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Wounds reopened? more often?
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Posted 11/7/15

Insanerino wrote:

You're talking about how people become traumatized and develop phobias in response to trauma. Both of those things are completely real.

All that mental wounds are is a sudden and harsh learning experience that left the psyche unable to cope normally and affected its usual behavior. We only define mental problems as behaviors outside of social norms, so its a gray area.

Lack of emotion, or when people don't seem to care, could be either nihilistic or sociopathic (depending on behavior) and can reveal itself when someone's reaction is the exact opposite of experiencing trauma. So yeah, some people become traumatized and fear things that have hurt them in the past, while others don't care at all. Healthy people can react normally when presented with something that traumatized them, but inside your mind a mental wound can never "be cured" (I think some people were already getting at that idea) .


People can be wired differently in a number of ways that change their subjective emotional experience. It isn't only nihilists or sociopaths that can have a very different emotional experience and/or presentation. I won't bore you with a wall of text explaining, but I have been rather thoroughly tested and am not a sociopath. I find nihilism boring and unattractive. I have been through things that give many people PTSD and was not deeply affected. I am often described as cold, robotic, clinical, analytical, etc. unless I make special effort to appear more normal (or as one friend dubs it "turn on the cosmetic features"). I still have feelings and they do affect me, it just seems that both the feelings and the way they impact me are a bit different than most.

As to "curing" mental wounds, we have data that shows that can indeed happen. The problem is that mental health sciences are still a relatively young field. The practice is as much an art as a science, so results from even proven techniques do vary. Our understanding grows every day, but we have a more incomplete picture in this discipline than many other disciplines do.
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20 / M / "10/10" - IGN
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Posted 11/7/15
Well said. For starters I would like to clarify that when I said "nihilists and sociopaths" I was talking specifically about people with no reaction to things most people would find traumatic (I use the term "lack of emotion" with the intention of "lack of emotion even in their own head").

Obviously those two aren't the only two categories dealing with "different emotional presentation", but sociopath is the definition of "lack of emotion" in a person when they should have emotion (again defined by social norms).

I'm going to have to full on dispute that mental health sciences are a young field. European psychologists established a baseline for classical psychology as early as a century ago. Granted that many of their theories are no longer widely accepted today, this does not mean that non of the studies done by classical psychologists are without merit. Let's note Pavlov, renowned for defining classical conditioning, practiced in the late 19th century. Sigmund Freud, remembered for his freudian concepts, also practiced psychology in the late 19th century.

I will concede that mental wounds can be cured. You can give people shock therapy, to disrupt and destroy neural channels which allow the normal (and sometimes stressful) thought process. Additionally, lobotomies can be performed, to completely render a person cured of all mental wounds and any illness.

However, I don't think a person can simply forget the pains of the past, naturally. Trauma is a type of learning, and the brain specializes in remembering the things its been taught; this prevents us from encountering further harm, because we've learned about it. A person can be considered normal, but at the very least inside their own head, they will never forget about the pains of the past and continue to apply that information into related situations.
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Posted 11/7/15 , edited 11/7/15

Insanerino wrote: they will never forget about the pains of the past and continue to apply that information into related situations.
past the life of existing
Air - Hane
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6Hg5tnJ3OA
which the unseen seem to teach the unforgettable XP

I would say depends on how the event was played out if you are going to keep or not doing the same "mistakes" for a repetive cycle.
MK is really messing with what you know or not and when such memories will play an impact.

Some of the same reasons sex slaves has some of their chances of getting messed up agian (addicted to or growing a liking to either pain or pleassure mostly a mix of both?)

have to find 2 movies making a good scene about those few things, first one is about some french guy meeting a younger girl and tells about their story to a younger guy, the second one is about a girl and familiy (dad is a dealer if you know what that means) ugh.. while the girl gets around a butterfly is helping her out (think a bit like the game until dawn)
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37 / M
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Posted 11/7/15 , edited 11/7/15

Insanerino wrote:

Well said. For starters I would like to clarify that when I said "nihilists and sociopaths" I was talking specifically about people with no reaction to things most people would find traumatic (I use the term "lack of emotion" with the intention of "lack of emotion even in their own head").

Obviously those two aren't the only two categories dealing with "different emotional presentation", but sociopath is the definition of "lack of emotion" in a person when they should have emotion (again defined by social norms).

I'm going to have to full on dispute that mental health sciences are a young field. European psychologists established a baseline for classical psychology as early as a century ago. Granted that many of their theories are no longer widely accepted today, this does not mean that non of the studies done by classical psychologists are without merit. Let's note Pavlov, renowned for defining classical conditioning, practiced in the late 19th century. Sigmund Freud, remembered for his freudian concepts, also practiced psychology in the late 19th century.

I will concede that mental wounds can be cured. You can give people shock therapy, to disrupt and destroy neural channels which allow the normal (and sometimes stressful) thought process. Additionally, lobotomies can be performed, to completely render a person cured of all mental wounds and any illness.

However, I don't think a person can simply forget the pains of the past, naturally. Trauma is a type of learning, and the brain specializes in remembering the things its been taught; this prevents us from encountering further harm, because we've learned about it. A person can be considered normal, but at the very least inside their own head, they will never forget about the pains of the past and continue to apply that information into related situations.


There is a reason I referred to them as a "relatively" young field. As compared to many other sciences and medicine in general, they are not nearly as well investigated nor as lengthy in pedigree.

There are a couple methods available using chemical inhalants and even using LSD that have been shown to be able to actually alter brain chemistry and to a lesser extent neurological pathways so as to provide permanent change in regards to trauma. It has successfully been used to treat both severe phobias and PTSD. PTSD has been shown to actually alter the brain to a degree that can have as much impact as a lesion. These therapies are apparently also able to alter the brain, if not as significantly as the initial gross trauma.

It has also been demonstrated that it is sometimes possible to achieve full amelioration of symptoms with a combination of talking, behavioral, and exposure therapies while using courses of medication. Unfortunately though results under these methods are not consistent and both success rate and recidivism vary greatly by practitioner.

We've come pretty far from lobotomies, but we still have quite a ways to go.

EDIT: Just for clarification, I don't disagree about remembering past experiences and applying that to the future. Trauma is usually a maladaptive version that has more negative consequences than positive ones. The goal of new therapies being developed like those I mentioned is to alter the intensity of the memories so as to prevent them from being traumatic. You don't forget them, but they soften a bit and seem a bit removed according to interviewed patients. It makes them tolerable and renders them less traumatic so that eventually they are simply more memories, if rather unpleasant ones.
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24 / M / Kaguya's Panties
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Posted 11/7/15
This thread reminds me of a video I saw of a frog being dropped into a tank of piranhas.
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