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Post Reply Which Martial Arts have you trained in?
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23 / M / UK
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Posted 11/8/15
So when I was younger I was really into fighting and Martial Arts, but do to costs and other priority's I no longer had the free time. I've been really keen to get back into training for awhile but not sure what Martial Arts specifically to get into, Plus I wanna hear some story's from you guys to help narrow my decision of what style to take up.



Which Martial Arts have you trained previously or currently??


can you give me some detail like:
- Age when you started
- How Regularly & how long for
- Pros/Cons


Also are there other Styles that your interested in. If so what Martial Arts??


Looking forward to your posts
Thanks
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20 / M / Norway
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Posted 11/8/15
Throwing dynamite.
started age of 15.
for like 2 months every friday.
Pros: As long as it works
Cons: Ain't really a martial art.
mrc4nl 
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24 / M / The Netherlands
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Posted 11/8/15
1.Judo.
2. its soo long ago its hard to recall , i was ~ 8-10 years old
3. after 2 years i stopped. and started badminton.
4. its a defence sport, and not about hurting others. guess thats a pro.

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M / The Nightosphere
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Posted 11/8/15
I've trained in both Tae Kwon Do and Judo, as well as Ju Jitsu when I was younger. I don't remember when I started or stopped training in either of the three, but I remember training in Tae Kwon Do and Judo for several years. It was pretty regular since all of them had multiple classes per week.

List of Pros and Cons from personal experience.

Tae Kwon Do
Pros:
-Good training for muscles, endurance, balance, reflexes, etc.
-Learn to fight effectively in hand-to-hand
-Good self defense techniques

Cons:
-Really need to put in an effort to get good
-Lots of bruises, occasional broken bone

Judo
Pros:
-Good training for muscles, endurance, balance, reflexes, etc.
-Learn to fight without sustaining injury or injuring the other party too much

Cons:
-Concussions, lots of them if you are not careful/focused
-Not as effective if opponent is armed

Ju Jitsu
Pros:
-Learn many joint locks (headlocks, armbars, etc.)

Cons:
-Not as practical as the other two

If you're looking to get into martial arts and are not interested in anything in particular, I'd recommend Tae Kwon Do

Hope this helps.

(p.s. A broken toe hurts like a bitch.)
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16 / M / U.A Highschool
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Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/17/15
Killing everything in one punch
started at the age of 15
100 squats
100 push-ups
10k runs every day

Pros: Everything dies in one punch
Cons:everything dies in one punch...it also really isnt much of martial art
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21 / Australia
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Posted 11/8/15

Mrcreepday wrote:

Throwing dynamite.
started age of 15.
for like 2 months every friday.
Pros: As long as it works
Cons: Ain't really a martial art.


WUT

I mean are we talking about explosive dynamite or what? lol.
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20 / M / Norway
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Posted 11/8/15

GrandMasterTime wrote:


Mrcreepday wrote:

Throwing dynamite.
started age of 15.
for like 2 months every friday.
Pros: As long as it works
Cons: Ain't really a martial art.


WUT

I mean are we talking about explosive dynamite or what? lol.



Reference to this xD
Sogno- 
45682 cr points
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Posted 11/8/15
um i took a semester of karate in college

lol
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21 / Australia
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Posted 11/8/15

Oh thought you legit just decided to go outside and throw some dynamite around at the age of 15 and become some sort of explosives master, haha.
Posted 11/8/15
I've done Muay Thai and Tai Chi but that was a long time ago...although I would love to pick Martial Arts back up again.
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24 / M / Scotland
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Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/8/15
I did Wing Chun at one point

- Age when you started
about 11 years old.

- How Regularly & how long for
Went to class every Tuesday and Thursday. Ended up leaving after about 3 years due to money problems

- Pros/Cons
It's very street fighty. No jumping kicks or anything fancy, it's mostly about putting a lot of power or speed into the right places. Unfortunatley that made it very dirty too - to the point where light sparring was the most we could do to practice it. We mostly learned techniques and got out fitness up. Due to it's straight forward nature, it could be practiced by anybody of any age. We needed strength though.

I also do HEMA (Historical European Martial arts) now if that counts. Our focus is mainly on German Longsword but I've learned a bit of knife fighting, Scottish broadsword and dutch bar brawling - yes that's a thing and it's awesome.

