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Post Reply Thoughts about Anime that ends partway
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Posted 12/28/15
Any else notice how anime rarely goes beyond the half point. I have seen many series that cut out at 12 but answering nothing. Where they show as if planned for more episodes but we wait and wait for it to get finished. Like yona of the dawn nesekoi attack on titian and high school of the dead
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Posted 12/28/15
So what's the challendge here?
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22 / M / Fraxinus
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Posted 12/28/15
Well, I don't know about High School of the Dead, but Yona of the Dawn did have 2 cours, and it's to my understanding that Attack on Titan is getting another season, and Nisekoi had multiple seasons, so those aren't the best examples.

Anyway, I feel like this is pretty much a thread asking why current anime don't go on for absurd amounts of episodes, in disguise. Basically, money, or lack of source material. After all, it would be foolish to commit to a large number of episodes without knowing the ratings it would get.
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Posted 12/28/15 , edited 12/28/15
Six different answers, or a mix of, depending on the case.

1) Simplest one, the series flopped so they're not going to make any more.

2) The series was successful, but there isn't enough source material to make more. This was true for Attack on Titan (which now has a greenlit second season for 2016), Btooom, High School of the Dead, and many others.

3) The series was successful, but there isn't an immediate opportunity to schedule a sequel since the studio probably had their next project (or three or more) already in the pipeline; same can be true of the director and other staff.

4) The series was successful, but diminishing returns makes a sequel a bad investment. Very few shows are endless money trains, profits tend to drop off noticeably after the initial surge of fans throwing their money at a thing.

5) The series was successful, but even if diminishing returns isn't a major factor when the numbers got crunched it was apparent the time, money, and resources would be better spent on other projects from a financial perspective.

6) It was only supposed to be a partial adaptation in the first place.

This is especially common with light novels but also for most manga, if a publisher thinks they've got a winner they'll help pay to make a short anime of it. This draws attention to the source material, which is where people who want the full story will go (and where the publisher will make most of their money back). And it gives the fans of the light novel who also like anime (usually a pretty large overlapping contingent) an entree of the story in a medium they enjoy.

And by pushing a story in multiple formats the producers maximize their income across the potential fanbase while also significantly increasing brand recognition, which will increase sales of toys and other merchandise.

Which is where a huge part of the overall profits of a series will come from on average, far more than DVD/BD sales.

But usually a full adaptation of a light novel or manga series is much too resource-intensive to be realistic. Plus the way the investors get their money back becomes a factor. Light novel adaptations are largely financed by their publishers. If the show is a hit, people go out and buy the books, returning money to the publisher. But if the publisher then pays for a second season people aren't all going to go buy the books twice, if they wanted them then they already have them.
JuJu26 
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Posted 12/28/15

reddragon1x wrote:

Any else notice how anime rarely goes beyond the half point. I have seen many series that cut out at 12 but answering nothing. Where they show as if planned for more episodes but we wait and wait for it to get finished. Like yona of the dawn nesekoi attack on titian and high school of the dead


Two Things:

1. Your title mislead me as there is no challenge and for that, you must pay!

2. To be a grammar nazi, you misspelled challenge...
JuJu26 
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Posted 12/28/15

Insomnist wrote:

Six different answers, or a mix of, depending on the case.

1) Simplest one, the series flopped so they're not going to make any more.

2) The series was successful, but there isn't enough source material to make more. This was true for Attack on Titan (which now has a greenlit second season for 2016), Btooom, High School of the Dead, and many others.

3) The series was successful, but there isn't an immediate opportunity to schedule a sequel since the studio probably had their next project (or three or more) already in the pipeline; same can be true of the director and other staff.

4) The series was successful, but diminishing returns makes a sequel a bad investment. Very few shows are endless money trains, profits tend to drop off noticeably after the initial surge of fans throwing their money at a thing.

5) The series was successful, but even if diminishing returns isn't a major factor when the numbers got crunched it was apparent the time, money, and resources would be better spent on other projects from a financial perspective.

6) It was only supposed to be a partial adaptation in the first place.

This is especially common with light novels but also for most manga, if a publisher thinks they've got a winner they'll help pay to make a short anime of it. This draws attention to the source material, which is where people who want the full story will go (and where the publisher will make most of their money back). And it gives the fans of the light novel who also like anime (usually a pretty large overlapping contingent) an entree of the story in a medium they enjoy.

And by pushing a story in multiple formats the producers maximize their income across the potential fanbase while also significantly increasing brand recognition, which will increase sales of toys and other merchandise.

Which is where a huge part of the overall profits of a series will come from on average, far more than DVD/BD sales.

But usually a full adaptation of a light novel or manga series is much too resource-intensive to be realistic. Plus the way the investors get their money back becomes a factor. Light novel adaptations are largely financed by their publishers. If the show is a hit, people go out and buy the books, returning money to the publisher. But if the publisher then pays for a second season people aren't all going to go buy the books twice, if they wanted them then they already have them.



^ This.

