Post Reply Dense urban cities or low density suburbs which will be the future of urban living?
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24 / M / USA
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Posted 1/5/16
Are cities or suburbs going to become the dominant geographic regions of the future? some geographers claim that suburbs are dying, and the population is moving back to urban centers. but other theorists say the opposite, that sprawl will continue. which do you think will happen, and why?
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24 / F / United States, DE
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Posted 1/5/16
I think eventually we will have to condense, based solely on population growth. Which is growing exponentially.

Given, that growth is more pronounced in areas of the world that are not as advanced technologically. But it will still catch up to places that are more advanced in time.

We are going to be hurting for space to live in the not so distant future.
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23 / M / AZ
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Posted 1/5/16
In Phoenix sprawl is king
Banned
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 1/5/16
Urban Density is going to happen sooner or later..only so much space on this still green earth. Though not for much longer if the plebs don't start building up and down instead of up.
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46 / F / Reston, VA, USA
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Posted 1/5/16
City and suburban living comes and goes in waves. Technology during the industrial revolution caused mass migration from rural areas to cities for jobs in the textile industry. As cities became more and more filthy with the coal smoke and pollution from the industry, people who could afford to moved further out of the cities. Immigrants to the US initially moved into cities, but soon joined the move westward working on the railroads hoping to get their own homesteads. As technology progressed, cities again became centers of industry and information leading to the building of skyscrapers and large industrial complexes, yet again people moved out of the cities as crime and urban decay set in. Currently we're seeing a wave of gentrification and people moving back into the cities, but we will eventually see the same migration to move out of the cities.
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Posted 1/5/16 , edited 1/5/16
In the UK urban sprawl will continue clustered around major population centers and commerical hubs, this will be exacerbated by rising population and laxing housing planning laws in green areas.

The US has significantly more room to handle demand, so developing in urban areas is more viable. In addition, US commerical activity has stagnated so growth in other areas like mining means population will be less urban. If transportation prices increase and house demand drop, density very well might increase.
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Posted 1/5/16

Razor_Girl wrote:

City and suburban living comes and goes in waves. Technology during the industrial revolution caused mass migration from rural areas to cities for jobs in the textile industry. As cities became more and more filthy with the coal smoke and pollution from the industry, people who could afford to moved further out of the cities. Immigrants to the US initially moved into cities, but soon joined the move westward working on the railroads hoping to get their own homesteads. As technology progressed, cities again became centers of industry and information leading to the building of skyscrapers and large industrial complexes, yet again people moved out of the cities as crime and urban decay set in. Currently we're seeing a wave of gentrification and people moving back into the cities, but we will eventually see the same migration to move out of the cities.


Interesting analysis I think high density cities like NYC are where the majority of the people will live in the future with robots working the farms.
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Posted 1/5/16 , edited 1/5/16
The demographics will continue to shift based upon the preferences of each generation and geographic location.

In Washington, DC, for example, large scale urban renewal is resulting in a massive influx of young, affluent, highly education individuals. These people have been choosing to remain in the city as they marry and start families, choosing close proximity to entertainment and work over a long commute.

Much of the cost savings for lower rent in the suburbs (1 hour+ commute to see a significant rent reduction in a good neighborhood) are offset by no requirement to own a vehicle.


biscuitnote wrote:
Interesting analysis I think high density cities like NYC are where the majority of the people will live in the future with robots working the farms.

Fully automated greenhouses are already popular in the DC area, producing much of the locally grown produce sold at farmers markets.
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46 / F / Reston, VA, USA
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Posted 1/5/16

biscuitnote wrote:

Interesting analysis I think high density cities like NYC are where the majority of the people will live in the future with robots working the farms.


High density cities are not a good place to be when a disaster, natural or otherwise occurs. I've survived Hurricane Katrina and you can bet when I can afford to move away from the city I will.
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Posted 1/5/16

Razor_Girl wrote:


biscuitnote wrote:

Interesting analysis I think high density cities like NYC are where the majority of the people will live in the future with robots working the farms.


High density cities are not a good place to be when a disaster, natural or otherwise occurs. I've survived Hurricane Katrina and you can bet when I can afford to move away from the city I will.


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