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Post Reply People get so mad at those who don't follow tradition
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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 11/8/15
So i'm Australia and here we have Anzac day to respect the fallen warriors who fought for us (who i do respect)

We have a minute or two of silence and i have offended people all my life because of my stance on it.

To me it's an illogical/emotional thing rather then a tradition of logic and because of that i personally don't agree with that tradition so i don't follow it.


Now to me it makes no sense to get pissed because someone doesn't agree / believe in the same tradition that you do and refuses to take part of it.

Been ridiculed for it all my life and personally i'm not changing my stance as i show my respect in other ways.

I think people are to sensetive.
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Posted 11/9/15

Ryulightorb wrote:

So i'm Australia and here we have Anzac day to respect the fallen warriors who fought for us (who i do respect)

We have a minute or two of silence and i have offended people all my life because of my stance on it.

To me it's an illogical/emotional thing rather then a tradition of logic and because of that i personally don't agree with that tradition so i don't follow it.


Now to me it makes no sense to get pissed because someone doesn't agree / believe in the same tradition that you do and refuses to take part of it.

Been ridiculed for it all my life and personally i'm not changing my stance as i show my respect in other ways.

I think people are to sensetive.


yes people are sensitive
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19 / M / "10/10" - IGN
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Posted 11/9/15 , edited 11/9/15
Of course emotion doesn't make sense, it's emotional. I'm usually in agreement that people should have freedom from other's beliefs and traditions, but as I've grown up I've realized that openly flaunting your grievances with everybody makes you an edgy person.

So, in light of that belief, I try to be polite and respect other's beliefs and traditions and to make them feel comfortable being themselves around me even if I personally dislike their beliefs. An example of this is swearing, I think that words you say into the air are harmless (they don't hurt anybody physically), but I refrain from swearing in public because it makes people uncomfortable usually.

There are many other examples I could give, but I think that the take away here is this: unless someone else's beliefs are unashamedly negative, oppressive, or are actively harming you, just smile and go along with it, or they won't like you.
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Posted 11/9/15
That was today?
I totally forgot to become completely useless for a minute.
But I very much doubt that what they would have wanted anyway.
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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 11/9/15

Sir_jamesalot wrote:

That was today?
I totally forgot to become completely useless for a minute.
But I very much doubt that what they would have wanted anyway.


Nah it wasn't today i was just happening to talk about it today.

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21 / Australia
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Posted 11/9/15 , edited 11/9/15
As long as you don't go to an ANZAC day event and talk during the minute of silence. The experience of being in a large crowd and no one talking is personally cool to me.

Also why are there two threads of the same question?
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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 11/9/15

GrandMasterTime wrote:

As long as you don't go to an ANZAC day event and talk during the minute of silence. The experience of being in a large crowd and no one talking is personally cool to me.

Also why are there two threads of the same question?


Just noticed....my internet tends to double post stuff O-o.

But i don't do that it's just annoying if its like at school or work..... people get offened if you even try to just move yourself out of the room.
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Posted 11/9/15

Ryulightorb wrote:


GrandMasterTime wrote:

As long as you don't go to an ANZAC day event and talk during the minute of silence. The experience of being in a large crowd and no one talking is personally cool to me.

Also why are there two threads of the same question?


Just noticed....my internet tends to double post stuff O-o.

But i don't do that it's just annoying if its like at school or work..... people get offened if you even try to just move yourself out of the room.


A situation like teachers trying to prevent you from leaving? I mean as long as you move out of the room in silence it should be fine right?
Posted 11/9/15 , edited 11/9/15




My favorite.
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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 11/9/15

GrandMasterTime wrote:


Ryulightorb wrote:


GrandMasterTime wrote:

As long as you don't go to an ANZAC day event and talk during the minute of silence. The experience of being in a large crowd and no one talking is personally cool to me.

Also why are there two threads of the same question?


Just noticed....my internet tends to double post stuff O-o.

But i don't do that it's just annoying if its like at school or work..... people get offened if you even try to just move yourself out of the room.


A situation like teachers trying to prevent you from leaving? I mean as long as you move out of the room in silence it should be fine right?


Sadly my teachers did not see it that way when i was in school.
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Posted 11/9/15 , edited 11/9/15
*Cynical View Here*

As you get older, I think you'll find it makes more sense to pick your battles and go with the flow when there is really no harm at all. I don't know Australian traditions, but a moment of silence for 2 minutes is one of the easiest things you can let society have. Nobody is policing your brain and you're not reciting anything that is against your morals.

Are such displays arguably meaningless? Undoubtedly you can argue that. Moments of silence are probably the "cheapest" display of recognition of anything. But if you save your protests for issues that matter, people will take you more seriously. To some people, that moment of silence is important whether you agree or not. So to actively thwart it is disrespecting those people, much like using some kind of derogatory term they don't like. Just grinding on people for no good reason is unproductive.

Should people be more chill? Yes. Given that they are not, is there value in rocking the boat for tiny, tiny things that you agree with the principle of anyway, if not the specific action?

EDIT: To answer the question in the thread title, it is mostly an issue of identity. Most traditions in a group are used to differentiate that group from outsiders, going back to tribal thinking. People identify themselves with groups in lots of ways, religion, politics, language, tattoos -- anything. Tradition is part of the "fabric" of a society.

Illogical as it is, people are extremely in tune to any perceived threats to their identity. "Us against Them," "If you're not with us, you're against us" is ingrained in our brains, and is something reasonable people have to work against being influenced by. Examine any subject where you find people are getting upset at you and I think based on your threads, it comes largely around your appearing to question their identity. It is illogical, yes. But it's part of our social instincts.
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Posted 11/9/15
I'm sure what you had to say certainly merits the attention of your intended audience . Congratulations, fool
The fact that you more than once brought up this useless insight speaks volume.
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40 / M / USA
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Posted 11/9/15
Screw traditions. I do what I want.
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23 / M / AZ
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Posted 11/9/15
When my uncle died my mother refused to go into mourning and continued on living.
It probably caused people to talk smack but I respect her for it.
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23 / M / erhhhh
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Posted 11/9/15
Do you think Christmas isn't worth celebrating either? If you constantly worry about being logical you'll just miss out on being a fun person who enjoys life, and whom people enjoy being around.
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