In the end, it's a business and they gotta make money to either make more, keep the people employed, or fill their greedy desires...
Sogno- 
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Posted 12/28/15
i honestly think many anime fans have no idea that the majority of anime is created from other sources like manga, video games, and novels
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Posted 12/28/15 , edited 12/28/15


BigChocolate wrote:
So what's the challendge here?


JuJu26 wrote:
1. Your title mislead me as there is no challenge and for that, you must pay!


I've changed the title to reflect the contents of the opening post more accurately.


Sogno- wrote:

i honestly think many anime fans have no idea that the majority of anime is created from other sources like manga, video games, and novels


Yup. Until I started reading CR's forums I had no idea just how much of anime is based on other sources. At first I thought it was just some, and that it would be just based on a manga, but that otherwise it was original programming. I did quickly catch on to how much of it was a key part of merchandising and increasing source sales for sources other than manga. I was really confused the first time I saw an anime based on a dating-sim VN that used the method of just showing several routes and not blending it into a single story. At that point I hadn't even really known what a VN was, but once I did learn it certainly explained some of the lackluster quality of some shows (particularly harem shows, which I actually pretty much like)!
JuJu26 
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Posted 12/28/15

lorreen wrote:

I've changed the title to reflect the contents of the opening post more accurately.


Yup. Until I started reading CR's forums I had no idea just how much of anime is based on other sources. At first I thought it was just some, and that it would be just based on a manga, but that otherwise it was original programming. I did quickly catch on to how much of it was a key part of merchandising and increasing source sales for sources other than manga. I was really confused the first time I saw an anime based on a dating-sim VN that used the method of just showing several routes and not blending it into a single story. At that point I hadn't even really known what a VN was, but once I did learn it certainly explained some of the lackluster quality of some shows (particularly harem shows, which I actually pretty much like)!


Thanks! I started figuring it all out when I was a freshmen in high school, then I started knowing the facts when I was 18.

I love Anime that is original, where it does not follow a Manga, LN, or VN because you get to see the work of writers that have an idea and see that idea become a work that unfolds into an Anime. (Ex: Gen Urobutchi, some of Jun Maeda's works, Watanabe).
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Posted 12/28/15
Mentioned a thousand times already but...

Most adapted works are meant to advertise the source material. There is no point really in adapting the entire work, it is better to adapt part of it and then have people read or play the rest. Exceptions are anime that sell so well on their own that it is worth adapting the entire thing or even creating anime original seasons. But for most, a second season to finish adapting the source material will not increase the sales of the source material. Everyone who watches the first season and wants to see how it ends will buy the source material and read or play the rest of it to find out what happens.

The other exception is they may finish one source work's adaptation if there is a follow-on or spinoff source work. Basically they want to advertise the other work. Same goes for live action, movies, anime may be used as an advertising vehicle since most late night anime is competing with informercials and is in fact an infomercial with ads for the anime itself, the theme song CDs, concerts by the seiyuu, other manga and light novels made by the publisher, etc.
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Posted 12/28/15
For those who have mentioned my grammar. You are undoubtedly right my writing was atrocious.
Also the title should have been my frustrations. I am glad to informed of the new seasons for those animes.
One thing I do love about crunchyroll is that it has the highest chance for new additions to an anime. Where as funimation rarely finishes most of there animes (basically most of the animes they have end in a cataclysmic failure). I don't mean that an anime has to go on and on, though if one does is that truly a bad thing. What I want in an ending is plot points that are addressed not empty points.
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Posted 12/28/15


Unfortunately I can't do this with live Anime but personally I try to avoid shows with a "Want to know more? Read that Manga!" ending whenever I'm looking for a filler between seasons but as Insomnist said, there are a number of reasons why it could have ended early; sadly it happens far too often
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Posted 12/28/15

reddragon1x wrote:

For those who have mentioned my grammar. You are undoubtedly right my writing was atrocious.
Also the title should have been my frustrations. I am glad to informed of the new seasons for those animes.
One thing I do love about crunchyroll is that it has the highest chance for new additions to an anime. Where as funimation rarely finishes most of there animes (basically most of the animes they have end in a cataclysmic failure). I don't mean that an anime has to go on and on, though if one does is that truly a bad thing. What I want in an ending is plot points that are addressed not empty points.


Funimation and Crunchyroll never has much influence on whether or not another season got made. Up until recently they just licensed anime. This has been changing lately but still just to a small degree. For the most part the publisher of the source material decides whether or not to make more seasons. So make sure you don't shoot the messenger.
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Posted 12/28/15
You make a solid point. There is a difference between the companies though. Crunchyroll tends to be updated much faster. Where as funimation does the same thing only for select animes. Allot of the animes take a long time for them to add the new seasons. When they are already out. Though I guess it makes sense. Funimation capitalizes on dvds while crunchyroll does so on streaming.
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Posted 12/28/15
The both companies are awesome in there own right. I was just venting. A new anime I have been watching took longer to update its episodes. I no longer have a reason to bash or sound ignorant. In short anime is love and love is anime
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