First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  Next  Last
Post Reply Should schools require uniforms? How strict should enforcement be?
35517 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
I can't say I ever had an experience where someone wore something that sincerely and substantively distracted from my learning experience. Furthermore, I don't think it's unreasonable to assume that students would be receiving lessons in consideration of appropriate attire outside of school. They would pick that up as members of an athletic team, or as volunteers/paid employees somewhere, or even just by attending events requiring certain clothing such as family gatherings or religious services. It's an essentially inevitable lesson. Then there's to consider the added cost of having two sets of shoes instead of one, two sets of blouses, skirts, pants, jewelry, and so on. After that there is to consider that attending school is compulsory, which means you can't draw a direct parallel between schools and other workplaces since entry into most other workplaces is voluntary. I could understand someone objecting to the uniform standards of a workplace they didn't even offer to participate in to begin with. Finally, I have concerns that discomfort from the uniform might itself prove distracting, a potential problem that would defeat the purpose of attending school in the first place. Dress shoes are uncomfortable, dress clothes do not tend to retain heat well, and jackets can end up retaining heat too well.

All told, it sounds like a lot of drawbacks in exchange for a payoff that could (and inevitably would) be obtained elsewhere. I don't see the point.
Posted 1/15/16

Dariamus wrote:

I am in favor of strict dress codes.

Way too many years in the military, and never once saw uniforms impeding individuality.

I've had children in school systems with a wide array of dress codes: a strict dress code made my life simpler.



Someone get a restraining order on P.V.
He's not allowed within 1000' of elementary or middle schools.


13275 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
I've seen pretty much nothing which suggests that uniforms offer any real improvement whatsoever from attendance, to bullying, to discipline etc.. Some suggest that there is a slight increase and some suggest that there is a slight decrease, but at the end of the day, the totality of the information I have seen leads me to believe that there really isn't much effect overall. Because of that, what is the point when the majority of students don't like uniforms?
88917 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
33 / M / South Yorkshire,...
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
Schools in this country all have uniforms except preschools.
4660 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
I'm okay with school uniforms since I grew up in a country where all children wear uniforms to school. In the 90s and 00s in the UK uniforms were on their way out so some schools had them and others didn't. Things changed so now almost all school use uniforms now.

What I don't like is that some school are forcing the students to buy uniforms from certain select shops. You used to be able to get a generic uniform in your school's colour anywhere even a local supermarket and you'd reserve spending more only for the school blazer at the school shop. Now they require logo'd jumpers, shirts, PE t-shirts and specific ties only bought at the school shop which is expensive. A child showing up in a generic uniform that looks the same but doesn't sport the logo on every item of clothing can risk punishment. Failing schools or schools with a lot of challenges became under new management. They had started rebranding themselves, changing uniforms and bringing in these strict rules. Some parents are struggling to keep up with these new costs. Their reasoning was that children should learn that they're at school to work and that they should look smart. It was a make over from the outside that some how would eventually help with the internal school improvements. I'm not buying that reasoning. Some schools are making deals with the official shop schools to set the prices of uniforms as a way of raising funds.

There's always room to express fashion after school, weekends and holidays. I don't think schools should insist children all wear formal dress shoes to school because they're doing a lot of running around so shoes should fit their use. I understand not wanting the shoes to be a way of advertising who's got the latest trainers/sneakers. They can ask for no obvious logos or large logos showing. Unfortunately some schools are banning use of trainers/sneakers and expect formal dress shoes which are okay for walking short distances but not for running around during breaks. I had trouble finding dress shoes to fit me when I was growing up because I have wide feet and most shops don't cater for that so getting a plain pair of trainers in the required school colour worked well. I used them to walk a mile to school sometimes when I didn't want to take a taxi. The music teacher didn't approve of my shoes, to her they didn't deserve being called shoes and were an insult which she made a point of letting me know.
2299 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
34 / F / US
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
i went to a school that required dress codes and also separated gils from boys, both did a wonderful job of maintaining focus on academics.
3389 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / F / Everywhere
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
I'd prefer school uniforms. It'd take away the stress of trying to pick out an outfit every morning. It'd also be harder to judge people based on what they wear.
46429 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / M / Sweden
Online
Posted 1/15/16
Both yes and no.

A lot of times there are students who doesn't have the cash to buy new cloths all the time and by using one and the same uniform then it will stop bullying based on the cloths someone may ot may not wear.

However on the other side everyone loses their personality if they wear the same type of cloths. I personally am for uniforms since it's a preperation for some jobs that may have a dress code, besides school uniforms are hot lol
27270 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M
Offline
Posted 1/15/16 , edited 1/15/16
For people to get used to uniforms and dress codes, they have to grow up with them.

