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Post Reply What does the perfect Knifu look like?
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14 / M
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Posted 11/24/15 , edited 11/25/15
Reported.

I have aichmophobia.
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27 / M
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Posted 11/25/15
A katana is surprisingly difficult to use. I like spring steel monotempered ones since they are forgiving of botched cuts and still hold an acceptable edge. It's easier to use a one-handed blade unless you're so strong you can easily wield a kat with one hand.

Katana maintenance can also be laborious. I do the wrappings and stuff myself but they take time to learn. You need to oil the sword as well as take care of the saya. It's probably more practical to get a machete.
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34 / M / Off the map.
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Posted 11/25/15 , edited 11/25/15
It must be sharp.


Well Balanced for throwing.


And attached to a cute teenage girl who's not afraid to use it.
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 11/25/15

Morbidhanson wrote:

A katana is surprisingly difficult to use. I like spring steel monotempered ones since they are forgiving of botched cuts and still hold an acceptable edge. It's easier to use a one-handed blade unless you're so strong you can easily wield a kat with one hand.

Katana maintenance can also be laborious. I do the wrappings and stuff myself but they take time to learn. You need to oil the sword as well as take care of the saya. It's probably more practical to get a machete.


It's not a question of strength, no matter how strong you are the fact a Katana's handle is far too long to be used comfortably and effectively in one handed grip is the problem. Unless you modify the handle to be much shorter it would only get in your way if you tried to use it one handed. And even so a two hand grip is more practical because it allows one to impart far more kinetic power into a strike, making it more likely to overwhelm the opponent guard . Though that is a rather moot point, not a whole lot of sword vs sword fighting going on these days in the streets. Long blades have had their day, hell even knives are barely useful in this day and age.
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M / HI
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Posted 11/25/15
The Perfect knife is one that can cut lol
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Posted 11/25/15 , edited 11/25/15

Ranwolf wrote:

It's not a question of strength, no matter how strong you are the fact a Katana's handle is far too long to be used comfortably and effectively in one handed grip is the problem. Unless you modify the handle to be much shorter it would only get in your way if you tried to use it one handed. And even so a two hand grip is more practical because it allows one to impart far more kinetic power into a strike, making it more likely to overwhelm the opponent guard . Though that is a rather moot point, not a whole lot of sword vs sword fighting going on these days in the streets. Long blades have had their day, hell even knives are barely useful in this day and age.


The handle provides essential balance and allows you to guide the swings. The weight of the blade does most of the work in the cutting process. There's no need for a short katana handle for a one-handed style since the issue is the long blade. It is a matter of strength if you're using a daito in one hand. If there was a short handle, you end up with a very nose-heavy weapon. And you need even more strength to wield something like that. A wakizashi is easier to use with one hand, although some do have handles long enough for two. You can simply grip lower if the handle is the issue.

People tend to swing more slowly with two hands if they aren't used to the motion, attempting to muscle the swings. Letting the weight do the work feels more natural with one hand. That's why it's usually better to use one-handed if you don't have much training.
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18 / M / Denmark Boy
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Posted 11/25/15 , edited 11/25/15
I:::::::I=====>
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 11/25/15

Morbidhanson wrote:



The handle provides essential balance and allows you to guide the swings. The weight of the blade does most of the work in the cutting process. There's no need for a short katana handle for a one-handed style since the issue is the long blade. It is a matter of strength if you're using a daito in one hand. If there was a short handle, you end up with a very nose-heavy weapon. And you need even more strength to wield something like that. A wakizashi is easier to use with one hand, although some do have handles long enough for two. You can simply grip lower if the handle is the issue.

People tend to swing more slowly with two hands if they aren't used to the motion, attempting to muscle the swings. Letting the weight do the work feels more natural with one hand. That's why it's usually better to use one-handed if you don't have much training.



Using a Katana or hell any curved blade with one hand defeats their main strengths. And that is in the draw and push cuts, it is impossible to preform a push or draw cut properly with a one handed grip. As you simply lack the control and power to do it with only one hand on the sword. Not to mention a Katana was originally designed and balanced for a two handed grip, hence the length of the handle and the point of balance on it. If you're looking for a one handed blade the straight swords of Europe are probably your better option. They tend to make better choppers, which is suited to a one handed grip. Though either way a Differential tempered blade is probably a better choice then mono-tempered as it is less maintenance required.
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22 / M / The Cosmos
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Posted 11/25/15
Simple, serrated, and spring assisted
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Posted 11/25/15

IShouldBeStudying wrote:

Simple, serrated, and spring assisted



Serrated..really..get out you pleb ya know nothing about knives.
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39 / Inside your compu...
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Posted 11/25/15
knife with propellers
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Posted 11/25/15 , edited 11/25/15
There are styles that use a daito in one hand and the wakizashi in the other. It is possible to use the daito with one hand but you need strength to do so.

European straight swords were designed for more thrusting. A curved blade is always better for slashing and chopping.

