First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply Is it honestly worth going to college?
98 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 12/5/15
I've been wondering if I should continue going to college. Right now I'm in a community college, was planning to transfer to a university after I've done my two years. I was going for Computer Science... but in all honesty, fuck that. Really found out after my first semester, I hate math. It's not a matter of it's difficult and I cannot understand it, I can learn it relatively quickly. I just hate doing it. I've been looking into computer programming instead, since it seems not so math intensive, just a good grip on algebra and Boolean logic. I honestly would like something to do with psychology, like a Psychiatrist, but also wanted something that has a good chance of me getting a job and support myself but wouldn't completely hate to do. So I'm asking now that my first semester has just ended... what should I do? Also, I hate to use the word, but i guess I'm poor, so money is a huge factor and i do not want to be in an ocean of debt. BTW, I dont like to say I'm poor because I look at myself above others, but because I know people who are worst off and feel like I have no right to say I'm poor, but relatively in the US, I'm right below the poverty line and getting a job has been difficult, even for a fast food place. Waiting for KFC to call up dammit... and still applying to other places, but I can tell not having prior work experience really holds me back. So... yeah, I dont know what to do and I'm questioning if I should just stop going to college.
2047 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / USA
Offline
Posted 12/5/15
If you look at the bureau of labor statistics website you will see that having any degree will drastically increase your earnings over the course of your life. Also you could look at trade school and be a welder or something like that they make good money but its hard labor make no mistake about it. If you ever want to do more than fast food or retail you are gonna need to get additional schooling.
9021 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / New England
Offline
Posted 12/5/15
Honestly to me, it isn't. I did wait until I turned 24 so I could apply independant, for help from the government to pay for classes. By by the time you finish most degrees, there's not even jobs out there though. I waited because I have very low income and I couldn't afford it at the time. I am finishing up one degree soon now that I'm getting a bit of help. The courses are a good way to better yourself mentally so sometimes it is a plus.
When it comes down to it, you just need to see what you want to do in YOUR life and if college is going to help YOU get there.
(Please note that these are just my personal feelings on these subjects.)
28602 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
51 / M / Inside the Anime...
Offline
Posted 12/5/15

dub2191 wrote:

I've been wondering if I should continue going to college. Right now I'm in a community college, was planning to transfer to a university after I've done my two years. I was going for Computer Science... but in all honesty, fuck that. Really found out after my first semester, I hate math. It's not a matter of it's difficult and I cannot understand it, I can learn it relatively quickly. I just hate doing it. I've been looking into computer programming instead, since it seems not so math intensive, just a good grip on algebra and Boolean logic. I honestly would like something to do with psychology, like a Psychiatrist, but also wanted something that has a good chance of me getting a job and support myself but wouldn't completely hate to do. So I'm asking now that my first semester has just ended... what should I do? Also, I hate to use the word, but i guess I'm poor, so money is a huge factor and i do not want to be in an ocean of debt. BTW, I dont like to say I'm poor because I look at myself above others, but because I know people who are worst off and feel like I have no right to say I'm poor, but relatively in the US, I'm right below the poverty line and getting a job has been difficult, even for a fast food place. Waiting for KFC to call up dammit... and still applying to other places, but I can tell not having prior work experience really holds me back. So... yeah, I dont know what to do and I'm questioning if I should just stop going to college.


Yeah me too, hated the stuff. Then i realized it was a tool just like using a spreadsheet or a pencil. Then I realized that anything I wanted to do that would be worth my time was going to take math. The more badass the career; the more math it would take. So I gritted my teeth and ate the poison pill (multi-variable differential analysis, by the way it tasted terrible). I'm glad I did. There's no way I would have what I have if it wasn't for math. I'm so glad that I didn't shut that door when I was still young. Now math is a tool I use once in a while to get the more complex material down. Otherwise it's just something I know how to do. Besides math classes don't last forever. I can't even remember what my math teachers even looked like. By the way here's something my dad said, "Son it's not yard work that's your problem, the yard works problem is you!" I realized that if I stopped hating yard work, yard work becomes easier. Dad was pretty amazing. I don't love math, nor hate it, it's just something I do when necessary. Ganbatte!
9127 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M
Online
Posted 12/5/15

dub2191 wrote:

