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Posted 11/23/15
I'm clicking on "cancel free trial" but nothing is happening.
Can customer support please turn Auto Renewal off
One Punch Mod
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Posted 11/24/15

abcjuan23 wrote:

I'm clicking on "cancel free trial" but nothing is happening.
Can customer support please turn Auto Renewal off


Is nothing happening, or are you getting the message that says payment method is being verified and to try later?

Once payment method is verified you should be able to cancel, but note that because it's a trial, it will end immediately when you cancel.
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Posted 11/24/15
At first, nothing was happening. Now it says they are validating my billing address, so I'm unable to cancel the trial. Do you have any idea how long that usually takes?
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Posted 11/24/15

abcjuan23 wrote:

At first, nothing was happening. Now it says they are validating my billing address, so I'm unable to cancel the trial. Do you have any idea how long that usually takes?


24-48 hours from when you first sign up.
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45 / Seattle
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Posted 11/25/15

abcjuan23 wrote:

At first, nothing was happening. Now it says they are validating my billing address, so I'm unable to cancel the trial. Do you have any idea how long that usually takes?


I hadn't really stopped to think about it before, but now that I have, I don't understand... why does someone have to wait until their payment information or billing address is verified to cancel a free trial?

I would completely understand if it were a situation where someone has asked for a refund but the company hasn't gotten the merchandise back yet (or any similar situation where the company has to take the customer's word for it that they don't still owe money), and I sorta understand if it were a situation where the company wants to get payment before they'll let you stop a recurring charge from continuing to add up. But to keep someone from cancelling for the first few days after a free trial starts? Really?

I thought the whole idea (at least in theory) is that it's "free trial". "Free trial", as in "you won't owe us anything unless you continue". If someone clicks on a button a few hours after the trial starts, to try to indicate "No, I don't want to continue", why does the company have any standing to say "Okay, but you have to wait a few days first"?

At least in theory, the trial subscriber doesn't owe the company money (and will not in the future, because they're asserting they don't want to "buy" a continuance). So why does the company still have the right to act as if they do owe them money (or might in the future)?

It might be an excuse to keep someone from cancelling because the company hopes the trial subscriber will change their mind. A bit sleazy, but understandable.

But to be honest, it sounds more like the company hopes some people will forget to cancel if they're not allowed to cancel immediately.
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Posted 11/25/15

arimareiji wrote:


abcjuan23 wrote:

At first, nothing was happening. Now it says they are validating my billing address, so I'm unable to cancel the trial. Do you have any idea how long that usually takes?


I hadn't really stopped to think about it before, but now that I have, I don't understand... why does someone have to wait until their payment information or billing address is verified to cancel a free trial?

I would completely understand if it were a situation where someone has asked for a refund but the company hasn't gotten the merchandise back yet (or any similar situation where the company has to take the customer's word for it that they don't still owe money), and I sorta understand if it were a situation where the company wants to get payment before they'll let you stop a recurring charge from continuing to add up. But to keep someone from cancelling for the first few days after a free trial starts? Really?

I thought the whole idea (at least in theory) is that it's "free trial". "Free trial", as in "you won't owe us anything unless you continue". If someone clicks on a button a few hours after the trial starts, to try to indicate "No, I don't want to continue", why does the company have any standing to say "Okay, but you have to wait a few days first"?

At least in theory, the trial subscriber doesn't owe the company money (and will not in the future, because they're asserting they don't want to "buy" a continuance). So why does the company still have the right to act as if they do owe them money (or might in the future)?

It might be an excuse to keep someone from cancelling because the company hopes the trial subscriber will change their mind. A bit sleazy, but understandable.

But to be honest, it sounds more like the company hopes some people will forget to cancel if they're not allowed to cancel immediately.


Based on an explanation I'd seen in the past (can't recall if it was from shinryou, Bjaker, or someone else), it's done in order to prevent credit card scammers from using CR to validate the authenticity of CC information, then quickly cancel the charges before any pre-auth hits the bank statement (not sure on that part?), and tipping off the owner to attempted fraud.

Beyond that, it does seem like an arbitrarily long window, but it may be a requirement for CR to operate in certain countries with different rules than those covered by PCI.
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45 / Seattle
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Posted 11/25/15

eyeofpain wrote:


arimareiji wrote:


Based on an explanation I'd seen in the past (can't recall if it was from shinryou, Bjaker, or someone else), it's done in order to prevent credit card scammers from using CR to validate the authenticity of CC information, then quickly cancel the charges before any pre-auth hits the bank statement (not sure on that part?), and tipping off the owner to attempted fraud.

Beyond that, it does seem like an arbitrarily long window, but it may be a requirement for CR to operate in certain countries with different rules than those covered by PCI.


I'd be very interested in knowing if it's policy or law.

If it's law, it doesn't make sense and I'd be curious in knowing what country and what law requires it.

If it's policy, a simple illustration might help. With regard to requiring it for the free trial in the first place, it's dubious - who here would go to a physical store that requires you to give them your credit card at the door "just in case" you buy something? That aside, who would go to a store that doesn't warn you in advance that if you try to leave in less than an hour they won't give you your card back, and you'll have to come back and get it?

The Wise Wizard
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Posted 11/26/15

arimareiji wrote:

With regard to requiring it for the free trial in the first place, it's dubious - who here would go to a physical store that requires you to give them your credit card at the door "just in case" you buy something?

Most services that operate on a subscription basis and offer a free trial require payment information up front.

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45 / Seattle
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Posted 11/26/15

TheAncientOne wrote:


arimareiji wrote:

With regard to requiring it for the free trial in the first place, it's dubious - who here would go to a physical store that requires you to give them your credit card at the door "just in case" you buy something?

Most services that operate on a subscription basis and offer a free trial require payment information up front.


Thank you for the response, but the core of my illustration wasn't that it's illegal or even wrong per se to require payment information up front. I don't especially buy "Everyone does it" as a true justification, but I'll concede that "It's a good way to keep someone from repeatedly getting free trials" would mostly justify it*. I just find it dubious.

The core of my illustration was "That aside, who would go to a store that doesn't warn you in advance that if you try to leave in less than an hour they won't give you your card back, and you'll have to come back and get it?"

Or, to restate the original point this was meant to illustrate: Why would any company think it's logical or fair** to keep you from immediately cancelling a "free" trial, at a time when you owe them no money and you're trying to tell them you do not want to subscribe... because they want to make sure they can charge you for it first?


* - I'm not sure whether CR employs this, though, since IIRC the response to one complaint was that they had been getting multiple free trials and got charged because they forgot to cancel one of them in time. For the record, I'm not asking for that information (and wouldn't even want CR to imperil their ability to avoid this by answering), I'm just saying they may not... though it would be really weird if they don't.

** - Even moreso if if they're not warning you in advance that you won't be allowed to cancel immediately.
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Posted 14 days ago , edited 14 days ago
I actually set some reminders on my phone to remind me to cancel it so I won't get charged lmao
Der Zoodirektor
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Posted 14 days ago

phantrashnumber1 wrote:

I actually set some reminders on my phone to remind me to cancel it so I won't get charged lmao


Please send a ticket to /contact regarding your cancellation issue.
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