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Is college a good option in this scenario?
Posted 1/14/16
So this is all hypothetical

And I'm sure there are forums of this but oh well.

So I've seen forums of question if college is a good option but the answers vary.

So If you had a person who didn't care all that much for an education and basically accepts a job that pays money would it really be worth the time?

Or would it just be a waste?

I'm curious
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28 / M / Finland
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Posted 1/14/16 , edited 1/14/16
I'm not sure how the career ladder works in -Add your country here-, but I would have assumed attending college will get you somewhere in life. Dropping out / not attending would probably close a lot of doors to future opportunities.

If I was said person, I'd probably sit down and think things a bit more carefully. i.e. If I desire a potential dead end job for the rest of my existence.

Edit: Not to mention the college degree would help should you move abroad.

An example: Moving to Finland with no family ties, but with an education is tough to get working visa / permission to reside.. Moving to Finland with no family ties and no vocational education, absolutely no chance. >< (Even for EU state members)
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Posted 1/14/16 , edited 1/15/16
Well, it depends. How much money?
See, some people can not go to college, or not get a proper degree, and end up striking luck (that happened to my uncle, who doesn't have a formal degree, but he formed an entertainment company w/ his friends and now helps manage a successful music festival venue), but others just end up shoving themselves further down the crapper. You used to be able to get somewhere in the world without a fancy degree or college diploma, but nowadays some employers won't bat an eye at you unless you WORK to get to higher positions, or you HAVE at least an associates/bachelors to show for yourself. The attitude towards college has changed significantly in the last 30some years, for a lot of people it's viewed as a "must" now and societally and in employment it's reflected. It's like, after getting my damn GED, I'll basically have no choice BUT to go to college due to the fact that societally I'm viewed as being a lazy prick already, and the only way TO disprove this and not end up with a lower paying job– because I have few good ideas for any kind of entrepreneurship– is to go to college, even if it's just a community and not a university, even though I fear I will fail miserably there. I feel like the pressure has been kind of thrust upon my back to do whatever everyone considers to be "better", than to try forging my own riskier path. It's not gonna be worth it to do the latter, I imagine. I just have a bitter attitude towards schoolwork in general, because it's always mentally frustrated me. By no means am I dumb, but I'm not always very functional, even though I'm trying to do everything in my power to get to a "normal" level.
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Posted 1/14/16 , edited 1/14/16
Depends what you consider worthwhile. And you should consider costs (time and money) as well. Ideally, it's best to go to college if you can get grants and scholarships rather than paying out of your own pocket. Also, four years is a long time. It usually takes four years unless you're extremely motivated.

Most people consider college an investment or, at least, something they can put on resumes to look good. But it's not unheard of for people who don't really care about money to go for the experience and for more learning.
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Posted 1/14/16

SylveonLuna wrote:

So this is all hypothetical

And I'm sure there are forums of this but oh well.

So I've seen forums of question if college is a good option but the answers vary.

So If you had a person who didn't care all that much for an education and basically accepts a job that pays money would it really be worth the time?

Or would it just be a waste?

I'm curious


One a purely economic level College will fuck you over short term but in the long term youll make more money in the end. If you purely want cash go to a trade school and pick up Plumbing or electrical repair.
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30 / M / U.S.
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Posted 1/14/16
I think it is best if you go to college when you have a clear, realistic goal in mind. I'm a non-traditional student, so my advice may differ from what others will give. When I took some classes recently, I got a chance to chat with a number of students. Most of them didn't seem to know why they were in college or what they wanted to do. There was a ton of "well, I'm here and we'll see what happens". One guy I chatted with confessed that he actually wanted to go for engineering, but said he'd stay there for a couple of years (at a school with no engineering courses) and then think about transferring. He had no idea where he wanted to be or what he wanted to do, and was all the while wasting away precious financial aid and incurring debt.

If you really think any old job will be fine for you, go out and try that for a couple of years. If you change your mind, college will still be waiting and you'll have incurred no debt and wasted no financial aid. There are many paths to education: learning a trade; going to a community college, if all you'll need is an Associate Degree or if you just want to take your generals at lower cost; and a full-fledged 4 year school if that's what you need.
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23 / M / The Cosmos
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Posted 1/14/16
College is always a good option. A friend's father of a friend that I met during senior year of high school threw a going away party for his son at their home....that just happened to be a 17-room mansion. Where was he going? Harvard Law School. His father was a neurosurgeon and his mom was like the co producer of soul train or something like that [irrelevant info though]

anyway, after the party was over me and a few other friends stayed to help clean up and give our final farewells. before we left his father pulled a couple of us aside and had a chat with us. Asked us about our future and all that. He told us to not focus on getting a job, focus on going and succeeding in school and everything else will fall into place. Of course, being the naive broke-asses we were, we were like "nah man, we don't come from wealthy homes like this, we need money for this and that." Fast forward a couple of years I'm at a shitty job that just "pays money" wishing I would have stayed in school, gotten some sort of certification that could help me get an even better job. (im going back this semester but still, I'm so far behind. I would have been somewhere better by now)

