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Post Reply Don't you think that autism shall be accepted?
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Posted 9/24/16 , edited 9/24/16

Arsam1114 wrote:



As long as I processed what you said enough and correctly, the answer is yes.
Most of them said for the reason why, is because it makes them who they are, and without it, they would be a whole different person. I am the same way, it makes me who I am, and I wouldn't accept $10,000 to cure it, some said the same on their own accord.




Seriously? You wouldn't want the shit that doesn't make sense to make sense, and the shit that's hard to make sense of be easy to understand, and take 10K into the bargain?

There's all sorts of crap I don't get. I'd take 10K and a nano-bot injection or whatever to sort it.

I guess I misunderstood earlier. Sorry for any confusion.
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Posted 9/24/16

BlueOni wrote:


Arsam1114 wrote:

Umm, I am autistic, and know many other autistic people. Please define the second sentence for me, before the comma.
I did a survey recently, most of us wouldn't accept a cure, a good chunk actually opposes a cure period. A couple even asked their kids, and they said the same thing for the most part. A lot of us are proud to be autistic, as it gives us some strengths. Now of course, I am not talking on behalf of every autistic person out there, because yes, there are some that wish they didn't have it.
I don't think we are that first part. You will need to elaborate on that for me to say something against it, lol.
I don't see them throwing parties saying let's have a party because we are autistic. No, we are not celebrating. Yes, when we get diagnosed with it, when expecting it, yes, they cheer, we are happy, they post about it, but they do not have a party. Autism is not a tragedy, ignorance like yours is. Fine, some people might see it as a tragedy, but most don't, they embrace it. You are correct when saying it's not some damn lottery prize.
(I can't say what you said, because the reply gets blocked if I do.)


So basically the idea is like deaf culture, then? The condition is so central to the way a person with it interacts with and perceives the world that it becomes an integral part of their identity that they wouldn't want to surrender even if they hypothetically could, because to do so would be to surrender a critically important piece of themselves while simultaneously launching them into circumstances they've never dealt with and have no preparedness whatsoever to handle or comprehend? And what's more, where some perceive the condition solely as a hindrance many among those who have it and those who live with/raise them have found, in addition to whatever burdens may be imposed, meaningful, valuable, and constructive characteristics and/or feelings that make things all worthwhile? For instance, one might have difficulty understanding or conforming to social conventions, but one might be incredibly talented at something that falls within the purview of an intensely focused interest?

If that's it then I think I understand and agree with the sentiment.


reading what you just said makes me think of it a little differently, I myself have it

I have always LOATHED it though, as soon as you open up and say you have it you get a certain look, and you are avoided like the plague,
growing up by adults and kids alike and even still to this day

I was told I have it because my mom "sinned"
I was told I had it because I "sinned" basically for existing -mind you I am still religious nonetheless-

on the other hand in my church ive been told god only gives disabilities to those he thinks are able to handle it

I don't think its a ....handicap, growing up it was but now I havelearned to cope with it, to the point I seem normal until I even say something in regards to having it


I guess I wouldn't want to be" cured" because its essentially a part of who I am, one way or another no matter how much I fucking hate the stigma
a lot of ....well 90 percent of my experiences growing up with it have molded me to be more tolerant, open minded , and in general able to mentally cope withthings more than the average person in some ways, albeit I feel like I have lost empathy because of having to cope so much
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Posted 9/24/16 , edited 9/24/16

CasualObserver wrote:


Arsam1114 wrote:



As long as I processed what you said enough and correctly, the answer is yes.
Most of them said for the reason why, is because it makes them who they are, and without it, they would be a whole different person. I am the same way, it makes me who I am, and I wouldn't accept $10,000 to cure it, some said the same on their own accord.




Seriously? You wouldn't want the shit that doesn't make sense to make sense, and the shit that's hard to make sense of be easy to understand, and take 10K into the bargain?

There's all sorts of crap I don't get. I'd take 10K and a nano-bot injection or whatever to sort it.

I guess I misunderstood earlier. Sorry for any confusion.


i mean sure i would but a cure to me would erase who i am so no thanks.
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Posted 9/24/16

BlueOni wrote:


Arsam1114 wrote:

Umm, I am autistic, and know many other autistic people. Please define the second sentence for me, before the comma.
I did a survey recently, most of us wouldn't accept a cure, a good chunk actually opposes a cure period. A couple even asked their kids, and they said the same thing for the most part. A lot of us are proud to be autistic, as it gives us some strengths. Now of course, I am not talking on behalf of every autistic person out there, because yes, there are some that wish they didn't have it.
I don't think we are that first part. You will need to elaborate on that for me to say something against it, lol.
I don't see them throwing parties saying let's have a party because we are autistic. No, we are not celebrating. Yes, when we get diagnosed with it, when expecting it, yes, they cheer, we are happy, they post about it, but they do not have a party. Autism is not a tragedy, ignorance like yours is. Fine, some people might see it as a tragedy, but most don't, they embrace it. You are correct when saying it's not some damn lottery prize.
(I can't say what you said, because the reply gets blocked if I do.)


