Post Reply Comparing Anime to Real Life
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54 / M / East Coast
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Posted 10/11/15
Disclamer I did a Topic search and nothing matched ! If there is one let me know !

Comparing anime and reality has become an overuse critique comparing anime and real life !

Anime is fiction / fantasy unless other wise stated !

Anime along with Literature / Comics / TV / Movies / Web Media is fiction! It may be follow real life and forms a foundation but thereafter the issue of this cant happen because in real life it's impossible!

Again we would not have almost nothing to entertain us if that was true !

I am really amazed how people dont apply anime logic to a show ! It seems to be more of a problem in action / sci-fi / mystery / magical/ game genres !

Then a discuusion turns into a back and forth using reality when it shouldn't !

Yes there are homages to real life in some animes but the story is stiil fiction !

Even slice of life/ comedy a lot doesnt happen in real life !

So just watch and enjoy ! Use anime logic at all times!

You can critique the story / show adaption / animation but throw attempts at using realitly!
Posted 10/11/15 , edited 10/11/15
I don't get a word you're saying.


Okay, now I sorta get it.
xxJing 
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30 / M / Duckburg
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Posted 10/11/15 , edited 10/11/15
The problem isn't when an anime does the improbable, it's when it does the almost impossible.

When it contrives something so unlikely that it feels wrong even by the standards of the story.

There are times when an anime will set some ground rules for the story, and then break them because it's just easier to write that way. When any story does that, it loses integrity. The reader/watcher must at all times believe that the world inside the story is moving on it's own, and never realize that something happened because it was convenient for the author.
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27 / M / Northern Ireland
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Posted 10/11/15 , edited 10/11/15
Suspension of disbelief.

If it fits within the story, the rules establish therein and doesn't break your immersion then fine. On the other hand if it is jarring and takes you out of the experience then damn right you should call it out for it.

Unless it is for comedic purposes such as trope lampshading that is.
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28 / M / Winnipeg
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Posted 10/11/15 , edited 10/11/15
^^ Those two posts.

Whether it's animation, live-action, or text, breaking the rules of the story almost always draws negative attention.
It's not a matter of "That can't happen in real life!" It's a matter of "That couldn't even happen in this fictional world."
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22 / M
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Posted 10/11/15
Yeah, most of the time, when people say that something is "unrealistic," what they're really saying is "this breaks my suspension or disbelief," except they don't know the correct terminology. As mentioned above, each and every show will set ground rules for itself, unless the writer is going for something incredibly surreal, and, in exchange for this, the audience is excuses certain aspects of the show.

Let's look at Young Black Jack, the reviews for which OP has objected to. In general, this show cleaves fairly close to reality, and, in exchange, the audience is supposed to not object to Hazama's incredible skills, how many high-tension situations a med school student can get into, and the authors imperfect (but still researched) medical knowledge which is nearly inevitable for the genre. In particular, there are two situations so far that break suspension of disbelief for many reviewers.

1. The scene at the beginning of episode 1, in which nobody helps a kid who isn't getting off the train tracks. In this case, there are a lot of reviewers saying, "Well, of course, I would have jumped in to save the kid," or, "Why didn't anybody save the kid, since it's clear he was in danger?" The truth is, this probably shouldn't have broken suspension of disbelief, since such occurrences are documented under the Bystander Effect, which makes it less likely for individuals in a crowd to help someone in need.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect

2. The scene near the end of episode 2, which is a more serious break of SoD.
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こ ~ じ ~ か
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Posted 10/11/15
Time travel and memory erasure don't exist in real life, but I can still drop Charlotte because in combination, the two created a plot blackhole from which nothing could escape.
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18 / M / Somewhere in America
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Posted 10/11/15
im just here to say i have a Japanese transfer student in my school and we were doing a 'what is true or false about rumors in Japan" at a club and when i said the rumor that anime highschool is like Japanese highschool, she said yes.

All the people in the room who watched anime were confused but we couldnt really argue with her.....
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55 / M /
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Posted 10/11/15
I always thought that if RL was like anime then 70% of the adults would be alcoholics unless they're senseis then it jumps to 95%.
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Posted 10/11/15 , edited 10/11/15
Why are you yelling? -.-
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