I've been wondering if I should continue going to college. Right now I'm in a community college, was planning to transfer to a university after I've done my two years. I was going for Computer Science... but in all honesty, fuck that. Really found out after my first semester, I hate math. It's not a matter of it's difficult and I cannot understand it, I can learn it relatively quickly. I just hate doing it. I've been looking into computer programming instead, since it seems not so math intensive, just a good grip on algebra and Boolean logic. I honestly would like something to do with psychology, like a Psychiatrist, but also wanted something that has a good chance of me getting a job and support myself but wouldn't completely hate to do. So I'm asking now that my first semester has just ended... what should I do? Also, I hate to use the word, but i guess I'm poor, so money is a huge factor and i do not want to be in an ocean of debt. BTW, I dont like to say I'm poor because I look at myself above others, but because I know people who are worst off and feel like I have no right to say I'm poor, but relatively in the US, I'm right below the poverty line and getting a job has been difficult, even for a fast food place. Waiting for KFC to call up dammit... and still applying to other places, but I can tell not having prior work experience really holds me back. So... yeah, I dont know what to do and I'm questioning if I should just stop going to college.


I took the community college route for various reasons, one of which being that my family is in the lower income bracket and in no way could help me get through higher education. I would have to pay my own way. I was working full time and trying to take advantage of any grants or scholarships I could get my hands on. If you live in the US, the Pell Grant would likely apply to you due to your low income. Learn budgeting and to give up on things that you don't need, and you will be able to pay for school. I'm in my 4th year of higher education obtaining a CS degree as well, transferred to a large University, and still have no debt. It's possible if you work for it.

Now, on whether or not to go to college to get a CS degree, that is a tricky subject. With how many people that are trying to get into CS fields, employers like seeing that you have a degree and that you did well, but that is not the bottom line. If you have the skills and certifications (things you can get without schooling) you can obtain internships that lead to employment if you are good enough. There are different routes, but each of them is difficult. One thing is for sure, though. If you go into CS, you WILL USE MATH! More than just algebra and boolean logic. Discrete Structures and Linear Algebra are also extremely important, and to make best use of useful aspects of Linear, you will need at least a first course (maybe second as well) of calculus. Again, these can be self taught, but you will need them.

My advise, don't give up on college unless you are ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE you can teach yourself with the same drive you would if you were in college. Many people fall into the trap of leaving college because they think they can get an equal education on their own. Sad thing is that those are the people who end up in the manual labor, service, and at best, blue-collar jobs. Very few make it big without help.

2470 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 12/5/15 , edited 12/5/15
Pretty much took that route exactly and I can tell you for sure that you need to take those computer programming classes ASAP. I took them while at my community college and after 2 semesters you know exactly what you're in for. I ended up giving up on that career because I absolutely do not enjoy the idea of programming endlessly. Its definitely a career people are into for the money, there isn't much in terms of enjoyment in the field. If you're in it for the money it's a great field, but if you're looking for a career you enjoy everyday get a feel for it out now before you might feel like you get forced to work in the field because of how much time you put into college.
9463 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / M
Offline
Posted 12/5/15
Honestly, yes you should. I too am going for computer science, and I hate math as well, but I enjoy all my programming classes. My advice is that if you really don't wish to continue taking advanced math course to just switch your major. Like you I am in community college planning to transfer to a four year in the spring, but I unsure if I would want to continue to take math, as it is easily my least favorite subject, and instead switch to Political Science instead.

College isn't just about gaining the skills immediately relevant to your desired career. It's to give you general life skills, help you start networking, and it's also good on a resume. It will show your potential employer that you can commit to something for four years. So, like I said, if you really don't wish to continue with math, just switch to a major that appeals to you more.
5579 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
34 / M / Mexico
Offline
Posted 12/5/15
It depends on many things, some colleges are worth it, most of them are not; I have friends from different parts of the world, even first world countries, that didn't go to college and are doing pretty good in their trades or as artists, a few are even doing better than me financially, and I'm a college graduate.

Also, the thing I absolutely hated about college, and some other people agree, is that they program you to follow a specific mindset and almost never teach you to really innovate, rather, to repeat stablished patterns, and if you go outside of those patterns, you will not pass; I remember a friend of mine that, during a difficult engineering course, was asked to solve a problem, and he did it but without following the same process used by the professor and the rest of the class, so, it did not count as a solution. And that's just one of many examples.

Sometimes, you learn more from buying and reading the appropriate textbooks (and putting them to practice of course!) than from listening to, for lack of a better term, idiotic professors.

