Post Reply Was there an animation difference in Naruto Shippudden ?
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Posted 12/10/15
Hi guys :)

I'm watching Naruto Shippudden now, but I have a question regarding the animation:

Was there any difference in the animation style in Shippudden then in part 1 Naruto ?

Because I have the feeling of something different but not new to me, and I don't know if this is a good thing or a bad

thing.

When I watched the first One Piece episode after the time skip, I had a feeling that this is something new to me

although the animation is the same.

And is the fact that I played the Ninja Storm series and that they hyped the Shippudden series for me an issue here ?

Posted 12/10/15
The animation goes from OK to amazing to utter shit.
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Posted 12/10/15

KarenAraragi wrote:

The animation goes from OK to amazing to utter shit.


I'll take a guess and the that the utter shit part is when the anime finishes the manga and

starts Buroto, right ?
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Posted 12/10/15
Overall animation remained largely the same. The aesthetic of many of the characters may feel different due to everyone having altered, older character designs after the time skip. But Naruto, just like any other long running shounen, has occasional fluctuations in the animation style as well as visual refinements over time.
Posted 12/10/15
The animation has always been different from the original Naruto.

I think long running anime that do a time skip have different animations WHICH I HATE :,(

Posted 12/10/15

The_Eye_0_0 wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:

The animation goes from OK to amazing to utter shit.


I'll take a guess and the that the utter shit part is when the anime finishes the manga and

starts Buroto, right ?


No. Is kind like well. You have to see it. Is mostly OK and Amazing when it need to be. But sometimes is bad, really really bad. You have to watch has many episodes has me to understand what I mean.
But to show you, here some that bad animation.
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Posted 12/10/15
People always bring up that Pain fight as bad animation, but in motion that entire episode looks absolutely fantastic. Yes, it is stylistically very different from the rest of Naruto Shippuuden, but that doesn't mean it's poor animation. In those cases they purposeful stretch out the characters faces in order to impart the immense amount of force that he's applying with his attacks.

Here's an excerpt from an ANN article about Sakuga that talks about that scene and inconsistency in animation of long running shounen better than I ever could.


There are special cases too, shows the very structure of which help this process happen. Anyone who has watched a long running anime must be aware that their production values tend to be anything but consistent, as animating a show airing weekly for years is a huge endeavor. Corners are cut, outsourcing becomes an even bigger factor and a staff rotation is put in place to make the project sustainable. Yet when it reaches a climactic moment, they seem to go all out. Series that usually have to make do with unimpressive visuals have some of the most incredible highlights in the whole industry, and that stark contrast has been the wakeup call for many sakuga fans out there. As effective as those highlights are to catch people's attention however, them being so noticeable is a double edged sword. Not all fans are open to change, and an episode that looks fairly different to the rest (especially within a long running series they might have been following for years) isn't always welcome. Possibly the best known instance of this is still Naruto Shippūden #167, still a source of controversy to this day; Pierrot trusted the veteran Atsushi Wakabayashi to deliver something truly unique for one of the most important fights in the entire series, and the end result left no one indifferent. Wakabayashi directed, storyboarded and supervised the animation of the episode, which was a non-stop kinetic explosion made by just a few key animators, a mix of new talent and industry legends. Shingo Yamashita's work – about 7 minutes worth of animation he did by himself – sums up what that episode was like: a raw outburst of motion that often disregarded staying on-model in favor of stylization. There is a lot to love in there from an animation standpoint, from the flat but effective FX animation to the plentiful usage of debris to accentuate the impact of the fight. Wakabayashi is no fool either, his brilliant storyboard tightly controlled that seemingly unrestrained animation, he built action around the idea of that non-stop crazy motion and ended up with a fight that flowed incredibly well. A memorable display of the strengths of this medium.

That of course wasn't enough, and many people reacted poorly to an unconventional look they weren't used to. It was different, it was weird, and so it was bad. The poor reaction to it lead to assumptions that they put no effort, that it was a low budget outing, and that the staff must simply not have cared. Not exactly a healthy attitude when approaching art, even in the case of styles as divisive as that. This isn't to say that everyone must come to love all unorthodox approaches, but at least respecting the craft seems like the sensible choice. There is a reason studios trust people like Wakabayashi for those climactic moments, their unique touch might not please all casual fans but the artists themselves love it.
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