So basically the idea is like deaf culture, then? The condition is so central to the way a person with it interacts with and perceives the world that it becomes an integral part of their identity that they wouldn't want to surrender even if they hypothetically could, because to do so would be to surrender a critically important piece of themselves while simultaneously launching them into circumstances they've never dealt with and have no preparedness whatsoever to handle or comprehend? And what's more, where some perceive the condition solely as a hindrance many among those who have it and those who live with/raise them have found, in addition to whatever burdens may be imposed, meaningful, valuable, and constructive characteristics and/or feelings that make things all worthwhile? For instance, one might have difficulty understanding or conforming to social conventions, but one might be incredibly talented at something that falls within the purview of an intensely focused interest?

If that's it then I think I understand and agree with the sentiment.


to an extent yes but some of us have found ways that being Autistic benefits us unlike being deaf
Posted 9/24/16 , edited 9/24/16
Autism as a condition is different for each person that has it. It is hard to generalise tbh

I think it's bad to say just because someone has autism that they aren't approachable.

I doubt it's easy to tell at first sight.
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Posted 9/24/16 , edited 9/24/16

Arsam1114 wrote:

As long as I processed what you said enough and correctly, the answer is yes.
Most of them said for the reason why, is because it makes them who they are, and without it, they would be a whole different person. I am the same way, it makes me who I am, and I wouldn't accept $10,000 to cure it, some said the same on their own accord.


I think I follow, then. Thank you very much for taking the time to explain.


redokami wrote:

reading what you just said makes me think of it a little differently, I myself have it

I have always LOATHED it though, as soon as you open up and say you have it you get a certain look, and you are avoided like the plague,
growing up by adults and kids alike and even still to this day

I was told I have it because my mom "sinned"
I was told I had it because I "sinned" basically for existing -mind you I am still religious nonetheless-

on the other hand in my church ive been told god only gives disabilities to those he thinks are able to handle it

I don't think its a ....handicap, growing up it was but now I havelearned to cope with it, to the point I seem normal until I even say something in regards to having it


I guess I wouldn't want to be" cured" because its essentially a part of who I am, one way or another no matter how much I fucking hate the stigma
a lot of ....well 90 percent of my experiences growing up with it have molded me to be more tolerant, open minded , and in general able to mentally cope withthings more than the average person in some ways, albeit I feel like I have lost empathy because of having to cope so much


Well, I'm glad to have helped. Thank you very much for explaining, too.

I will admit to no small amount of disgust at someone telling an autistic child that they're merely the byproduct of their own or their parents' sin, and frankly someone saying such things would get an earful were I present. Regardless, it seems you've found a support network and have figured out ways to deal with any problems you may come across, and that's wonderful. I really hope the stigma fades away and you don't have to deal with any more crap soon, I honestly do.


Ryulightorb wrote:

to an extent yes but some of us have found ways that being Autistic benefits us unlike being deaf :P


I think there are those among the deaf who would disagree that there are no benefits, but I'll let them speak for themselves if that's the case. As it is I'm just glad you're able to find meaning and value.
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Posted 9/24/16
Yes very much so because like everybody else, they just want to be accepted and find a place to fit. I have first-hand experience with autism because of my oldest sister.
Posted 9/25/16
It is something for all to want, isn't it? It could be in enough time, it is possible.
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Posted 10/2/16
it is already being accepted in the first place no ?
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Posted 10/2/16
I wonder how many people voted yes just because it is a norm?
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Posted 10/2/16
Well, it depends on what you mean. If you mean people should understand that autistic people think/act differently than yeah. But if you mean we shouldn't try to treat autistic people then no.
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Posted 10/3/16
I don't know.
Posted 10/3/16

redokami wrote:I was told I have it because my mom "sinned"


She feels like it's about her and she's being punished?
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Posted 10/3/16

Sir_jamesalot wrote:


redokami wrote:I was told I have it because my mom "sinned"


She feels like it's about her and she's being punished?


no we were told that by some Baptists, not westboro mind u
Posted 10/3/16

redokami wrote:


Sir_jamesalot wrote:


redokami wrote:I was told I have it because my mom "sinned"


She feels like it's about her and she's being punished?


no we were told that by some Baptists, not westboro mind u


Nobody knows medicine like random superstitious busybodies.
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