Also, a 'good' college is extremely expensive nowadays, if you took that money and invest it wisely, it could potentially be worth a lot more. It's up to you, follow your heart, just be sure that if you decide to drop college, unless you get extremely lucky somehow, you will have to work a trade or find something that keeps the money flowing.
Posted 12/5/15
I don't feel like it is. I graduated with my degree back in May, yet I still don't have a job. I've applied to countless places and they value experience over education a lot. This is just what happened to me though. I'm not saying you'll be in the same boat, but if you do consider anything....make sure you think it over carefully.
1859 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / US
Offline
Posted 12/5/15

dub2191 wrote:

I've been wondering if I should continue going to college. Right now I'm in a community college, was planning to transfer to a university after I've done my two years. I was going for Computer Science... but in all honesty, fuck that. Really found out after my first semester, I hate math. It's not a matter of it's difficult and I cannot understand it, I can learn it relatively quickly. I just hate doing it. I've been looking into computer programming instead, since it seems not so math intensive, just a good grip on algebra and Boolean logic. I honestly would like something to do with psychology, like a Psychiatrist, but also wanted something that has a good chance of me getting a job and support myself but wouldn't completely hate to do. So I'm asking now that my first semester has just ended... what should I do? Also, I hate to use the word, but i guess I'm poor, so money is a huge factor and i do not want to be in an ocean of debt. BTW, I dont like to say I'm poor because I look at myself above others, but because I know people who are worst off and feel like I have no right to say I'm poor, but relatively in the US, I'm right below the poverty line and getting a job has been difficult, even for a fast food place. Waiting for KFC to call up dammit... and still applying to other places, but I can tell not having prior work experience really holds me back. So... yeah, I dont know what to do and I'm questioning if I should just stop going to college.


Generally, if you do it right, college will help. It opens up opportunities that you might otherwise not have. I'm an engineer so I can't speak directly to computer science but most professions use applied math versus what can seem like dry, boring stuff in class. It's a lot more interesting when you actually use it in your profession. What I suggest is this: Don't limit your options after one semester. There's a reason college is four (or more years). Take the basic courses in computer science, psychology, etc. as well as trying to do some of your general requirements. That will give you a better taste for what you like. You could always end up doing computer science with a minor in psychology. That doesn't keep you from being a psychiatrist. I actually know several people that went from engineering to psychology.

As your finding out, work experience is huge in finding a job. You might try seeing what options your school has for student jobs. A lot of financial aid packages will have you working part time for the school while you take classes. That gives you experience and helps reduce the financial burden. During summers, apply for internship programs. The more experience you can get in a field related to what your looking for, the better your job chances are after graduation. It also helps you narrow down what you do and do not like in a actual job as well as network with people in the profession.

I would suggest that you don't stop unless you 100% certain college is not for you. Maybe reduce the number of classes you take at one time if it's too much of a financial burden. Just getting in the rhythm of classes and studying can be really hard if you take a break. Plus, even if you're taking one class at a time, you're working towards a goal.
98 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 12/5/15
Thank You all for your answers!!! Really did help and gave me some insight on what I should do.


GotenLoooovesCorn wrote:

I ended up giving up on that career because I absolutely do not enjoy the idea of programming endlessly. Its definitely a career people are into for the money, there isn't much in terms of enjoyment in the field.


Exactly why I'm considering to change my major, I want something more fulfilling while also being able to support myself. Getting a lot of money is not my #1 priority but being able to atleast have a roof over my head and food, is.


Bowie-Sensei wrote:

College isn't just about gaining the skills immediately relevant to your desired career. It's to give you general life skills, help you start networking, and it's also good on a resume. It will show your potential employer that you can commit to something for four years. So, like I said, if you really don't wish to continue with math, just switch to a major that appeals to you more.


Exactly what I've been thinking. I probably will switch my major soon.
98 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 12/5/15

gabuhaha wrote:


dub2191 wrote:

I've been wondering if I should continue going to college. Right now I'm in a community college, was planning to transfer to a university after I've done my two years. I was going for Computer Science... but in all honesty, fuck that. Really found out after my first semester, I hate math. It's not a matter of it's difficult and I cannot understand it, I can learn it relatively quickly. I just hate doing it. I've been looking into computer programming instead, since it seems not so math intensive, just a good grip on algebra and Boolean logic. I honestly would like something to do with psychology, like a Psychiatrist, but also wanted something that has a good chance of me getting a job and support myself but wouldn't completely hate to do. So I'm asking now that my first semester has just ended... what should I do? Also, I hate to use the word, but i guess I'm poor, so money is a huge factor and i do not want to be in an ocean of debt. BTW, I dont like to say I'm poor because I look at myself above others, but because I know people who are worst off and feel like I have no right to say I'm poor, but relatively in the US, I'm right below the poverty line and getting a job has been difficult, even for a fast food place. Waiting for KFC to call up dammit... and still applying to other places, but I can tell not having prior work experience really holds me back. So... yeah, I dont know what to do and I'm questioning if I should just stop going to college.


