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Post Reply Which Martial Arts have you trained in?
Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/8/15

Nyanotic wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:


Nyanotic wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:


Nyanotic wrote:


Morbidhanson wrote:

TKD
+You move up ranks fast
+Flexibility training is valuable
+Builds good leg strength and reaction time
-Those ridiculous kicks....
-Fewer hand/arm techniques were taught
-Forms are super boring


Ridiculous kicks? I have no idea what you're talking about.




Good in theory bad in practice. To pull it off you need speed and timing. Fuck ether of those and you are in for a world of hurt. It can be effective assuming your opponent isn't fast or has the reflexes to react in time. I can see different ways to defeat that move. Most of them are simply to do, unless you go for the painful ones. Also grabbing a leg in mid air is quite easy if you have the speed reflexes and coordination.

Thou if you do manage to pull it off, you probably are doing some serious damage and get cool points. If you pull it off that is.


I wouldn't try grabbing someone's leg mid-kick, believe me; it doesn't work (and is quite painful too).

However, I agree that it is very impractical and that pulling it off gets you at least +20 cool points. Back when I still trained, I saw a few people pull this kind of crap in well-rehearsed demonstrations but never when sparring.




I had grab my superior leg during a mid-kick. In a Jujitsu sparring with him. I let him hit me and them put my entire arm against it, pushing it against my side of my body. You know the block you do to stop a hit on your ribs ? I use that block has soon has he hit me and push it against my ribs side more than I normally would if I was blocking normally. I then proceed to pull him to me while simultaneously hit him several times with a turn punch with my knuckles facing downward. He never again try to kick me. If you are wondering why I let him hit me. Is payback. He hit me in the stomach with his kneed several times, blowing up the air out my body. Early in the sparring.


Maybe inJujitsu but in TKD it isn't a practical move. From what I understand, you still take the force of the kick to your ribs which, most times, is a point for your opponent. Even if you do successfully grab the leg, you can't really do much because grabbing a limb is against the rules in a proper match anyway.


We were no competing. And that time of the week we where using the room for a practice sparring. Between him and me. I think it was early in the morning. So no referee or rules. It was simply him and me, and some protection gear. The Sensei say has long has we use protection gear and isn't during class time. We could have a sparring.
Note that the Jujitsu school I was going was a bit hardcore. Like hitting hard stuff to make our palm and fist stronger. Also that was a long time ago, so I don't know if my martial art school was like the rest. All I know for sure was that it was a very traditional school with harsh straining. Hardcore discipline too. The only other things I know for sure is that my Sensei took straining under a Japanese jujitsu master. Witch may explain why my parring was different than what normal.
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Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/8/15

Nyanotic wrote:



Since I have no experience with Karate, forgive my ignorance but I disagree. In TKD kicks are slow if you have sloppy form or heavy feet, but a basic roundhouse, side, or hook kick are extremely fast when executed well and you need very sharp reflexes to even block them, let alone dodge. They only slow down if you start adding steps to cover distance or spins to increase power behind the kick.

(However, this may only be the case because TKD is a very kicking-oriented martial art.)



I have to agree with those disregarding the effectiveness of kicks. They are easy enough to dodge and preforming one means giving up control of the centreline, a death sentence. And what's more for that split second it takes your leg to reconnect with the ground your balance is compromised to quite a significant degree.
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Posted 11/8/15
Took Muay Thai for like 2 weeks..,
Then the instructor ran away to sweden or something...
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Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/8/15

Nyanotic wrote:


Since I have no experience with Karate, forgive my ignorance but I disagree. In TKD kicks are slow if you have sloppy form or heavy feet, but a basic roundhouse, side, or hook kick are extremely fast when executed well and you need very sharp reflexes to even block them, let alone dodge. They only slow down if you start adding steps to cover distance or spins to increase power behind the kick.

(However, this may only be the case because TKD is a very kicking-oriented martial art.)



Kicks are like punches in that you can train to enhance their effectiveness. Kicks are initially slow and punches are initially weak, it's the training and conditioning that make them effective. Kicking is just less intuitive than punching. Sort of like trying to punch with your non-dominant hand. Kicks will always be slower than punches if you've trained your arms and legs equally, but the power is what makes them worth using sometimes. Assuming your opponent knows what he's doing, it's a bad idea to throw out high kicks, but the legs are still weapons that are effective against the lower body.
Posted 11/8/15

Morbidhanson wrote:


Nyanotic wrote:


Since I have no experience with Karate, forgive my ignorance but I disagree. In TKD kicks are slow if you have sloppy form or heavy feet, but a basic roundhouse, side, or hook kick are extremely fast when executed well and you need very sharp reflexes to even block them, let alone dodge. They only slow down if you start adding steps to cover distance or spins to increase power behind the kick.