Modern monotempered swords are more durable than diffentially hardened swords due to improved metallurgy. Differentially hardened blades can achieve a sharper/harder edge since the cutting surface can be hardened more than the jacket. However, differentially hardened blades don't have the forgiving sideways flex that monotempered swords can have. They won't bend back on a botched cut like a spring tempered monosteel will. For this reason, I think differentially tempered blades require more care in use. They are sometimes easier to sharpen, though, depending on the hardness and composition of the layered steels.

I sharpen swords and knives.
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 11/25/15

Morbidhanson wrote:

There are styles that use a daito in one hand and the wakizashi in the other. It is possible to use the daito with one hand but you need strength to do so.

European straight swords were designed for more thrusting. A curved blade is always better for slashing and chopping.

Modern monotempered swords are more durable than differentially hardened swords due to improved metallurgy. Differentially hardened blades can achieve a sharper/harder edge since the cutting surface can be hardened more than the jacket. However, differentially hardened blades don't have the forgiving sideways flex that monotempered swords can have. They won't bend back on a botched cut like a spring tempered monosteel will. For this reason, I think differentially tempered blades require more care in use. They are sometimes easier to sharpen, though, depending on the hardness and composition of the layered steels.

I sharpen swords and knives.


European swords are also designed for use with one hand, the broadsword,arming sword, and rapier variants chief among them in terms of one handed use. Their balance, handle length, and edge or point geometry meant to aid their one handed use.

As for differentially tempered blades versus mono-tempered ones. Yes a differentially tempered blade will have less flex to it then a mono-tempered one but this is actually a good thing in the thrust and the slice as less kinetic energy is wasted in the flex. Does it make it more prone to breakage or chipping, again yes but to anyone with a modicum of skill this will not be an issue. And even a mono tempered blade can break under heavy usage. And not only is a differentially tempered blade easier to sharpen it retains that sharp edge under far more punishment then a mono tempered blade will.

In the end the only advantage a mono tempered blade has is it is a beginners blade as it were. It sacrifices too much performance for so called reliability for anyone with a modicum of skill to consider.
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Posted 11/25/15 , edited 11/25/15

Ranwolf wrote:

European swords are also designed for use with one hand, the broadsword,arming sword, and rapier variants chief among them in terms of one handed use. Their balance, handle length, and edge or point geometry meant to aid their one handed use.

As for differentially tempered blades versus mono-tempered ones. Yes a differentially tempered blade will have less flex to it then a mono-tempered one but this is actually a good thing in the thrust and the slice as less kinetic energy is wasted in the flex. Does it make it more prone to breakage or chipping, again yes but to anyone with a modicum of skill this will not be an issue. And even a mono tempered blade can break under heavy usage. And not only is a differentially tempered blade easier to sharpen it retains that sharp edge under far more punishment then a mono tempered blade will.

In the end the only advantage a mono tempered blade has is it is a beginners blade as it were. It sacrifices too much performance for so called reliability for anyone with a modicum of skill to consider.


One-handed use but their blades were more thrust-centric.

The difference in edge HRC when comparing monotempered and differentially hardened blades is usually less than 5. It's pretty insignificant and not noticeable in actual use. The blade doesn't flex that much more easily and it's not enough to make a difference when you strike a person. It is that a differentially hardened blade will stay flexed if it is bent too much and a harder edge chips more easily. It's more of a maintenance issue. The reason differentially tempered blades are so much pricier is because of the labor that goes into them and the demand for beautiful genuine hamon. Even the most skilled people make occasional mistakes and spring-tempered monosteels are TOUGH. All-in-all, it's safer and cheaper to cut with a well-treated monotemper.
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Posted 11/25/15

Morbidhanson wrote:


One-handed use but their blades were more thrust-centric.

The difference in edge HRC when comparing mono-tempered and differentially hardened blades is usually less than 5. It's pretty insignificant and not noticeable in actual use. The blade doesn't flex that much more easily and it's not enough to make a difference when you strike a person. It is that a differentially hardened blade will stay flexed if it is bent too much and a harder edge chips more easily. It's more of a maintenance issue. The reason differentially tempered blades are so much pricier is because of the labour that goes into them and the demand for beautiful genuine hamon. Even the most skilled people make occasional mistakes and spring-tempered monosteels are TOUGH. All-in-all, it's safer and cheaper to cut with a well-treated mono-temper.


This is because a ) They were dealing with heavily armoured opponents, something no Katana wielding Samurai ever had to do and b ) It is far easier to kill a man if you put a foot of steel into him then if you cut him. Organ shut down and massive blood loss is always the result of having a sword shoved into your middle. This doesn't always happen with the draw cut that the Katana is best at.

As for the slight advantage gained by differentially tempered blades not being worth the effort and possible safety risk. In a battle of equals the slightest edge over your opponent is the surest path to victory. That saying has held true since the dawn of warfare and will hold true until the end of time. Mono-tempered steel is cheaper and arguably tough but weapons break no matter what and I'd rather risk my skill and the better preforming steel against chance then settle for second best simply because it likely has less chance of breaking on me. And honestly I much prefer the thought somebody went through the time and effort to forge me something that is one of a kind then trust the tolerances of a machine made blade. After all the robots can't even get engines right, why should I trust them with my life as it were.
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