It doesn't make sense to start implementing this in high school, since that obviously wouldn't work. I'm talking about getting kids to wear uniforms for 12 years, starting from kindergarten. Although it's right to say that uniforms/dress codes do not lead directly to greater work ethic, I am of the opinion that it certainly helps. I'm talking about raising them to have a certain mindset, not to suddenly throw them into it by forcing them to wear an outfit. After 12 years of getting dressed a certain way in order to go to school, it should feel natural, like something that ought to be done. This is the kind of discipline I'm talking about. To go to school, you first wear the uniform. To go to work, you first put on your work attire. It's, first and foremost, about the task at hand rather than about how you should express yourself.

Imagine going to a dojo where kids wear whatever they want instead of a gi. Or going to a military boot camp where people wear whatever they feel like. Uniforms/dress codes create an air of purpose and solidarity that you don't get if everyone in a group is dressed differently. Appearance isn't everything, but it matters. Training people to put on a uniform every time they do something helps create a certain "mode" that they switch on when they go about doing that thing. The focus shifts from carefree individuality to something more serious.

I don't think uniforms are demeaning or impractical. Quite the opposite, actually. When I wear my uniforms and head out to get stuff done, I feel like I belong there and that I have a purpose. It's easier to take it easy and act casually when you dress casually. And a sensible dress code accounts for the temperature and classroom conditions, so comfort is of little issue.

I'll use martial arts as an example since that's what I have the most experience with. 8 years of having to put on your gi and belt and bow before heading into the dojo. You're there to learn the moves, just like how you go to school for academics. Sure, you can make friends and get along with your fellow practitioners, but that's not your reason for being there. Nobody wears a belt they aren't supposed to, and anyone below the level of purple belt wears a white gi. You listen to the instructor, do as you're told, and practice over and over to learn the moves. Afterward, you can remove your gi and you can be yourself after class. During class, though, there's really no purpose in trying to express yourself unless it's through your expression of the topic at hand. It's distracting and should not be encouraged.

There were a few classes before which the instructor told us NOT to wear our uniforms and to go in with our street clothes. He did this to make a point about discipline and how different class feels without the uniforms. It was far easier to be casual and it was harder to focus on learning even though nobody was talking about clothes.
11632 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
40 / M / USA
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
Meh. Don't care either way. Though if it ever gets enforced everywhere let's make it like anime...
4487 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / Virginia, USA
Offline
Posted 1/15/16
Don't care either way, I wore a uniform all through elementary school and jr high and didn't mind it but I did perfer being able to wear whatever I wanted in high school.
5974 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M / Terra Australis (...
Offline
Posted 1/15/16

For people to get used to uniforms and dress codes, they have to grow up with them.

It doesn't make sense to start implementing this in high school, since that obviously wouldn't work. I'm talking about getting kids to wear uniforms for 12 years, starting from kindergarten. Although it's right to say that uniforms/dress codes do not lead directly to greater work ethic, I am of the opinion that it certainly helps. I'm talking about raising them to have a certain mindset, not to suddenly throw them into it by forcing them to wear an outfit. After 12 years of getting dressed a certain way in order to go to school, it should feel natural, like something that ought to be done. This is the kind of discipline I'm talking about. To go to school, you first wear the uniform. To go to work, you first put on your work attire. It's, first and foremost, about the task at hand rather than about how you should express yourself.

Imagine going to a dojo where kids wear whatever they want instead of a gi. Or going to a military boot camp where people wear whatever they feel like. Uniforms/dress codes create an air of purpose and solidarity that you don't get if everyone in a group is dressed differently. Appearance isn't everything, but it matters. Training people to put on a uniform every time they do something helps create a certain "mode" that they switch on when they go about doing that thing. The focus shifts from carefree individuality to something more serious.

I don't think uniforms are demeaning or impractical. Quite the opposite, actually. When I wear my uniforms and head out to get stuff done, I feel like I belong there and that I have a purpose. It's easier to take it easy and act casually when you dress casually. And a sensible dress code accounts for the temperature and classroom conditions, so comfort is of little issue.

I'll use martial arts as an example since that's what I have the most experience with. 8 years of having to put on your gi and belt and bow before heading into the dojo. You're there to learn the moves, just like how you go to school for academics. Sure, you can make friends and get along with your fellow practitioners, but that's not your reason for being there. Nobody wears a belt they aren't supposed to, and anyone below the level of purple belt wears a white gi. You listen to the instructor, do as you're told, and practice over and over to learn the moves. Afterward, you can remove your gi and you can be yourself after class. During class, though, there's really no purpose in trying to express yourself unless it's through your expression of the topic at hand. It's distracting and should not be encouraged.

