unto themselves.

Do you think it's possible that these people could actually being oppressed, or do you find them to be annoyances?

I think the latter. Maybe it's just standing on the sidelines as the person they abhor, the 110 lbs girl who can scarf fast food, but I find them to be whiny little brats. Weight loss is possible. My dad did it, he was slightly obese and now maintains a healthy weight, and I was high "healthy" BMI before I lost weight as well, albeit not through the healthiest methods. These people and their brainwashing make me sick.

I agree with you. It's a vicious cycle to be quite honest. Both sides can be very mean to the other and both are discriminated against. I'm athletic and have a lot of muscles, but if I don't watch my carbs my muscles loose their definition. I get gruff from both skinny people and fat people. I have skinny and fat friends. I really don't care. It's just better to have self confidence. If you don't like something about yourself...change it. It's not society holding you back, it's yourself.
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Posted 9/21/15

netdisorder wrote:



Mattypee wrote:

Hunger is more hormone driven, but you're definitely on the right track.


Like that whole thing about how the color red makes people more interested in food? Or would that be more of a sensory-driven response?


Theres a hormone called Leptin that tells your body that you arent hungry any more.
If you've ever eaten a whole load of some kind of food, then been hungry an hour later, that was Leptin messing with you.
Likewise if you've ever woken up not-hungry despite being overdue for a meal, it was also Leptin.

It is produced to a large degree in fat cells, and this is how the body helps adjust itself, the more fat you have, the more leptin, the less you eat. Therefore you get less fat.
Problem for some people is that when they get too fat, or ignore the effects of Leptin and eat when not hungry, that the hormone Leptin stops working as well as it did, and their natural hunger set-point resets and they eat even more.
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Posted 9/21/15 , edited 9/21/15
im 5 1 and weigh 160 pounds, I used to be under weight -94 pounds- due to allergies. after I was put on 2 medicines within 3 months I gained 70 pounds, it was a side effect, I didn't gain it from eating because I hardly could eat anything. I have asthma which I was born with as well as a heart condition, neverthe less I do exercise 4-5 times a week, though it is hard to lose the weight.
my doctor whom I had when I was underweight said my health conditions were because of that, then when I gained the weight it was because I was "fat" , I have gotten different treatment because of it
I do agree in America there is a junk food problem and when real food is more expensive than fake and unhealthy sometimes its hard to avoid if you don't have much money
never the less I try
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Posted 9/21/15
Of course they are being oppressed, gravity is merciless to anything that is too large.
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Posted 9/21/15 , edited 9/21/15


    I'm not really concerned with how people live their lives or however they feel the most empowered, but they certainly can't preach that it's healthy, nor should they shame people outside of their group. Self confidence and self glorification are not synonymous. Unless they have a thyroid condition or medicine that is triggering weight gain, it's of their own volition that they're that way. There should be no activism. They're obese. Some people think obese is attractive, but on the whole people don't. Unlike most bona fide illnesses and physical conditions, obesity is something they can change, but choose not to. I'm not advocating the bullying of overweight individuals; I think it's cruel and unnecessary, but they're being a little hypocritical with their treatment of "skinny" women, honestly.
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Posted 9/21/15 , edited 9/21/15
Let's dig right to the core assumptions we're expected to make here:

-You cannot be oppressed on the basis of characteristics which are under your control <--------No.
-It is not possible to marginalise a majority group <-------------------- Yes, it is.
-There are health concerns that at least some advocates of the "fat acceptance" movement are downplaying or ignoring, which is a problem <---------------- Correct.

With that said, let's go over my answers to this topic again:

Yes, obese people can be oppressed. The assumption that one cannot be oppressed on the basis of characteristics under one's control is incorrect.

No, obese people are not currently oppressed even though they hypothetically could be.

Yes, obese people ought to be treated better by society than they currently are. Prejudice and rudeness against overweight people, while socially acceptable for the most part, is nevertheless unnecessary, destructive to the effort of promoting better public health, and makes assumptions about such peoples' character which may simply not be true.

No, people do not have the right to treat an obese person poorly on the basis of their weight without facing backlash for it. Being a rude asshole isn't supposed to be a badge of honour. That's not "telling it like it is". It's being a rude asshole.

Yes, there are legitimate health concerns surrounding obesity which shouldn't be downplayed or ignored for the sake of promoting better treatment of overweight people.

No, it is not inappropriate to attempt to promote healthier lifestyles as part of a campaign to improve public health.
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