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Posted 11/10/15
A while back I interviewed Trina Robbins the first women to draw Wonder Woman comics... here is her website: http://www.trinarobbins.com/Trina_Robbins/Welcome.html there is a free graphic novel for download if you get bored.

Trina Robbins' views can be argued as "not current" but what is interesting is she does her "herstoric" research on females and feminism so if you don't like Trina you might find a lot of interesting names in her research and hopefully go from there.
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Posted 11/11/15 , edited 11/11/15

proxydata wrote:

A while back I interviewed Trina Robbins the first women to draw Wonder Woman comics... here is her website: http://www.trinarobbins.com/Trina_Robbins/Welcome.html there is a free graphic novel for download if you get bored.

Trina Robbins' views can be argued as "not current" but what is interesting is she does her "herstoric" research on females and feminism so if you don't like Trina you might find a lot of interesting names in her research and hopefully go from there.


That sounds fun, and yes following names to other sources is a good thing. Thank you.

Fun synchronicity: Having finally got around to reading the new Ms Marvel (well, as much as is available on Marvel Unlimited), I decided to poke around the original Ms Marvel and read issue 1 last night. It name dropped both Lynda Carter (who played Wonder Woman in the mid-seventies tv show) and Kate Millet, whose name I wouldn't have recognized except for PV naming her in this thread.
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Posted 11/11/15

PrinceJudar wrote:
I'm currently reading Gut Feminism by Elizabeth A. Wilson. At the very least, it's an interesting read. I much prefer books like this as someone in the hard sciences. So I'll recommend it. Empirical truths are best.


Thanks. I read the sample on Kindle, and that is an approach I haven't seen done before. I bought it it and plan to read it.


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Robin Morgan is also quite influential in the last couple decades, and notable includes

Melissa Farley
Shulamith Firestone
Catharine MacKinnon
Kate Millett
Rosetta Reitz
Gloria Steinem

I wouldn't consider them to be as radical as you'd want them, in fact some of them might have agreeable ideas.


I'm looking for a mix overall. Probably going to try to find a basic history (written recently so that it includes more recent stuff too), read some key works from a variety of times and perspectives and degrees of extreme. My request for some of the more radical stuff (those radical and hipster feminists on the internets) is because that's what I see castigated most often, and I want to see and evaluate what the fuss is about myself.

I recognize some of the names on your list, but Kate Millet was one I didn't. It was a fun bit of synchronicity that when I happened to be reading the first Ms Marvel (1977) last night, there was this:

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Posted 11/11/15

lorreen wrote:


proxydata wrote:

A while back I interviewed Trina Robbins the first women to draw Wonder Woman comics... here is her website: http://www.trinarobbins.com/Trina_Robbins/Welcome.html there is a free graphic novel for download if you get bored.

Trina Robbins' views can be argued as "not current" but what is interesting is she does her "herstoric" research on females and feminism so if you don't like Trina you might find a lot of interesting names in her research and hopefully go from there.


That sounds fun, and yes following names to other sources is a good thing. Thank you.

Fun synchronicity: Having finally got around to reading the new Ms Marvel (well, as much as is available on Marvel Unlimited), I decided to poke around the original Ms Marvel and read issue 1 last night. It name dropped both Lynda Carter (who played Wonder Woman in the mid-seventies tv show) and Kate Millet, whose name I wouldn't have recognized except for PV naming her in this thread.


Maybe try the new Wonder Woman series written by Meredith Finch, she promise to undo the damage by Azzarello, I've only skimmed her work on Wonder Woman and it did surprise me, i was a huge skeptic going in and even after meeting her in person.

For a good list of woman cartoonist check out "Pretty In Ink: Woman Cartoonist 1896- 2013" again Trina Robbins put together a very good list of notable woman cartoonist, check your library for the book.

Sadly: There is no current comic by Trina Robbins as a artist because she is determined never to draw again (shortly after Wonder Woman) the reason being she feels "unwanted" as a female artist in the comic book industry . . .

hope this helps and enjoy your time off
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Posted 11/12/15
Gloria Steinem was on The Daily Show recently promoting her new book My Life on the Road.
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Posted 11/24/15

Purryfur wrote:

I wish I could remember the author's name, but I recommend "The Politics of Sex." It may have been the result of her doctoral dissertation.


Thanks! Is that Sexual Politics by Kate Millet, by chance? I couldn't find a specific title The Politics of Sex.

If that's it, I've started it, and it's quite good and quite comprehensible.



Just got around to following your links. I don't think that one is what you intended! (But don't worry, you didn't accidentally send me a naughty imouto clip )
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Posted 11/29/15 , edited 11/29/15
No, my memory is somewhat scrambled by time and concussion. BUT!! I FOUND MY COPY!! The real title is, "Beyond Power: The Politics of Sex." The author is Marilyn French. And sorry about taking so long to get back to you: there is neither internet nor cell phone reception where my mother lives. Not a thing to be thankful for. Sigh.
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Posted 11/29/15

Purryfur wrote:

No, my memory is somewhat scrambled by time and concussion. BUT!! I FOUND MY COPY!! The real title is, "Beyond Power: The Politics of Sex." The author is Marilyn French. And sorry about taking so long to get back to you: there is neither internet nor cell phone reception where my mother lives. Not a thing to be thankful for. Sigh.