There were a few classes before which the instructor told us NOT to wear our uniforms and to go in with our street clothes. He did this to make a point about discipline and how different class feels without the uniforms. It was far easier to be casual and it was harder to focus on learning even though nobody was talking about clothes.


That simply because you were comfortable being raised in a conformist environment. The Uniform isn't really a major contribution to discipline, and I know this has been seen time and time again.And the fact that you believe people shouldn't be able to express themselves in some way shows this. And the other examples you use are optional, which while I have a minor problem with, it isn't really the problem. The problem is forcing a MANDATORY UNIFORM ON OTHER HUMAN BEINGS BECAUSE OF A SUBJECTIVE FEELING.

And the example you used......have objective uses. School uniforms DO NOT. This is the problem. A Martial Arts uniform is for showing ranks and allowing movement. Military Uniform clearly has protection benefits and the ability to carry objects like water bottles.

A school uniform doesn't have that.
17663 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Hoosierville
Offline
Posted 1/15/16 , edited 1/15/16
All will wear the same! All will think the same! All will march the same! All will be the same!



Unity will give us Strength!






No uniforms ever.
27270 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M
Offline
Posted 1/15/16 , edited 1/15/16

CreatorTheta wrote:

That simply because you were comfortable being raised in a conformist environment. The Uniform isn't really a major contribution to discipline, and I know this has been seen time and time again.And the fact that you believe people shouldn't be able to express themselves in some way shows this. And the other examples you use are optional, which while I have a minor problem with, it isn't really the problem. The problem is forcing a MANDATORY UNIFORM ON OTHER HUMAN BEINGS BECAUSE OF A SUBJECTIVE FEELING.

And the example you used......have objective uses. School uniforms DO NOT. This is the problem. A Martial Arts uniform is for showing ranks and allowing movement. Military Uniform clearly has protection benefits and the ability to carry objects like water bottles.

A school uniform doesn't have that.


The problem is a focus on expression when there should be a focus on learning and discipline. A uniform doesn't bar a person from expressing himself/herself, it merely prevents that type of expression through clothing. This means the person has all kinds of other methods of expression. The fact that people are having an issue with looking the same yet are saying appearances do not matter doesn't mesh. I think appearances do matter. It is just that school is not the time to be worrying about how to look better. If everyone looks the same, the energy that is spent worrying about appearances can be diverted elsewhere. Everyone is equal appearance-wise in a situation where appearance should not be a main focus. Not a problem in my book.

I expressed myself through my artwork and my writing while in school. This, to me, is infinitely more meaningful than expressing myself by wearing a certain shirt or certain accessories. Just as a soldier can distinguish himself in battle and a martial artist has a distinctive style and an office worker excels at certain tasks, these differences should be what matter when doing a certain job. Being a student should be treated like a job. School is not a place to relax, so measures must be taken to make this very clear.

I'm aware my comparisons are not perfect, but I believe they're still very relevant. Our black gis were weighted. They were not designed for the easiest movement; they were designed to be somewhat restrictive. Higher-ranked students wore heavier gis as part of training. Uniforms and dress codes are followed as a part of training. Uniforms give a sense of belonging. As nice as it is to be an individual, it's simply more effective to be part of a group when doing certain things. Learning basic skills is one of those things. If you wish to express your individuality in meaningful ways, you must give up individuality in ways that don't matter.

Individuality is not a bad thing. But you can't have it all the time. Its priority changes depending on the situation. In a setting where there are many people together for one purpose, the effort should be put toward that purpose, not the individual's whims and wishes. This is why going on about individuality in the company workplace gets you laughed at. School needs to be treated the same way. The people in the US take education far too lightly. That's why the US is 28th in the world.
20452 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 1/15/16

Morbidhanson wrote:
I'm of the opinion that schools are places dedicated to learning and that early discipline sets kids up to be responsible and efficient adults in the workplace. Uniforms/dress codes also take the guesswork out of the morning routine. You get dressed, eat breakfast, and go.

The opposition thinks uniforms stifle creativity and don't allow the expression of individuality. I don't think creativity is stifled by uniforms at all, and individuality may be expressed through more meaningful ways than dress. To me, school isn't the place to be focusing on unique clothing, anyway. School is where you go to learn and follow rules. School should be treated like work or like a military camp.


Very true. No need for me to say more
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.