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Posted 12/3/15

potentsativa wrote:

Not too fond of the translations that we idolize today, that were translated into english by white christian missionaries with a completely different mindset/ world view and carries it's own bias probably quite a bit removed from what the intended message originally was, not to mention that through translations things get lost. Nor am I too fond of the way people take these ideas too literally.

Like the first of the Nobel Truths "Life is Dukkha" Dukkha can be translated into suffering or it can be translated into Discord or frustration. Each word giving a different perspective.

I would argue that these "truths" aren't truths but a way into realizing the nature of ourselves, since actualizing some of the "truths" is impossible and you can either accept that or continue on a path of thinking that if you just try harder you'll achieve this pinnacle of existence .

The second Nobel Truth is that sufferings origin is "Trinisha" its where we get our word thirst from or can be translated into desire couple this with the third Nobel Truth which is that you can achieve happiness through giving up desire. So in your journey eventually you'll realize that you desire to give up desire is just another form of desire. A fruitless endeavor.



Not all, just like one can decide they want to eat healthy and give up junk food or give up smoking, through meditation and mindfulness it is completely possibly to give up desire. If you understand that things are always subject to change and that there is always impermanence, the suffering that comes from attachment can be greatly diminished and even eliminated completely.
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Posted 12/3/15 , edited 12/3/15
Nope. I don't have time to practice any kind of religion and religious rituals.
Posted 12/3/15

Irishsushi wrote:


potentsativa wrote:

Not too fond of the translations that we idolize today, that were translated into english by white christian missionaries with a completely different mindset/ world view and carries it's own bias probably quite a bit removed from what the intended message originally was, not to mention that through translations things get lost. Nor am I too fond of the way people take these ideas too literally.

Like the first of the Nobel Truths "Life is Dukkha" Dukkha can be translated into suffering or it can be translated into Discord or frustration. Each word giving a different perspective.

I would argue that these "truths" aren't truths but a way into realizing the nature of ourselves, since actualizing some of the "truths" is impossible and you can either accept that or continue on a path of thinking that if you just try harder you'll achieve this pinnacle of existence .

The second Nobel Truth is that sufferings origin is "Trinisha" its where we get our word thirst from or can be translated into desire couple this with the third Nobel Truth which is that you can achieve happiness through giving up desire. So in your journey eventually you'll realize that you desire to give up desire is just another form of desire. A fruitless endeavor.



Not all, just like one can decide they want to eat healthy and give up junk food or give up smoking, through meditation and mindfulness it is completely possibly to give up desire. If you understand that things are always subject to change and that there is always impermanence, the suffering that comes from attachment can be greatly diminished and even eliminated completely.


Giving up junk food and smoking sound like desires to me, but there not intrinsically bad as well as a lot of other desires. Why is suffering bad or undesirable? Does Suffering have no benefits? Do we not learn through our suffering? The desire to stop suffering through somehow attaining a place of no desire is paradoxical and has no point, which is the point. the whole teaching is paradoxical, the idea of impermanence in of itself contradicts itself.
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Posted 12/3/15 , edited 12/3/15


Yes, it's a huge paradox; is your desire to be free from all desires? Would freeing yourself from desire be considered fulfilling a desire? Do you desire to remain free from desire, if that state is ever achieved? It's quite mysterious.

I've learned a lot from suffering, maybe we are never truly free from it, but we learn to cope with it, and from that understanding, flow all the good things in life. And that's just one way of looking at, it seems quite complex in it's simplicity. And what about 'good suffering'; do you not feel pleasure and pain at the same time during a massage? Or when you watch a horror film, aren't you suffering and ejoying it, and not necessarily from a purely physical response? You really can go on and on and...

Edit: Irishsushi I love your new avatar, and I think it fits with some of the points that are being discussed in this topic.
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Posted 12/3/15

potentsativa wrote:


Irishsushi wrote:


potentsativa wrote:

Not too fond of the translations that we idolize today, that were translated into english by white christian missionaries with a completely different mindset/ world view and carries it's own bias probably quite a bit removed from what the intended message originally was, not to mention that through translations things get lost. Nor am I too fond of the way people take these ideas too literally.

Like the first of the Nobel Truths "Life is Dukkha" Dukkha can be translated into suffering or it can be translated into Discord or frustration. Each word giving a different perspective.

I would argue that these "truths" aren't truths but a way into realizing the nature of ourselves, since actualizing some of the "truths" is impossible and you can either accept that or continue on a path of thinking that if you just try harder you'll achieve this pinnacle of existence .

The second Nobel Truth is that sufferings origin is "Trinisha" its where we get our word thirst from or can be translated into desire couple this with the third Nobel Truth which is that you can achieve happiness through giving up desire. So in your journey eventually you'll realize that you desire to give up desire is just another form of desire. A fruitless endeavor.



Not all, just like one can decide they want to eat healthy and give up junk food or give up smoking, through meditation and mindfulness it is completely possibly to give up desire. If you understand that things are always subject to change and that there is always impermanence, the suffering that comes from attachment can be greatly diminished and even eliminated completely.


