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Post Reply T-Mobile Binge On
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45 / Seattle
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Posted 2/2/16

Tidbits808 wrote:
ANYONE can use it and it's free. If a provider doesn't want to jump on it it then it's own them. Net Neutrality was on the basis have to BUY in, and give competitive advantage towards those buying in. Since it isn't buy in and no technical needs out of pocket T-Mobile isn't violating it.

In a matter of law, I wonder who is more likely to be an expert: A random Internet person, or a professor of law at Stanford and the director of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. This could be a tough one.


Barbara van Schewick:
T-Mobile says that it does not intend to become a gatekeeper on the Internet: It says Binge On is open to all legal video streaming providers at no cost, as long as they can meet some “simple technical requirements.” The idea is that any discriminatory effects of Binge On disappear as more providers join the program. However, the technical requirements published on T-Mobile’s website are substantial. They categorically exclude providers that use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), making it impossible for innovative providers such as YouTube to join. They discriminate against providers that use encryption, a practice that is becoming the industry standard. While some providers can join easily, a significant number will need to work with T-Mobile to determine whether their service can be part of Binge On. Many will have to invest time and resources to adapt their service to T-Mobile’s systems. The smaller the provider, the longer it will likely take for T-Mobile to get to it.

The result: Binge On allows some providers to join easily and creates lasting barriers for others, especially small players, non-commercial providers, and start-ups. As such, the program harms competition, user choice, free expression, and innovation... [snip]

Fourth, Binge On harms innovation. The Internet was built on a central principle: As long as innovators respect fundamental Internet standards, they can reach people all over the world at low costs. Binge On changes that. It requires video providers to work with T-Mobile to join Binge On and, in many cases, to change their service to meet the ISP’s technical requirements.

The above concerns are not hypothetical. Music Freedom, T-Mobile’s zero-rating program for music streaming, has created similar harms that continue today. T-Mobile has said that Music Freedom is open to all music streaming services since it launched the program in 2014. Although the program has grown from 7 to 40 providers, it still includes only a fraction of the more than 2,000 licensed online radio streaming services in the US. Some smaller services had to wait 1½ years to be included; some never heard back from T-Mobile at all.

~~~~~


Tidbits808:
Also customers can opt in or opt out on their own. T-Mobile isn't stopping any provider from jumping on.

In theory, sure... if you ignore their history of doing the opposite, and the details of their requirements. See above.

~~~~~


Tidbits808:
Also as for them "throttling" all video. When you opt in, and people have little to no reading comprehension it even says it will force 480 streaming if you opt in to make data last 3 times longer for those who are not on unlimited data plans.

It's a good thing, and people are fear mongering about it.


Yeah. Everyone knows the Electronic Frontier Foundation are just a bunch of loud-mouthed profiteers, and the T-Mobile CEO leads a well-respected organization known as the premier defender of the little guy against corporate control of the Internet.


PC Mag:
EFF recently published a report that says T-Mobile throttles all HTML5 video streams to around 1.5Mps, even when a phone is capable of downloading at higher speeds. The study also says T-Mobile's video "optimization" does not alter or enhance the mobile stream, as advertised.

Legere hit back at the Foundation with what he called "color commentary," asking "Who the f**k are you, anyway, EFF?" and contending that the nonprofit is using net neutrality as a jumping-off point to make headline news.
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Posted 2/2/16
Yes, I am some internet guy. Stanford Law schools has been just as much wrong as they are right. If they were such the creme of the crops why are not all the top lawyers from Stanford? Doesn't it make you wonder how good they really are?

T-Mobile still doesn't charge for the service. Remember net neutrality if about forcing costs to pay for bandwidth which no company is doing. T-Mobile isn't pulling if you want to stream Netflix you have to pay us $$$$$ then we won't throttle you... Show me where T-Mobile is doing that? IF you read the FAQ you will see the "throttle" does happen as intended. It detects video bandwidth and it forces the provider to stream no higher than 480P. It's not rocket science as soon as I read it I KNEW that's the only way they could do it was the slow bandwidth. EFF if they read it they would have seen it, but of course they had to spend donations to find that out. FYI I do donate yearly to EFF, and I like the amount of work they do. They are not always right, and don't always do good like everyone makes them out to be.

Like I said. T-Mobile doesn't charge to jump on the service. They told people signing on you will get no better than 480P video no matter where it is from. You can even opt out if you don't want to use it. To me right there doesn't violate NN by definition Stanford, EFF, and that camp wanted. If they meant differently then they better define it better, and the reason why FCC does per case basis to ensure it doesn't, and FCC still hasn't done a thing since Music freedom.
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Posted 2/17/16
I'm new on Tmobile and got the unlimited - with Binge on and it's awesome. Enjoying Hulu, Netflix, Pandora and Raphsody for hours and 0.0 data used. I was on AT&T and my data was over in a few days, in Tmobile I have for all month including using hotspot for the ps3 and online gaming. Sick. :)

It would be awesome to have Crunchyroll added to binge on.
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45 / Seattle
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Posted 2/20/16 , edited 2/20/16

Tidbits808 wrote:
Yes, I am some internet guy. Stanford Law schools has been just as much wrong as they are right. If they were such the creme of the crops why are not all the top lawyers from Stanford? Doesn't it make you wonder how good they really are?


Please tell me you didn't just seriously imply that by virtue of having an opinion and a mouth, your "I said so" has more weight with regard to Internet law than a detailed, point-by-point breakdown from a professor of law at Stanford and the director of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.


T-Mobile still doesn't charge for the service. Remember net neutrality if about forcing costs to pay for bandwidth which no company is doing. T-Mobile isn't pulling if you want to stream Netflix you have to pay us $$$$$ then we won't throttle you... Show me where T-Mobile is doing that?

Ah. I must have been mistaken. Here I thought that T-Mobile does charge quite a bit for data that comes from smaller websites, non-commercial websites, websites that use encryption, websites that can't afford to (or simply choose not to) comply with T-Mobile's arbitrary choices for streaming protocols, and websites that don't stream video at all.

"I'm going to set myself up as the arbitrary gatekeeper for who gets to send my users free data and whose data I'll charge for out the wazoo, with high barriers to entry." Silly me, why did I think that was a clear violation of net neutrality?


...ah, well. I was originally planning to reply to your insinuations that T-Mobile's FAQ is more trustworthy than EFF computer researchers, or that if the FCC (who tried to quietly do away with net neutrality altogether, until most of the US said "uh - NO") doesn't mind blatant de facto violations on a "case by case" basis then everything is peaches and cream - but then I realized I could be doing something more productive. If anyone needs me, I'll be over here trying to convince an ice cube to spontaneously combust.

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Posted 5/20/16
Tmobiles binge on now has Crunchyroll
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29 / M / Kentucky
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Posted 7/18/16
I'll stick with my AT&T + DirecTV unlimited package data deal. 4g speeds that is good for a minimum of 22GB of data a month per line and little worries of throttling past that since i dont live in a congested area that eats up a ton of bandwidth and best part no matter what site or streaming service I use it all runs at full speed.
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