STEM vs liberal arts in education debate.
Posted 12/7/15 , edited 12/7/15

I've been curious after researching an article as to why so many people favor STEM when one field does not overshadow another. Your input is much appreciated.


www.forbes.com/sites/johnebersole/2013/.../stem-vs-the-liberal-arts/‎

( ^Edit: link is broke but just google search STEM vs liberal arts)
3060 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 12/7/15
because you get to do cool stuff with STEM degrees.
Banned
17503 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / M / B.C, Canada
Offline
Posted 12/7/15
Well considering even in the Army my job opportunities were revolving around STEM fields I kinda have to agree with the validity of STEM being somewhat more important then liberal arts. But at the same time I value the kind of thinkers Liberal Arts produces.
RAZR31 
6028 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M
Offline
Posted 12/7/15 , edited 12/7/15
I feel like there could be several possibilities ranging anywhere from the fact that many of the specific fields that fall under STEM are new and exciting and they can interest many people on that alone all the way to it's just a simple matter of money. STEM fields are generally going to pay more.
37144 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 12/7/15
I think it's just the times we live in. The modern world places a high value on science/technology. Science and technology are advancing at a rapid pace and becoming ever more complicated, while expressing yourself artistically is easier than ever before.

It's also easier to find success in STEM through traditional learning and hard work. Being successful in the arts generally requires some innate talent, and arguably even more work. It's a rougher road for sure. You can be successful in either field though.
15742 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M
Offline
Posted 12/8/15
I do like STEM. I think it's great to excel in math and science. But there is one problem, yes they can build a bridge, but they still need lawyers to get that permit.

Same goes for liberal arts majors, we can permit such a thing but without anyone with the knowledge to create it, it will never happen.

Society needs both.

Posted 12/8/15
Depends. I heard they were lowering standards for certain ethnicities, and I feel divided by that.
599 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Connecticut
Offline
Posted 12/8/15

descloud wrote:

I do like STEM. I think it's great to excel in math and science. But there is one problem, yes they can build a bridge, but they still need lawyers to get that permit.

Same goes for liberal arts majors, we can permit such a thing but without anyone with the knowledge to create it, it will never happen.

Society needs both.



http://www.socialsciencespace.com/2015/08/japans-education-ministry-says-to-axe-social-science-and-humanities/

Japan doesn't think so
24570 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
33 / M / Baltimore, MD
Offline
Posted 12/8/15
We need both, but for different reasons. We need liberal arts to continue to provide things like literature, arts, music, movies, etc. But, we also need STEM for manufacturing, industrial purposes, and for other items which you'll find unexpected (for ex. I'm an engineer who works on cleaning up after environmental releases). You need to understand science, engineering, math basics in order to be able to do things like this. Medical also tends to fall under the S of STEM, so that's also included here.

But, another option we seem to be forgetting - vocational training. We need that as well. We need people trained and capable of doing repair work, assisting at nursing homes, installing air conditioning systems, welding, etc. Vocational training is an important field of study in our culture that to some look down on. I do not. It takes a certain skill set which I do not have to work as a welder (also a high paying profession without a 4 year degree); or an auto mechanic. My sister currently works as a certified nursing assistant in a nursing home. This was a vocational training course followed by certification. It's a need that we have in our society.

We need all three to have a fully developed society. One is not better as a whole - each are equally important. That said, you may be better inclined to do one over the other. I'm a math/science guy, so STEM was where it was at for me. Same with my wife. I have a brother who's an elementary school teacher, that clicks for him. My one sister is a CNA (as I mentioned previously) and that field of study, the vocational track worked for her. I have a friend who did the vocational track and is currently traveling the globe repairing mechanical equipment at manufacturing facilities making, quite frankly, more money than I do with my 6 years of college (BS & MS). Like I said - all of this, in the end, is what is going to work for you. Remember that.
22653 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / USA
Offline
Posted 12/8/15
Engineers rule.



It's mostly because of the degree of difficulty involved.
9551 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M
Offline
Posted 12/8/15
I think there is an unhealthy amount of people who just want to focus on the sciences without focusing on the humanities.
5037 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / Abyss
Offline
Posted 12/9/15
A lot of it is how easy it is to get a job with a STEM degree. I am a Geology major with a mathematics minor. I was an Engineer for 2 years as well. It brings me to a joke I heard that is fairly true in the USA.

An engineer asks how it works.
A scientist asks why it works.
A fine arts major asks "Do you want fries with that?"

Sadly this is very true in todays society. I know a few fine arts majors that had to go to STEM to get a job. One had a Masters in Music, one in Art, and one in Graphic Designing. They are now Engineers and Geologists.
Posted 12/9/15
Why do they have to be mutually exclusive? I study a science and know many people in my course who are into the arts and it's not just a passing interest, they're pretty skilled. On the other hand, the people I know studying arts or humanities are almost scientifically illiterate and couldn't switch to a science degree because they lack the skills.

The arts are important sure but unless you plan on being an academic, there are more effective ways to further a hobby than to pay through the nose for a degree.
Sailor Candy Moderator
200577 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28
Offline
Posted 12/14/15
op nuked. locked.
You must be logged in to post.