Giving up junk food and smoking sound like desires to me, but there not intrinsically bad as well as a lot of other desires. Why is suffering bad or undesirable? Does Suffering have no benefits? Do we not learn through our suffering? The desire to stop suffering through somehow attaining a place of no desire is paradoxical and has no point, which is the point. the whole teaching is paradoxical, the idea of impermanence in of itself contradicts itself.


Hmm it seems to me you are not very familiar with Buddhist teachings. While they are not intrinsically bad the problem is that desire leads to addiction whether it be addiction to food or clothes or a drug and that is what creates suffering. Yes we can learn from suffering what we learn is how we can prevent suffering and who our minds and bodies work. How is impermanence paradoxical? All things are subject to change nothing stays the same, that is what the meaning of impermanence is. There isn't a "desire" to be free from suffering, once you understand what suffering is and what arises within ourselves that makes us suffer you are able to remove it from your life. Here is a link to a teacher on youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQJ6ESCWQotBwtJm0Ff_gyQ keep in mind he is very thoughtful in his speech so he kind of talks slow but I find that he is very informational.
Posted 12/3/15

shinblade wrote:



Yes, it's a huge paradox; is your desire to be free from all desires? Would freeing yourself from desire be considered fulfilling a desire? Do you desire to remain free from desire, if that state is ever achieved? It's quite mysterious.

I've learned a lot from suffering, maybe we are never truly free from it, but we learn to cope with it, and from that understanding, flow all the good things in life. And that's just one way of looking at, it seems quite complex in it's simplicity. And what about 'good suffering'; do you not feel pleasure and pain at the same time during a massage? Or when you watch a horror film, aren't you suffering and ejoying it, and not necessarily from a purely physical response? You really can go on and on and...


Indeed. A couple things I would like to note is: (Applies to all religions and philosophies)

1. Perhaps the teachings or a lot of eastern philosophies act like jokes, in that the point of the joke is not the joke but the spontaneous laughter that you have inside of yourself

2. Perhaps teachings are written down or put out to prove that they can't be done or accomplished

3.Perhaps you should keep in mind the cultural context like who said it, why did they say it, why did that make sense, why did that make sense then?

4. Who translated it? And understanding that translating everything accurately is frankly impossible.

5. These teachings are coming through humans who have biases, limitations, preferences, likes and dislikes.
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Posted 12/3/15
I'm not buddhist as such. My religion is a combination of all religions. I believe that I've reached enlightenment by understanding what questions the buddha was asking and understanding the answer he got. This is only opinion though. I do meditate from time to time as well.
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Posted 12/3/15

potentsativa wrote:

Indeed. A couple things I would like to note is: (Applies to all religions and philosophies)

1. Perhaps the teachings or a lot of eastern philosophies act like jokes, in that the point of the joke is not the joke but the spontaneous laughter that you have inside of yourself

2. Perhaps teachings are written down or put out to prove that they can't be done or accomplished

3.Perhaps you should keep in mind the cultural context like who said it, why did they say it, why did that make sense, why did that make sense then?

4. Who translated it? And understanding that translating everything accurately is frankly impossible.

5. These teachings are coming through humans who have biases, limitations, preferences, likes and dislikes.


Those are really good points; I like the first one a lot.

Posted 12/3/15

Irishsushi wrote:

Hmm it seems to me you are not very familiar with Buddhist teachings. While they are not intrinsically bad the problem is that desire leads to addiction whether it be addiction to food or clothes or a drug and that is what creates suffering. Yes we can learn from suffering what we learn is how we can prevent suffering and who our minds and bodies work. How is impermanence paradoxical? All things are subject to change nothing stays the same, that is what the meaning of impermanence is. There isn't a "desire" to be free from suffering, once you understand what suffering is and what arises within ourselves that makes us suffer you are able to remove it from your life. Here is a link to a teacher on youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQJ6ESCWQotBwtJm0Ff_gyQ keep in mind he is very thoughtful in his speech so he kind of talks slow but I find that he is very informational.


Oh I'm familiar its just a matter of interpretation.
Posted 12/3/15
No. I have never actually met a Buddhist
Posted 12/3/15

shinblade wrote:

Those are really good points; I like the first one a lot.



Thanks, that's why I like zen stories.
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Posted 12/3/15
Nopeee (:
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Posted 12/3/15
they have some huge statues
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Posted 12/3/15
I am a Buddhist. But I would say I'm a Buddhist on my own terms I agree and disagree with things involving Buddhism but I try to follow most of its teaching because it does truly help me feel better. I take the teachings of Buddhism and make them my own idk lol maybe I'm just weird.
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Posted 12/3/15

henikmattlog wrote:

I am a Buddhist. But I would say I'm a Buddhist on my own terms I agree and disagree with things involving Buddhism but I try to follow most of its teaching because it does truly help me feel better. I take the teachings of Buddhism and make them my own idk lol maybe I'm just weird.


That sounds perfectly reasonable to me.

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