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Post Reply The Armed Citizen
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Posted 10/10/15 , edited 10/10/15

kinga750 wrote:


VZ68 wrote:
Nope.

Sorry, not gonna get taxed for shit and giggles on a fucking right.


What tax? Are you saying you are against any further regulation on guns? I think people should be able to own guns, but refusing to regulate them properly is absurd. Why shouldn't we make every effort to make sure guns are sold only to those who can handle them responsibly?


If we restrict people that can handle them responsibly then we will have to disarm the government. Ever hear of operation "fast and the furious" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATF_gunwalking_scandal

We has gun dealers sell guns illegally to people so they could possibly catch the drug cartel bosses.... It didn't work and they used many of those weapons in shootings. So good job stopping gun smuggling when our own government is giving the bad guys weapons. Don't forget the los angeles police department got caught selling police equipment to unknown buyers....




"Gunwalking", or "letting guns walk", was a tactic of the Arizona Field Office of the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), which ran a series of sting operations[2][3] between 2006[4] and 2011[2][5] in the Tucson and Phoenix area where the ATF "purposely allowed licensed firearms dealers to sell weapons to illegal straw buyers, hoping to track the guns to Mexican drug cartel leaders and arrest them."[6] These operations were done under the umbrella of Project Gunrunner, a project intended to stem the flow of firearms into Mexico by interdicting straw purchasers and gun traffickers within the United States.[7] The Jacob Chambers Case began in October 2009 and eventually became known in February 2010 as "Operation Fast and Furious" after agents discovered Chambers and the other suspects under investigation belonged to a car club.[1]

The stated goal of allowing these purchases was to continue to track the firearms as they were transferred to higher-level traffickers and key figures in Mexican cartels, with the expectation that this would lead to their arrests and the dismantling of the cartels.[6][8][9] The tactic was questioned during the operations by a number of people, including ATF field agents and cooperating licensed gun dealers.[10][11][12][13][14] During Operation Fast and Furious, the largest "gunwalking" probe, the ATF monitored the sale of about 2,000[1]:203[15] firearms, of which only 710 were recovered as of February 2012.[1]:203 A number of straw purchasers have been arrested and indicted; however, as of October 2011, none of the targeted high-level cartel figures had been arrested.[6]

Guns tracked by the ATF have been found at crime scenes on both sides of the Mexico–United States border, and the scene where United States Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was killed December 2010. The "gunwalking" operations became public in the aftermath of Terry's murder.[2] Dissenting ATF agents came forward to Congress in response.[16][17] According to Humberto Benítez Treviño, former Mexican Attorney General and chair of the justice committee in the Chamber of Deputies, related firearms have been found at numerous crime scenes in Mexico where at least 150 Mexican civilians were maimed or killed.[18] Revelations of "gunwalking" led to controversy in both countries, and diplomatic relations were damaged.[2]
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Posted 10/11/15

Illegal guns are an entirely different issue. Everyone wishes we could stop illegal gun sales, even the NRA.

Government corruption is another issue too. So are failed operations. Again, nobody supports this, there is no debate about it. These things have nothing to do with regulating legal firearms.
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Posted 10/11/15 , edited 10/11/15

kinga750 wrote:


Illegal guns are an entirely different issue. Everyone wishes we could stop illegal gun sales, even the NRA.

Government corruption is another issue too. So are failed operations. Again, nobody supports this, there is no debate about it. These things have nothing to do with regulating legal firearms.

Those weren't illegal guns they were legal guns that the government forced gun shops to sell "illegally". Which means they legally forced them to sell illegal weapons making such sales legal. You can't get any more legal than having the US government issue a mandate saying you must sell them, now it is very ethically wrong.

It has a lot to do with regulating firearms. You say more laws will stop criminals from obtaining guns. Now let's say the government does something stupid like this again. That one stupid act will bypass all your laws and arm the criminals in the USA meanwhile law abiding citizens have been disarmed and are unable to fight back. Everything you did is now meaningless because of one department and our citizens are more in danger than ever before.
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Posted 10/11/15

Rujikin wrote:
It has a lot to do with regulating firearms. You say more laws will stop criminals from obtaining guns. Now let's say the government does something stupid like this again. That one stupid act will bypass all your laws and arm the criminals in the USA meanwhile law abiding citizens have been disarmed and are unable to fight back. Everything you did is now meaningless because of one department and our citizens are more in danger than ever before.


Everyone agrees we don't want the government messing up and supplying criminals with firearms. That has nothing to do with a broad regulatory program. Just because the government can subvert the law does not mean we shouldn't have laws. I'm also not suggesting we disarm anybody, not sure where you are getting that.
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Posted 10/11/15
I have two on me at all times.
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