(However, this may only be the case because TKD is a very kicking-oriented martial art.)



Kicks are like punches in that you can train to enhance their effectiveness. Kicks are initially slow and punches are initially weak, it's the training and conditioning that make them effective. Kicking is just less intuitive than punching. Sort of like trying to punch with your non-dominant hand. Kicks will always be slower than punches if you've trained your arms and legs equally, but the power is what makes them worth using sometimes. Assuming your opponent knows what he's doing, it's a bad idea to throw out high kicks, but the legs are still weapons that are effective against the lower body.


Unless you are Anderson Silva. God that image of the leg breaking apart is bad.
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Posted 11/8/15

KarenAraragi wrote:

Unless you are Anderson Silva. God that image of the leg breaking apart is bad.


His leg turned into a noodle. I still remember seeing that the first time and cringing.
Posted 11/8/15

Morbidhanson wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:

Unless you are Anderson Silva. God that image of the leg breaking apart is bad.


His leg turned into a noodle. I still remember seeing that the first time and cringing.


When I saw him try I think to kick the other dude leg. I knew he fuck up. My arm breaking in 4 place was bad but his injure was more cringe worthy. I mean his arrogance he being displaying in the ring. Like applauding or saying shit to the opponent. If Karma is real, that was karma.
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Posted 11/8/15 , edited 11/8/15

Goju-Ryu Karate with dash of Muay Thai and Judo to the Instructor's taste.
- 8
- 8 years, 2-3 days a week when I was starting. 3-4 when I left being a student teacher on an off day.
- Pros/Cons

+Very solid strikes
+Easy to pick up basics. Moves tend to static and separated, so they're easy to breakdown for teaching.
-Throws are a bit limited until you blend in some from other styles.
-Some of the stances required very good balance for any sort of practical use.

It never got old being in a points based matched off who could make the first debilitating contact blow. Just sit back in a Muay Thai style stance and out range a boxers stance. If they stepped closer you just change your weight from the ball of your back foot to ball of your front foot and you tended to be in elbow/ throw range.

I focused more heavily on kicks and throws when I got higher up, and had a buddy who tried to stay with hand strikes as possible. He always said I was the most frustrating sparring partner in the dojo.
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Posted 11/9/15
Started martial arts when I was 10 or 11. Still currently training at the age of 31 as a Ninpo/Jujutsu instructor.

Past Styles: Taekwondo, Boxing
Current Styles: Ninjutsu/Ninpo, Jujutsu
Combined Experience: 10 years

Taekwondo:
+ Great to burn excess energy as a child
+ Plenty of leg flexibility
+ Tournaments/competitions can be fun
+ Flashy techniques make for fun videos
- Lots of wasted energy in techniques
- Countered by too many other martial arts today

Boxing:
+ Handy skill to know in order to build upon further with other martial arts
+ Quick hands
+ Good head movement
+ Aggressive style which often flusters inexperienced traditional martial artists
+ Excellent workouts
- Poor bodily preservation (short and long term)
- Far too limited as a single style to be considered practical in actual combat
- Easily open to getting kicked in the legs or taken to the ground
- Limited number of attacks

Ninjutsu:
+ Incredibly diverse (always an option to use a counter-style to opponent's style)
+ Includes taijutsu, grappling, bikenjutsu, bojutsu, shurikenjutsu, aikijutsu, jutaijutsu, jujutsu, and tons more
+ Focused on actual combat (not sport)
+ Great for self-preservation (body and mind)
+ Strength is not required (even more practical for women/kunoichi) since most techniques revolve around attacking pressure points/nerves/joints
+ Very practical approach to combat
+ Tests challenge you
+ Most techniques are lethal
+ Learn to face multiple opponents
+ Every single one of your joints becomes incredibly and awkwardly flexible
- Takes long time to become proficient due to diverse sets of techniques
- Poor reputation in modern martial arts world due to Bujinkan's global quality control issues (Genbukan & Jinenkan offer substantially better training as a whole (excluding individual teachers))
- Too many people busy fantasizing about ninja instead of training
- Tough to find a school near you, let alone a good one
- Bad choice if you want to fight in a ring

Jujutsu:
+ One of the most sought after styles today by law enforcement and military around the world
+ Made for the battlefield (as opposed to BJJ), e.g., JJ = Your opponent goes down, BJJ = You go down with your opponent
+ Redirecting opponent's energy to take them down (little to no excess energy used)
+ Brutal joint locks
+ Great skill to have when combining with some striking arts
- Can be challenging for a novice/intermediate practitioner facing a heavy striker if JJ is only skill
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Posted 11/9/15 , edited 11/9/15
oh man its been a while, used to train in Chinese Kenpo, boxing and bodybulder. I LOVVVe working out as bodybuilder.. But once I had Diabetes I couldn't even do 15 min warm up! its like my body falling apart! NO I don't do illegal Drugs!