- Age when you started
Just after turning 18
- How Regularly & how long for
every Wednesday
- Pros/Cons
It's very fun. Charging into battle with a longsword is a brilliant rush. We learn the historical techniques used over the centuries and try to figure out how they work. Sparring is common and very helpful. A large variety of martial arts is taught here - from german wrestling to sickle fighting. However, the warm up is devastating (albiet this is probably only for our specific HEMA club) with us often being told to do about 60 push ups, 60 sit up and plank for about 30 seconds in a day along with a lot of running (albiet mixed up a bit) - often with variations such as what we call tokyo riot press ups. Equipment is expensive (albiet the club does let you borrow some so you don't need it as such) and things such as bruises and pain are almost every day occurances. These swords may be plastic but they still cut through skin if you're not careful - steel swords are worse as my main instructor has many injuries that go to the bone. The worst we've had was due to wrestling next to a radiator though - sombody split their head open after a throw. It's also useless in reality - with exception of Dutch bar brawling (which was written by a dutch guy who went to Germany just to cause fights and find what worked), German wrestling and walking stick if you carry one of those.
Banned
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 11/8/15
I took up Jeet Kune Do training around the age of six. Cause my adopted father insisted I learn how to defend myself and asked me to pick a fighting style. We had just finished watching Enter the Dragon that day and I remember thinking Bruce Lee was awesome, so it became Jeet Kune Do for me. I haven't looked back since nor have I stopped.

Pros

Efficiency- Jeet Kune Do practitioners are taught not to waste energy with the showy flashy moves of some martial arts schools. Everything, and I mean everything is meant to have purpose. That purpose being the ending of the fight, there is no other intention but to be victorious.

Realism- A practitioner is taught what works, not what will win him or her a competition. Full contact gear is used and no punches are pulled and your sparring partner will be doing their utmost to hurt and incapacitate you.

Simplicity and Originality- In Jeet Kune Do one is allowed after showing sufficient skill to basically disregard what they think does not fit their personal needs and or abilities. You're not held down to some dead man's way of fighting but are rather allowed to fight in the manner you find easiest. The ultimate goal is to fight without overcomplicating the matter.

Con
Personally I think the only Con is that Jeet Kune Do is only for those capable of self expression in the way they fight. Jeet Kune Do isn't about learning some move list created by a man a thousand years dead, Rather it is about learning to harness what your strengths are and turn your weakness into strength. It is largely a self taught process after a certain while and some find that daunting I suppose.
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Posted 11/8/15
I'm extremely new to Marozzo and a couple other Western Martial arts that I haven't studied long enough to even say I've started training.

Marozzo is beautiful though Look at this sexy thing

Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/8/15
1.) Did Muay Thai for a bit, but not enough to learn anything
2.) 3 hours a day, 4 times a week, for half a year
3.) Pros: Full-contact, Cons: Full-contact
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27 / M
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Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/8/15
Age started: 10
I continued until I was 18 or 19 or so.

Styles: Kendo, Shaolin kempo karate, TKD, ninjutsu

Went to the dojo 2-3 times a week. Trained with friends in same class independently a few times a week. I had the most experience with Shaolin kempo and kendo.

Kendo
+Very cool
+Brutal and effective sword techniques can be honed through sparring
+Equipment is fun to wear
+Funnest sparring of all styles I dabbled in
-Live blades and gear are expensive
-It's easy to hurt yourself with a real sword
-Iaijutsu is difficult (for me, at least)
-TONS of practice is involved, the weapon needs to feel like an extension of your body and you must rely on it
-Forms are super boring (generally true in all styles)
-Real sword fighting isn't as glamorous as people seem to believe

Shaolin Kempo
+Very well-rounded style
+Fairly easy to learn
+No retarded things like board breaking (but we did that in our spare time anyway)
+Emphasis on functionality
+Incorporates necessary skills for modern self-defense, like disarming knife and gun-wielding enemies
+Teaches you the best way to take a hit and how to handle injury
+My instructor incorporated bone conditioning and flexibility training
-Forms are super boring
-Not as much rigorous training of the muscles
-Deeper stances feel impractical and tiring
-Some defensive maneuvers involve higher kicks than I'd like and grappling techniques that require perfect precision to be effective
-Not flashy
-Slow belt progression, lots of stuff to learn

TKD
+You move up ranks fast
+Flexibility training is valuable
+Builds good leg strength and reaction time
-Those ridiculous kicks....
-Fewer hand/arm techniques were taught
-Forms are super boring

Ninjutsu
+Very cool
+You can learn surprising tricks like silent walking, running, and climbing, weapons concealment
+Every strike is intended to outright kill or very seriously injure the enemy
+Not as many forms
-LOTS of disciplines other than ones intended for direct fighting, perhaps not as practical for self-defense unless you focus on the strikes (and maybe running/climbing techniques to escape confrontation)
-You need to have extreme awareness of your body, lots of fine muscle control involved in the silent techniques
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