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Post Reply New Year Traditional Food
Werina 
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Posted 1/1/16
No
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For me, a noodle nabe dish is always had. Basically a hot pot of sorts. Noodles symbolize longevity. Nabe dishes are easy to make, healthy, and delicious. I make them every few days so it's not so different from our regular meals, but holiday nabe will have better ingredients and more elaborate preparation. I often add mochi to it.

There is always some fish as well. Fish symbolizes plenty. Grandma often will make a stir fried vermicelli dish with scallops and mushrooms and pork belly in the Taiwanese style.

We used to eat shark fin or Buddha Jumps Over the Wall, but shark fin is hard to come by these days. Last time I made Buddha Jumps Over the Wall was probably about 3 or 4 years ago. It's good with red vinegar and thinly sliced strips of ginger.

I rarely stay home on NYE but I'll always have some soup at home before I set out to kindle the carnage.
Marthh 
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Posted 1/1/16
We make fresh rice cake (mochi)
It's really yummy
Sogno- 
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In my part of the country we eat collards and black eyed peas

Theres a reason for this something about money idk
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Posted 1/1/16
We just have the rest of the roast meats from Christmas or leftovers were cooked in soups or rice dishes. There's also the rest of the fruit cake, and some of this.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hallaca
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47 / F / 5280 feet above s...
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There are several brands of semi-hard shredded cheese made from milk in which the lactose was converted to something more digestible via enzymes. You'd probably have to look a little harder for them though, as supermarkets in the U.S. tend to segregate 'special' products like this into their own corner, or place them with the organic and/or high end dairy product brands.

As I live in an area that appreciates green chiles, I've come to add about 3/4 cup of chopped green Hatch chiles that I grew, roasted and froze during the fall garden harvest. They add a nice bit of spiciness to dish. Substituting chopped, pre-browned chorizo for the sage sausage (or turkey sausage with some cayenne pepper flakes) is also good. Breakfast strata casseroles are pretty versatile. As long as the bread used has some substance (no mushy white bread - heavier loaves of rustic bread are better, though you could even swap those out with other things if you needed a gluten-free option), the rest of the ingredients are flexible, though it is pretty hard to do without eggs and have it come out right. I've never tried it with egg substitute or just whites.
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Posted 1/1/16

HolyDrumstick wrote:

I think I made this thread last year, but I couldn't find it, and there are new peeps.

You guys eat any traditional foods for the New Year?

Here, my family eats cabbage and black eyed peas. Usually, we make cornbread with it, but the cabbage and peas are the traditional part.

That's awesome my family and I do the same thing, luck and money
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Posted 1/1/16
It's a tradition in my family to always bake cinnamon rolls every Christmas and New Years morning. And we've recently started making biscuits and gravy along with them.
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Posted 1/1/16

Morbidhanson wrote:

For me, a noodle nabe dish is always had. Basically a hot pot of sorts. Noodles symbolize longevity. Nabe dishes are easy to make, healthy, and delicious. I make them every few days so it's not so different from our regular meals, but holiday nabe will have better ingredients and more elaborate preparation. I often add mochi to it.

There is always some fish as well. Fish symbolizes plenty. Grandma often will make a stir fried vermicelli dish with scallops and mushrooms and pork belly in the Taiwanese style.

We used to eat shark fin or Buddha Jumps Over the Wall, but shark fin is hard to come by these days. Last time I made Buddha Jumps Over the Wall was probably about 3 or 4 years ago. It's good with red vinegar and thinly sliced strips of ginger.

I rarely stay home on NYE but I'll always have some soup at home before I set out to kindle the carnage.


I was watching the anime Garo Crimson moon this winter season and the last episode all the voice actors and couple producers go to the single female Seiyus house and watch final episode with a dish similar its in a big hot pot in middle of the table. Looks good very communal makes people interact as they pass the bowls around nice dish when cold outside.
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Posted 1/2/16 , edited 1/2/16
I'm from the Netherlands, and to celebrate the New Year we traditionally eat oliebollen on New Year's Eve. They're the predecessors to donuts, so they are pretty similar in taste. They're basically deep fried balls of dough, plain or mixed with raisins. Then you load 'em up with some good old powdered sugar and you're ready to go. An other food we eat are "appelbeignets" which are apple slices covered in the batter for oliebollen (I guess you're supposed to make a different kind of batter, but who has time for that?) and then tossed into a deep fryer. Also eaten with a generous load of powdered sugar.

Oliebollen are supposedly a very old tradition, dating back to Germanic tribes who would offer them to spirits. A famous Dutch artist painted a woman carrying some oliebollen in 1652:


Oliebollen stands start popping up somewhere around October, but then most people don't care at all. On December 31st, there are crazy long lines, people try to avoid them by getting up early, but even then there's lines:


On January 1st we eat stale oliebollen as a hangover cure.
Banned
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 1/2/16

Abyssinian1 wrote:

There are several brands of semi-hard shredded cheese made from milk in which the lactose was converted to something more digestible via enzymes. You'd probably have to look a little harder for them though, as supermarkets in the U.S. tend to segregate 'special' products like this into their own corner, or place them with the organic and/or high end dairy product brands.

As I live in an area that appreciates green chiles, I've come to add about 3/4 cup of chopped green Hatch chiles that I grew, roasted and froze during the fall garden harvest. They add a nice bit of spiciness to dish. Substituting chopped, pre-browned chorizo for the sage sausage (or turkey sausage with some cayenne pepper flakes) is also good. Breakfast strata casseroles are pretty versatile. As long as the bread used has some substance (no mushy white bread - heavier loaves of rustic bread are better, though you could even swap those out with other things if you needed a gluten-free option), the rest of the ingredients are flexible, though it is pretty hard to do without eggs and have it come out right. I've never tried it with egg substitute or just whites.


Yeah but have you tried that kind of stuff, it tastes awful. Besides if I am that desperate I can always pop some lactase enzyme, stuff always leaves bad taste in my mouth.

But a little experimenting with your strata casserole and I find a soy milk based white sauce is a perfectly acceptable substitute for cheese.
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26 / F / West Friendship,...
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Posted 1/2/16
I had some french fries for dinner, and for dessert Ben & Jerry's Americone Dream xD
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Kazamatsuri
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Posted 1/2/16

kinga750 wrote:

Pizza + beer.


I ate the same
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47 / F / 5280 feet above s...
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Good to know you found an acceptable substitute :-) Strata are very forgiving as far as ingredients, provided you bake them long enough and there's a decent wet-to-dry ratio. I prefer using the low-fat cheeses, like mozzarella, Havarti and provolone, because I don't like excess grease, which can result if you use nothing but Cheddar. Gruyere works well too, but it's expensive here.

The other thing I usually partake of on New Years is mochi. It's a habit I picked up from some friends, long ago (we won't mention the mimosas-as-hangover-mitigation). I found I liked the little red-bean-and-rice confections and as there's a tradition of rice dishes and candies (plus the mandarin oranges one can squeeze into champagne to make a mimosa) for New Year's Day there, I incorporated it into the last of the holiday indulgences. Thankfully, I can purchase them and don't have to go through the trouble of making them.
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