Generally, if you do it right, college will help. It opens up opportunities that you might otherwise not have. I'm an engineer so I can't speak directly to computer science but most professions use applied math versus what can seem like dry, boring stuff in class. It's a lot more interesting when you actually use it in your profession. What I suggest is this: Don't limit your options after one semester. There's a reason college is four (or more years). Take the basic courses in computer science, psychology, etc. as well as trying to do some of your general requirements. That will give you a better taste for what you like. You could always end up doing computer science with a minor in psychology. That doesn't keep you from being a psychiatrist. I actually know several people that went from engineering to psychology.

As your finding out, work experience is huge in finding a job. You might try seeing what options your school has for student jobs. A lot of financial aid packages will have you working part time for the school while you take classes. That gives you experience and helps reduce the financial burden. During summers, apply for internship programs. The more experience you can get in a field related to what your looking for, the better your job chances are after graduation. It also helps you narrow down what you do and do not like in a actual job as well as network with people in the profession.

I would suggest that you don't stop unless you 100% certain college is not for you. Maybe reduce the number of classes you take at one time if it's too much of a financial burden. Just getting in the rhythm of classes and studying can be really hard if you take a break. Plus, even if you're taking one class at a time, you're working towards a goal.


Thanks for the advice! I guess I'm just getting very anxious about the future and what I should do, to where it's making the decisions harder and more complex than they should be. I'll do what you said and just get a feel for what I want. Just always hearing about the student debt and people not even getting jobs in the field they studied for and getting a low-end job that they could have gotten right after high school. I love to learn, but when it comes with a price, I become hesitant.
5019 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 12/5/15 , edited 12/5/15
Guess it just depends on what you want to do. With me, i'm going to be going through POST to get my LEO certification.
Posted 12/5/15
If this is too long for you to read, just read the bottom paragraph.

Where I live, not having an education does not mean that you will end up in poverty. Our country recognize that all jobs are important, in so much that wages are fairly evenly balanced across fields. A brain surgeon do get paid more, but it's not a ludicrous amount of money like it is in USA. Celebrities do not live in mansions. A politician, for instance, does not rely on funds to get paid, they get paid by the government, and they get paid roughly around the same as a teacher does. This, for instance, lowers corruption considerably, but that's another topic entirely. My point is, in most cases you'll end up with almost the same wage as everyone else, whether you're educated or not. The problem, is that workplaces in which you do not require an education, like a grocery store, will often do anything they can to avoid paying too much taxes. You know, to save more money, to expand their business. They have to pay taxes for each employee, and they have to pay more taxes when an employee has a 100% position. One way to save money, then, is to not have too many people working in a 100% position. So, they have a couple of core members with 100% positions, and then you'll most likely end up with a mere 60 or 40% position, having to look for an extra job, and having to balance working hours between these two jobs. At worst, you'll have to work three jobs, and at this point, you really need to be good at keeping an organized schedule. It really is shit.

What most people don't know, though, is that if your shitty ass workplace only gives you 60%, meaning you are most likely but not necessarily below the poverty limit, our government is obligated to pay you the other 40%, or to be more precise, obligated to get you over the poverty limit. This is why we do not have poverty in our country, no matter what some people might say. People in my country who say they live in poverty are morons who are whining about not being able to update their children's iPhone4 to iPhone5 (or whatever those iPhone versions are). No, I'm not spouting some weird Scandinavian version of Fox News bias here, I mean these people have the option to go to the welfare office to request more money, but they don't, either because they're ignorant or because they're stupid. These are the same people who think that a lack of money is why their children are turning into "problem children", when in reality, it's because they fail to care for their children emotionally by not taking part of their lives.

This method of eliminating poverty is great, but, welfare offices have regulations, and they can be a real bitch about it. A lot of the times, they don't seem to understand them themselves, and hand out half-assed pointers, reminders, some of which they forget to tell you, or tell you in a way so that you misunderstand them, so unless you bring a pen and some paper and write down everything they say and try to remember it as best you can, you're most likely going to end up not getting the money you need. There's so much confusion around things at welfare offices, and people who have to resort to going there usually aren't of the most cheerful bunch, for obvious reasons, and when they get frustrated, which happens a lot, they tend to blow up emotionally. It can be a real uphill battle at welfare offices, so if you struggle with depression, you're really--- really going to struggle there.

So, my advice is, get an education. Because no matter how you look at it, in no matter what country you're in, education is in place to improve your life, not make it harder, and that is not to say that it has been made harder to live without an education, deliberately.
39086 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Your friendly nei...
Offline
Posted 12/5/15
No
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.