Post Reply Your Friend Doesn't Say Anything about It
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18 / M / Crimson Mage Village
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Posted 1/10/16
So, just recently I've been informed that my knowledge of certain vocabulary was...not quite correct.

Apparently when I talked with my friend I would use the word "voluptuous" when I meant to say "voluminous", "obsequies" where "obsequious" was the intention ,and, occasionally, "tribadism" instead of "tribalism". Now, those were all honest and embarrassing mistakes and, in my defense, the last one was just an issue of miscommunication between pronunciation and interpretation, but it did get me thinking. For one, this friend of mine prides himself in his 'superior' knowledge of the English language-- many of us prefer asking him for help instead of the English teacher himself for the sake of accuracy-- and yet, he has let the issue of my ignorance go unattended to for the longest time. Was he holding back to save me face? Did he let it go to laugh behind my back? Is he really not as knowledgeable as expected?
To put it in more relatable terms, I guess it's more like if you were talking with a friend and later realize you had dried snot in your nose but it was never mentioned. Something like that.
Most of you probably do this to your own friends, but how does it feel when it happens to you? Am I thinking too deeply into this?
I'm not a sociopath, am I?



-of course, I'm getting back at him with what I do best-- making ridiculous yet somewhat believable lies about history-- so, at least there's solace in vengeance...
Posted 1/10/16
I'm a little confused....

Do you mean that he has good english spelling and grammar skills in class but doesn't in his personal relationships?
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Posted 1/10/16

ISeaDreamer wrote:

I'm a little confused....

Do you mean that he has good english spelling and grammar skills in class but doesn't in his personal relationships?


That's something I want to know as well. Although, in my experience, that isn't the case...usually...
Posted 1/10/16

TripleBakaKimidori wrote:

So, just recently I've been informed that my knowledge of certain vocabulary was...not quite correct.

Apparently when I talked with my friend I would use the word "voluptuous" when I meant to say "voluminous", "obsequies" where "obsequious" was the intention ,and, occasionally, "tribadism" instead of "tribalism". Now, those were all honest and embarrassing mistakes and, in my defense, the last one was just an issue of miscommunication between pronunciation and interpretation, but it did get me thinking. For one, this friend of mine prides himself in his 'superior' knowledge of the English language-- many of us prefer asking him for help instead of the English teacher himself for the sake of accuracy-- and yet, he has let the issue of my ignorance go unattended to for the longest time. Was he holding back to save me face? Did he let it go to laugh behind my back? Is he really not as knowledgeable as expected?
To put it in more relatable terms, I guess it's more like if you were talking with a friend and later realize you had dried snot in your nose but it was never mentioned. Something like that.
Most of you probably do this to your own friends, but how does it feel when it happens to you? Am I thinking too deeply into this?
I'm not a sociopath, am I?



-of course, I'm getting back at him with what I do best-- making ridiculous yet somewhat believable lies about history-- so, at least there's solace in vengeance...


I've been there, I used to pronounce stretch or any variation of the word as "skruhretch" but I don't think anyone even noticed my incorrect pronunciation, except for my friends brother who pointed it out. I think sometimes people don't even notice it or they do and if they're friends they think it's funny or don't really care cause they know what you mean.

Also the text I put in the bold reminds me of that one kid from Cardcaptor Sakura, he's cool I love tricksters.
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Posted 1/10/16

TripleBakaKimidori wrote:

and, occasionally, "tribadism" instead of "tribalism".

HAHAHA. Oh god the laughs I'd have if a friend made that mistake.


TripleBakaKimidori wrote:

For one, this friend of mine prides himself in his 'superior' knowledge of the English language-- many of us prefer asking him for help instead of the English teacher himself for the sake of accuracy-- and yet, he has let the issue of my ignorance go unattended to for the longest time. Was he holding back to save me face? Did he let it go to laugh behind my back? Is he really not as knowledgeable as expected?

I don't think so. I have a wide vocabulary, yet I do not flaunt it. I think it's more so his respect for you. I personally laugh at people who use magniloquence in order to 'show' that they are superior in debate or friendly discussions. For me, and likely your friend, the important thing is that the message got across.

I forget which writer, but there was a writer who once wrote a letter to a friend telling him that the more important thing about language is getting the message across. He told the friend that he preferred using smaller words that everyone knew rather than using big words that only a select few would know.
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