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Georgia's only woman on death row is executed
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Posted 9/30/15 , edited 9/30/15
Taken from one of the comments, my thoughts exactly:


I don't want to sound insensitive, but, it seems as though once people get in prison, they find God and turn their lives around after having murdered someone. Why didn't you try and find God and talk to him PRIOR to killing someone? He was in the same place as he was when you found him in prison.

She didn't kill him herself, but yes she had a major role in it and for me, they should both be killed. She wanted to be spared because she "was a seriously damaged woman who has undergone a spiritual transformation in prison and has been a model prisoner who has shown remorse and provided hope to other inmates in their personal struggles. They gave the parole board testimonials from several women who were locked up as teens and who said Gissendaner counseled them through moments when they felt scared, lost or on the verge of giving up hope."

I'm glad she was able to help others during her time in prison, but that doesn't negate what she did. If that's the case, then can everybody just go out and kill whoever and how many ever people they wanted to and go sit in jail the rest of their lives as long as they find God while they are in there? Do you know how crowded the prison system would be?


I don't like how the title says "only woman" as if that makes it worse or sadder....I also know someone who went to jail, he repented and turned to God while he was in jail. That helped a lot for his freedom and after getting out of jail it only took him like 3 months to start doing the same thing he did before and became atheist again lol
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Posted 9/30/15 , edited 9/30/15
Holy fuck the media sure makes her out to be some sort of overly criminalized saint.


(b) In considering Gissendaner's role in the murder, we note several aggravating factors from the record. First, the record indicates that she was the moving force in the crime. Owen, her co-conspirator, testified that Gissendaner insisted her husband be murdered rather than divorced so that she would receive insurance money to pay off the mortgage on her home, although she learned after the murder that no such insurance policy was yet in force. Telephone records indicated that Gissendaner was with Owen when the two made plans for the murder from a bank of payphones and that Gissendaner called or paged Owen 65 times in the days leading up to the murder. On the night of the murder, Gissendaner drove Owen to her family's home, provided him with the murder weapons, and then left him inside the home to lie in wait for her husband while she left to establish an alibi. While out with her friends during the actual murder, Gissendaner resisted suggestions that the group reschedule their outing. When she returned, she immediately sent a numeric signal to Owen on his pager and then drove to the murder scene. Owen testified that she took a flashlight to inspect her husband's body to see that he was dead and assisted in burning her husband's automobile



(c) We conclude that the deliberate, even insistent, manner in which Gissendaner pursued her husband's death, the fact that the murder was the unprovoked and calculated killing of a close family member, the fact that she arranged the murder to obtain money, and the fact that she attempted to avoid responsibility for her conduct by suborning perjury and orchestrating violence against witnesses all weigh heavily against her claim that the death penalty in her case is disproportionate. Our review of the sentences imposed in similar cases in Georgia reveals that the death sentence imposed in Gissendaner's case, considering both the gravity of her crime and the apparent depravity of her character, is not disproportionate. OCGA 17-10-35 (c) (3). The cases appearing in the Appendix support this conclusion in that each involved the careful devising of a plan to kill, killing for the purpose of receiving something of monetary value, kidnapping with bodily injury, or causing or directing another to kill.


Read more here: http://murderpedia.org/female.G/g/gissendaner-kelly.htm



It's idiotic to suggest she should have been allowed out of prison after involvement in premeditated murder. For fucks sakes, she even did it for money. Prison isn't just a place for 'rehabilitation', it's to prevent assholes like her from hurting other people by keeping them locked up.

Rot in prison for her entire fucking life or death (whichever you find more 'nice'). Either way, she's a fucking piece of shit and not like the media portrays her.
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Posted 9/30/15 , edited 9/30/15
The death penalty seems to be on its way out, but I support it for the sake of proportionality of punishment. You just don't punish a person who committed a worse crime the same way as someone who committed a lesser crime. He deserves a more severe punishment.

To be clear, the death penalty should be seen as retribution, not revenge/vengeance. It is not characterized by an emotion-driven desire to "get even" and should not be viewed that way. Rather, it should be viewed as a natural and expected consequence. You put your hand on a hot stove and it burns your hand because that's just what it does, not because it has something against you. You commit a heinous crime and you are punished with the most severe of punishments because your crime was atrocious. Your action causes a consequence. You can't argue your way out of getting punished for something intentionally and wrongfully done by you by pointing fingers at how bad others are theoretically being.

I can understand arguments against the penalty, but most of the strong points seem to hinge on procedural issues, not moral issues.
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Posted 9/30/15 , edited 9/30/15

Morbidhanson wrote:

The death penalty seems to be on its way out, but I support it for the sake of proportionality of punishment. You just don't punish a person who committed a worse crime the same way as someone who committed a lesser crime. He deserves a more severe punishment.



Some background on that:


at 260 (8). The evidence showed that she repeatedly raised the option of murder in conversations with her co-conspirator and that she planned the murder. She and not her co-conspirator stood primarily to gain financially from the murder. The murder was planned against her close family member. See DeYoung v. State, 268 Ga. 780. Unlike her co-conspirator, who cooperated with authorities and confessed his guilt, Gissendaner devised a plan to suborn perjury and to do violence against witnesses. Id.; compare Moore v. State, 233 Ga. at 865. We also note that Gissendaner appealed to the jury's sense of justice by making the same argument of proportionality she makes to this Court and that the jury rejected the argument by its verdict. In light of all these circumstances, we conclude that Gissendaner's sentence was not impermissibly disproportionate to Owen's. See Carr v. State, 267 Ga. at 559 (11); see also Crowe v. State, 265 Ga. at 595 (24); compare Hall v. State, 241 Ga. at 259-260 (8).