I found out that my both grandfather had diabetes.. and it usually skip generation, that why my father and mother didn't get it..

So I lost the Will Power to do anything! I'm just like Juza the Cloud! Well yes I have been heart broken that push me back too!

You guys/ladies have no idea how lucky you are to not have daibetes! I willing to do anything to get rid of it...well I still accept Jesus Christ as my lord and savior.

Anyway Sorry to say it everyone.. Juza the Cloud Self-Taught Martial Arts is better than everyone! :D



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Posted 11/9/15

demo_Animation wrote:

Took Muay Thai for like 2 weeks..,
Then the instructor ran away to sweden or something...



Sounded like he was scammer took all your money and left town! XD Or running away from the Law..
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Posted 11/9/15 , edited 11/9/15
I curl up in the fetal position like this badass.

Been doing it for nearly 30 years.
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Posted 11/9/15

Morbidhanson wrote:


Nyanotic wrote:


Since I have no experience with Karate, forgive my ignorance but I disagree. In TKD kicks are slow if you have sloppy form or heavy feet, but a basic roundhouse, side, or hook kick are extremely fast when executed well and you need very sharp reflexes to even block them, let alone dodge. They only slow down if you start adding steps to cover distance or spins to increase power behind the kick.

(However, this may only be the case because TKD is a very kicking-oriented martial art.)



Kicks are like punches in that you can train to enhance their effectiveness. Kicks are initially slow and punches are initially weak, it's the training and conditioning that make them effective. Kicking is just less intuitive than punching. Sort of like trying to punch with your non-dominant hand. Kicks will always be slower than punches if you've trained your arms and legs equally, but the power is what makes them worth using sometimes. Assuming your opponent knows what he's doing, it's a bad idea to throw out high kicks, but the legs are still weapons that are effective against the lower body.


Punches are really only effective when aimed at the head, it takes too many to do damage to the torso assuming your opponent knows how to take a punch. Kicks can also be very effective to the upper body as well. In TKD, you train your kicking techniques with the aim of striking the stomach/chest of your opponent. Either way, if you train both your punches and kicks well, an untrained opponent will be unable to react in time to evade or block either; but punches will only bruise them (concuss if delived well to the head) while well-placed kicks will break bone (knock out cold if delivered to the head). Against a trained opponent, punches are effective only in close proximity while kicks have both more power and range. Kicks can also be aimed to the side and rear, while punches can only be aimed in front of you.
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Posted 11/9/15

Sir_jamesalot wrote:

I curl up in the fetal position like this badass.

Been doing it for nearly 30 years.



-think like Juza the Cloud- Ah Ha, all I have to do is pour some water on you! And I win!!
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Posted 11/9/15 , edited 11/9/15
Martial Arts taken: Pentjak Silat

Teacher: Guru Hans Knust Graichen

Age started: 27

Took classes 3 times a week for 4 years then moved out of state. Since in the USA there are only 6 teachers of the style I trained in, haven't been able to follow up. The style was passed down from Guru Rudy Ter Linden to Guru Andre Knust Graichen who is Guru Hans's brother.

Have been to workshops with Guru Willem de Thoures and Guru Victor de Thoures.

Pros:
The version of Silat I was taught has never been "sporterized" for tournaments. It is strictly self defense and most of the people in my class were law enforcement.

Cons:
Too many posers that will take your money pretending to be Gurus but who don't know their head from a hole in the ground. Very few REAL teachers in the USA. When I moved away there were only 6 instructors of the style I learned in the entire USA, most on the West Coast.

Web info: http://www.silat.tv/

Interesting info: Silat comes from Indonesia where there are literally hundreds of forms. The version I learned is good for fighting in tight spaces with limited room to move around. Silat starts off with weapons (sticks similar to escrima) and as you improve moves to empty handed fighting. The idea being that any idiot can pick up a weapon and use it, it takes more skill to fight without a weapon. Silat uses elbows and knees. My guru included shooting lessons with a former sniper as part of the class.
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