Thanks! I wonder if it's differently titled in different places, or got retitled in reprint or something, because what I find is Beyond Power: On Women, Men, and Morals; sadly doesn't seem to be a kindle version of that. But, I knew the name Marilyn French seemed super familiar. In my browsing I see she wrote the The Women's Room which was pretty popular and I'm pretty sure I read it ages and ages ago.
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Posted 11/29/15

lorreen wrote:


Purryfur wrote:

No, my memory is somewhat scrambled by time and concussion. BUT!! I FOUND MY COPY!! The real title is, "Beyond Power: The Politics of Sex." The author is Marilyn French. And sorry about taking so long to get back to you: there is neither internet nor cell phone reception where my mother lives. Not a thing to be thankful for. Sigh.


Thanks! I wonder if it's differently titled in different places, or got retitled in reprint or something, because what I find is Beyond Power: On Women, Men, and Morals; sadly doesn't seem to be a kindle version of that. But, I knew the name Marilyn French seemed super familiar. In my browsing I see she wrote the The Women's Room which was pretty popular and I'm pretty sure I read it ages and ages ago.


I haven't figured out how to crop the quotes. *tears of frustration roll down face* Apparently I have unique thought processes.

Yep, that's the one. It's two inches thick in its compressed state. (I had it squeezed in between The Poetic Edda and The Voice of the Middle Ages . No idea why.) She had completed The Book as World: James Joyce's Ulysses, The Women's Room, The Bleeding Heart, and Shakespeare's Division of Experience before Power . Since that one was published 1985 and I haven't read any of the previous books, I have no idea if any of them will be of any help or, indeed, even in print. Used book stores may be the only hope. ....Maybe the Gutenberg Project could have it???
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Posted 11/29/15 , edited 11/29/15

Purryfur wrote:
Yep, that's the one. It's two inches thick in its compressed state. (I had it squeezed in between The Poetic Edda and The Voice of the Middle Ages . No idea why.) She had completed The Book as World: James Joyce's Ulysses, The Women's Room, The Bleeding Heart, and Shakespeare's Division of Experience before Power . Since that one was published 1985 and I haven't read any of the previous books, I have no idea if any of them will be of any help or, indeed, even in print. Used book stores may be the only hope. ....Maybe the Gutenberg Project could have it???


Yes, I can definitely get a paperback copy. Shouldn't be old enough for Project Gutenberg though.

(Re removing stuff in quotes--it's just manually editing. Not really necessary unless you are quoting something very long, or several levels of quotes).

Anyway, here's an update for everybody, now that my educational vacation is over. I really appreciate all the starting points everyone shared, and I did some wanderings from there.

I found some really good stuff in terms of basic background and getting a feel for things. Didn't find time to do much tumblr poking, but I did a toe-dip and 'll get around to something more extensive soon. It's a topic that interests me and the reading I did manage wasn't at all a chore.

Books I finished:
Feminism Unfinished by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Linda Gordon, Astrid Henry. This was an excellent short history.

Heartbreak by Andrea Dworkin. Basically a series of vignettes forming a short memoir. Although I don't agree with all of Dworkin's conclusions in terms of her activism, this little book gave a much better sense of where her strong feelings came from, and I can sympathize even without agreeing.

Inspired by Andrea Dworkin by Susie Bright. Some short essays from a very sex-positive viewpoint. I was familiar with Susie Bright already and this was a fun read.

Books I've started:
My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem
Intercourse by Andrea Dworkin
Gut Feminism by Elizabeth Dworkin
Women's Studies: The Basics by Bonnie G. Smith
The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan
Sexual Politics by Kate Millett
The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir
Reconstructing Gender: A Multicultural Anthology by Estelle Dische (ed)
Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center by Bell Hooks
Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism by Bell Hooks

I'm getting a new Kindle, and I'll be putting it to good use!
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Posted 7/16/16 , edited 7/16/16

PrinceJudar wrote:

I've read too many with fee-fee based anecdotes and writings--beware the best sellers.

I'm currently reading Gut Feminism by Elizabeth A. Wilson. At the very least, it's an interesting read. I much prefer books like this as someone in the hard sciences. So I'll recommend it. Empirical truths are best.

Review:
"From organ speech to enteric moods, the gut is minded and the mind gutted by this book. It promises and delivers readings of biochemistry, pharmacology, anatomy, and psychoanalysis as strange matters that are unsettling to biology and feminism alike. Provocative in its diagnosis of the rejection of biology in feminist theory, I expect many readers will both devour this book, and throw it around the room a little."
(Hannah Landecker, author of Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies)



Sooooo. Although I bought it right away it took me a while to really get going, and then there were lulls. But I finished it. It was a hard read. I think partly because of insufficient background (on my part) both in medical and psychological sciences, and in the specific parts of feminism she referred back to. But I also think she didn't lay out her premise quite as clearly as I think would have made sense. Perhaps she was assuming certain things on the part of the reader--such as that they would have more of a background. Also, her prose style seemed a bit fuzzy and academic and technical all at the same time. To be honest, I think I got more out of reading the endnotes (which were very clearly written) than out of the book itself

With regard to the muddy prose, I wonder if that was because she was struggling to clearly articulate what she was moving toward and how the chapter at hand fit into that.

Anyway it kind of boiled down to "it's complicated" and "embrace the power of and" -- which I'm okay with. However, I was very disappointed that with "Feminism" prominently in the title she didn't spend more time explicitly presenting those ideas of feminism regarding depression/mental health that this book seemed intended to address or engage with/against.

Finally, thanks for the recommendation; it's always interesting to try out something one might never have considered on one's own.
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