Basically on the surface it probably looks like he deserves worse, but I'm sure the courts had quite a bit more to it, even perhaps more than I've quoted. This suggests since the sentence was based upon before, during and after the crime committed and not just the crime itself as most are basing it upon in this topic.

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Posted 9/30/15

PrinceJudar wrote:

Some background on that:


at 260 (8). The evidence showed that she repeatedly raised the option of murder in conversations with her co-conspirator and that she planned the murder. She and not her co-conspirator stood primarily to gain financially from the murder. The murder was planned against her close family member. See DeYoung v. State, 268 Ga. 780. Unlike her co-conspirator, who cooperated with authorities and confessed his guilt, Gissendaner devised a plan to suborn perjury and to do violence against witnesses. Id.; compare Moore v. State, 233 Ga. at 865. We also note that Gissendaner appealed to the jury's sense of justice by making the same argument of proportionality she makes to this Court and that the jury rejected the argument by its verdict. In light of all these circumstances, we conclude that Gissendaner's sentence was not impermissibly disproportionate to Owen's. See Carr v. State, 267 Ga. at 559 (11); see also Crowe v. State, 265 Ga. at 595 (24); compare Hall v. State, 241 Ga. at 259-260 (8).


Basically on the surface it probably looks like he deserves worse, but I'm sure the courts had quite a bit more to it, even perhaps more than I've quoted. This suggests since the sentence was based upon before, during and after the crime committed and not just the crime itself as most are basing it upon in this topic.



So, she should be punished more severely than the co-conspirator. Yes.
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Posted 9/30/15

Morbidhanson wrote:

So, she should be punished more severely than the co-conspirator. Yes.


Pretty much. I'm astounded how the media is making her out to be right now though, but then again it shouldn't be all that surprising. Fucking media.


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Posted 9/30/15

PrinceJudar wrote:


Morbidhanson wrote:

So, she should be punished more severely than the co-conspirator. Yes.


Pretty much. I'm astounded how the media is making her out to be right now though, but then again it shouldn't be all that surprising. Fucking media.




I also don't care that she's a woman. She could be an alien cyborg from two centuries into the future but she'd still deserve punishment.
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24 / M / USA
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Posted 9/30/15

Morbidhanson wrote:

I also don't care that she's a woman. She could be an alien cyborg from two centuries into the future but she'd still deserve punishment.


I'm the same way.



Of course the media starts having a spastic attack because it's a woman and starts painting this false narrative. Women statistically get lighter sentences than men for the same crime as it is. Oh gee, I wonder why.
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Posted 9/30/15

PrinceJudar wrote:


Morbidhanson wrote:

I also don't care that she's a woman. She could be an alien cyborg from two centuries into the future but she'd still deserve punishment.


I'm the same way.



Of course the media starts having a spastic attack because it's a woman and starts painting this false narrative. Women statistically get lighter sentences than men for the same crime as it is. Oh gee, I wonder why.


Women murderers are the worst way more dangerous and scary they plan their shit with to do list
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26 / F / Overlord's Castle
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Posted 9/30/15 , edited 9/30/15
You guys do realize they spend our tax dollars, aka our hard working money, to feed these psychopaths locked up in jail? Our jails are actually full. You complain about the death penalty, but honestly I think it needs to be used more.


Whatever happened to shoot first and ask questions later????
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Posted 9/30/15

PhantomGundam wrote:


byClear wrote:

I'm 100% for the death penalty, but they have to come up with a method that's more efficient then what we currently have. It hurts the prisoner for having to be locked up for so long after their crime and the tax payers because we have to pay for their care until the execution. I don't wanna have to pay for someone who we're gonna kill anyways.


It's more expensive to kill them than it is to keep them in prison all their lives. The death penalty is actually giving you the opposite of what you're asking for.


Not if they start using cheaper methods
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20 / Cold and High
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Posted 9/30/15

Dariamus wrote: The sad part is, they've held her for 18 years before executing her.

The whole thing should have been over and done with a decade ago.
The evil may sound horrible but the "clean" hell is even worse -state prison located somewhere...

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23 / M / Beyond The Wall
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Posted 9/30/15
Im all for the death penalty, I just hate that they made her wait 18 years.
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26 / M / Your friendly nei...
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Posted 9/30/15

Kira0309 wrote:

You guys do realize they spend our tax dollars, aka our hard working money, to feed these psychopaths locked up in jail? Our jails are actually full. You complain about the death penalty, but honestly I think it needs to be used more.


Whatever happened to shoot first and ask questions later????


I follow this policy.... minus the asking questions part, I find it unneccessary.
Posted 9/30/15
I'm more bothered by how it took them 18 years. She's guilty, what took so long? Because she was a girl? Because she told her boyfriend to be her proxy and do it for her? It was her idea and the only reason her BF killed was because she told him to.

"Kelly Gissendaner repeatedly pushed Owen in late 1996 to kill her husband rather than just divorcing him as Owen suggested, prosecutors have said. Acting on her instructions, Owen ambushed Douglas Gissendaner at Gissendaner's home, forced him to drive to a remote area and stabbed him multiple times, prosecutors said."

The guy suggested divorce, the girl said murder. The girl pushed murder because she didn't want to go through the drama and longevity of divorce paperwork. Ok. I'm looking forward to how the media will demonize the boyfriend instead the the one that said, "Hey go kill my husband. I'm already unfaithful."
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