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Post Reply New Year Traditional Food
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Posted 1/1/16
I think I made this thread last year, but I couldn't find it, and there are new peeps.

You guys eat any traditional foods for the New Year?

Here, my family eats cabbage and black eyed peas. Usually, we make cornbread with it, but the cabbage and peas are the traditional part.
Posted 1/1/16
I think I remember that thread from last year because cabbage and black eyed peas sounds terrible, and I remember hearing of that a while back, and it sounded terrible then. Why not steak and eggs? Cabbage and black eyed peas? Way a boring way to start of the new year.
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Posted 1/1/16
A lot of people here would buy fruits for a fruitful year or eat anything with noodles for a long life.

As for my family, we don't have a specific traditional food for new year. We just prepare a few special dishes to celebrate and that's it.
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Posted 1/1/16
Pizza + beer.
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Posted 1/1/16
Pork and sauerkraut here That is our tradition in my family , even though IMO I hate the taste of both of them since the pork is dry and the cabbage is nasty!
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Posted 1/1/16 , edited 1/1/16
Chop up a stick of pepperoni, block of cheese, and eat them on crackers. Besides that mixed nuts, chocolate, liquor, shrimp, bacon wrapped scallops and various appetizers, that's been the thing for the past many years here.

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Posted 1/1/16

ZENI7H wrote:

I think I remember that thread from last year because cabbage and black eyed peas sounds terrible, and I remember hearing of that a while back, and it sounded terrible then. Why not steak and eggs? Cabbage and black eyed peas? Way a boring way to start of the new year.


I actually love both, if prepared right. If you're eating black eyed peas from a can, you're doing it wrong. hehe.

There are reasons that it became a tradition, after the Civil War (hardship conditions). You can look it up.

For us, now days, the peas are for luck and the cabbage is for money.


Also, rather than boiling the cabbage, we've started stir-frying it. Freaking delicious.
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Posted 1/1/16 , edited 1/2/16

KnightOfZero1991 wrote:

Chop up a stick of pepperoni, block of cheese, and eat them on crackers. Besides that mixed nuts, chocolate, liquor, shrimp, bacon wrapped scallops and various appetizers, that's been the thing for the past many years here.



Where's my invite!?!? Sounds so good. I'll bring cabbage and peas!
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Posted 1/1/16
Fish tacos after some heavy drinking of any alcoholic beverage.
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Posted 1/1/16

kinga750 wrote:

Pizza + beer.


Cold Pizza and warm Beer, the breakfast of Champions!


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Posted 1/1/16
When I was a child, we would have a breakfast strata (a casserole consisting of a mushroom and egg custard - not sweet, but savory, with black pepper and a dash of mustard - poured over layers of dense bread and sage-laced sausage, and topped with cheddar and Monterrey Jack cheese), orange juice and my late step-father's brutally strong coffee (he used to call espresso a 'nice first attempt'). My mother picked up the recipe from my Canadian-born uncle. It was astoundingly easy to make the night before, adequately fed a family of seven growing kids and filled everyone up until mid-afternoon dinner. It was the go-to breakfast for both Christmas and New Year's Day. Over the years, I've made a number of different versions of it, in a much smaller pan, but it really wouldn't feel like a holiday morning without the stuff. It is, however, a bit heavy for anyone who doesn't have to shovel tons of snow after the meal, which was also a tradition.
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Posted 1/1/16 , edited 1/1/16

Abyssinian1 wrote:

When I was a child, we would have a breakfast strata (a casserole consisting of a mushroom and egg custard - not sweet, but savory, with black pepper and a dash of mustard - poured over layers of dense bread and sage-laced sausage, and topped with cheddar and Monterrey Jack cheese), orange juice and my late step-father's brutally strong coffee (he used to call espresso a 'nice first attempt'). My mother picked up the recipe from my Canadian-born uncle. It was astoundingly easy to make the night before, adequately fed a family of seven growing kids and filled everyone up until mid-afternoon dinner. It was the go-to breakfast for both Christmas and New Year's Day. Over the years, I've made a number of different versions of it, in a much smaller pan, but it really wouldn't feel like a holiday morning without the stuff. It is, however, a bit heavy for anyone who doesn't have to shovel tons of snow after the meal, which was also a tradition.


That sounds good,well expect the cheese part..Stuff would not agree with my lactose intolerance.
Posted 1/1/16
Cakes
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Posted 1/1/16 , edited 1/1/16

HolyDrumstick wrote:

I think I made this thread last year, but I couldn't find it, and there are new peeps.

You guys eat any traditional foods for the New Year?

Here, my family eats cabbage and black eyed peas. Usually, we make cornbread with it, but the cabbage and peas are the traditional part.


Noodle soup, being the Japanese tradition for luck and fortune in the new year, is the perfect hot, satisfying food that can be made in a kitchen you haven't cleaned up yet from last night. :)
(Especially if you use the packet variety, and load it up with spinach, goodies, and a drop of sesame oil.)

For those early to bed and early to rise, either a ham quarter in the oven, or fresh split-pea soup in the slow-cooker were foods I always associated with the New Year's parades, growing up.
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23 / M / AZ
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Posted 1/1/16
My family slaughters a hog for New Years.
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