Post Reply choppy video
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21 / M / Ontario
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Posted 10/31/15
the videos here on crunchyroll for the pc even when i cleared cache cookies etc the video gets rather choppy
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Posted 11/27/15
same problem. On youtube I can watch 4K without buffering, it just streams. On CR even 720 lags like it's 2005
Der Zoodirektor
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Posted 11/27/15 , edited 11/27/15

olaSarcasm wrote:

same problem. On youtube I can watch 4K without buffering, it just streams. On CR even 720 lags like it's 2005


Have you tried using a different DNS server yet? Where do you get the data from? Can you run "nslookup cp150757.edgefcs.net" in command line and paste the output?
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Posted 11/27/15 , edited 12/19/15

shinryou wrote:


olaSarcasm wrote:

same problem. On youtube I can watch 4K without buffering, it just streams. On CR even 720 lags like it's 2005


Have you tried using a different DNS server yet? Where do you get the data from? Can you run "nslookup cp150757.edgefcs.net" in command line and paste the output?


something that looks like a python or an ipconfig window pops up and disappears, don't know about that.

Anyway that shouldn't really be necessary in the first place. It's annoying to pay for a streaming service when it's this slow.
Der Zoodirektor
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Posted 11/27/15
Not every ISPs immediately provides the best routing to certain providers. The longer the routing the less of a throughput you will have.

You have to open the command line first. Run "cmd", then enter "nslookup cp150757.edgefcs.net".
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Posted 11/29/15
What is going on, CR is choppy on all my devices no matter what rate setting. never had issues in past...
if this continuals then the premuim is a bust and not worth the aggravation.

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Posted 11/29/15 , edited 11/29/15
yup super choppy video here on cr using the browser, works flawless on the Roku, been experiencing this for two days but its really bad right now at the time of this posting.

40mb connection for me so it has to be the site.

nslookup
Name: cp150757.edgefcs.net
Address 1: 96.17.15.157 cp150757.edgefcs.net
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Posted 11/29/15
Also I just noticed if I don't use the option of the pop out window there are way fewer lag interruptions with the 720p.

Is it possible I was buffering two videos at the same time?
aciani 
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Posted 11/29/15 , edited 1/3/16
Laggy, choppy, jerky, etc. playback is certainly annoying, and can be quite a complex issue.

For the short, in this order:
1) Internet speed test (from the problem computer): 720p needs at least 2.0 Mbps. 1080p needs 5.0 Mbps. If pausing can alleviate the issue for a few minutes, then you may have slow or inconsistent download or LAN speeds.
2) Disable video smoothing (right click during playback). If the choppiness largely vanishes, disable compositing in your window manager. Video smoothing is default on CR player, and is enabled on every page load or reload. Compositing is a feature of your window manager (Aero on Windows, Quartz on Mac, various on Linux). Use your favorite search engine.
3) Disable compositing in your window manager (even if video smoothing seemed to do nothing).
4) Try alternate DNS servers, such as 4.2.2.2, 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4, other public DNS of your search engine's recommendation.

Choppy playback may originate from server overload, network delays or your computer hardware. If you want the details explaining why the above may or may not work, read on.

Server overload may occur when DNS servers point too many users to the same mirror (the same name may resolve to more than one address). Example, everyone using Comcast gets directed by Comcast's DNS servers to Mirror #1, and that's like 50% of the Internet in the USA, so if the other 50% of the Internet is split 50/50, Mirror #1 gets 75% of the traffic and Mirror #2 gets 25%. Result: Mirror #1 is overloaded. This is due to the resolution order in the cache of the individual DNS servers, so one solution is to switch DNS servers to an alternate public one, like 4.2.2.2, 8.8.8.8 or 8.8.4.4, which may, by luck, send you to the under-utilized mirror(s). You could try different DNS servers until it works or you give up. This has very little to do with routing. Network windows tend to be upwards of 2 MB, so even with high latency, there will be at least 2 MB in the pipe, assuming the server can pump it out and data corruption is low. Don't believe it? Try speed tests from different cities and providers. Longer routes will start out slower, but catch up quick as the amount of data in transit increases over a few seconds.

Download speed could be an intermittent problem, and should result in automatic reduction in resolution with smooth playback at the lower resolution. Run an Internet speed test from the problem computer to verify download speed. For 720p/1080p H.264, you should get 2.0/5.0 Mbps, as a minimum. The 1080p HD streams for U-verse use 12 Mbps, and 1080p BluRay uses 18 Mbps, for reference, but those are higher quality data streams than (most) internet video, and are also MPEG-2 (which requires higher data rates than H.264).

Hardware is tricky. It involves a combination of CPU, GPU, main memory and video memory. Most GPUs since ~2009 support partial or full hardware H.264 decompression and video scaling. Using a GPU with full hardware acceleration should support playback of 1080p H.264 while barely touching the CPU (perhaps requiring a 1.2 GHz Core 2 uno). Without GPU acceleration, a 2.5 GHz Core 2 duo would be an absolute minimum for 1080p, assuming a threaded player.

Beware compositing window managers, such as Aero (Windows). These window managers consume the same graphics resources used to accelerate H.264 video playback, especially graphics memory. On slower GPUs or ones with low memory (<256 MB), such as those embedded in motherboard chipsets, even full speed 720p H.264 playback may be impossible with compositing enabled. For example, a decoded 720p frame uses 30 MB. For compositing, this image is copied in video memory, along with images of every other open window. If running a 1280x720 desktop, every full-screen window uses another 30 MB; at a minimum, your desktop, web browser and full-screen Flash, totaling 90 MB. These are assigned transparency and summed into a final output image, so now 120 MB. The GPU-based H.264 decoding also requires memory, about twice the size of a frame, so another 60 MB, or 180 MB to this point. The card is also decoding the next frame while displaying the previous, so upwards of 210 MB of video memory may be required for 720p, with compositing enabled. The Crunchyroll player probably uses another two to three frames worth of memory for video smoothing, so add another 90 MB to the 210 MB. If you need 300 MB of graphics memory for 720p, you need 675 MB for 1080p, with compositing enabled. Much of this is allocated in main memory shared with the GPU, but as a video plays, the OS has to deal with filling it up and clearing it out, juggling it with the needs of other programs and data and file caches, and so sometimes it might take a second to make the required memory available.

Simple solutions: Reduce the resolution of your desktop to conserve video memory and GPU cycles (smaller images to be composited). Close unnecessary windows for the same reason (fewer images). Turn off smoothing (less memory and GPU load while decoding). If you have a fast CPU but slow GPU, turn off hardware acceleration. Turn off compositing while playing videos to reduce the GPU overhead and free up the most video memory. Use your favorite search engine to find out how. Key words are "turn", "off", "compositing", and the name of your OS.
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