Even if you don't care about getting an education don't make it about getting an education, make it about being able to earn more money. I don't know, Find a way to make college worth it because it definitely is.
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41 / M / USA
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Posted 1/14/16
All depends on how much of a life you want to make for yourself (and what you're capable of).
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21 / F / USA
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Posted 1/14/16
I don't think college would be right in that attitude. It is a lot of hard work and is expensive and getting even more so. So unless you have a clear objective in mind and are motivated to reach said goal, it would probably be just a waste of time.

As someone mentioned, a trade school would probably be best. Or perhaps a community college.
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Posted 1/14/16
I still think college is fine. More opportunity is good. Technically you still can choose a fast food job even with a college degree. What you need to do is find something you want to do and get a degree pointed towards that. Lethargy towards college is probably because you haven't found anything interesting.
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29 / M / Oklahoma
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Posted 1/14/16
"It depends".

You can make a lot of money with the right degree and acronyms. You can also have a boat anchor strapped around your neck working at a Starbucks if you select the wrong one.

Equally, you really need to live smart. Stay the hell out of dorms and live at home, go local, hit a community college to get every basic curriculum requirement for the big boys out of the way first. Trust me, I'd be a hell of a lot better off had I started this way. You'll also have more time to figure out what you're really wanting to do, though if it's money it's likely STEM.

Other options of course are trade schools, they are faster routes with quicker payout but they have some drawbacks. Lots of welders start hurting when they get older for example and just have a harder time, but the ROI is pretty solid for an education.

Personally I have a BT in ISA.
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Posted 1/14/16

SylveonLuna wrote:

So this is all hypothetical

And I'm sure there are forums of this but oh well.

So I've seen forums of question if college is a good option but the answers vary.

So If you had a person who didn't care all that much for an education and basically accepts a job that pays money would it really be worth the time?

Or would it just be a waste?

I'm curious


Tbh, I went into college with the mindset, "I'm not here to get a degree so i can get a job, I'm here to learn cuz i want to learn anything." And that's pretty much true. Knowledge is an interest of mine.

I want to say that people who don't give af about learning, and go to college just to increase their income potential, that they really shouldn't go to college. But, in our modern society, that's not really a viable option since a survivable income is starting to require college. That's got its own merits, aka, people are forced to increase their knowledge, and the average national IQ will be raised by force. But, idk, it also infringes on personal rights and lowers average happiness levels.

But, in the end, whether you like math or not, if someone forced you to learn how to solve differential equations despite you hating math... in the end you'll know how to do them whether you like to do them or not. And that's all that matters i guess. At least the bone heads will be educated -- no harm in that.

So for your friend, it's up to him. If he's able to find a job that isn't a dead end and has potential for increased salaries as time goes on, then he should do that. It's better to be happy than spend 4 years in college being miserable.
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Posted 1/14/16 , edited 1/14/16

SylveonLuna wrote:

So this is all hypothetical

And I'm sure there are forums of this but oh well.

So I've seen forums of question if college is a good option but the answers vary.

So If you had a person who didn't care all that much for an education and basically accepts a job that pays money would it really be worth the time?

Or would it just be a waste?

I'm curious

A person without motivation is going to fail, with or without an education.

Posted 1/14/16
Anther route is becoming a journeyman/tradesman. This requires an apprenticeship. You still need the motivation to take the time and education that comes to getting it. At least you are not in a classroom or lecture hall getting it.
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Posted 1/15/16

SylveonLuna wrote:

So If you had a person who didn't care all that much for an education and basically accepts a job that pays money would it really be worth the time?

Or would it just be a waste?

I'm curious


You didn't mention if the job they accepted was a full time job or a part time job, nor did you mention if it is a minimum wage or higher wage job or what benefits it may have, or if there is room for advancement or training on the job.

I worked part time and helped my parents pay for college, so the idea of working while you're in school isn't alien to me. My ex husband also worked part time when he was in medical school to help cover some of the bills - those medical textbooks can cost up to $800 apiece.

I have several cousins all of whom finished high school and two of whom are attending community college part time earning the basic credits while working part time (one apprenticed to a plumber). They live at home and each has a car to get to school and work. Right now they haven't totally made up their minds but they don't really have to as long as they're just earning the basic core credits.

My other two cousins dropped out after high school to work. One has been fired from dozens of jobs - McDonalds fired him for yelling at a customer because the register had no button for "no bun" on their burger. UPS fired him for throwing packages around. I don't think he's been able to hold a job for more than 6 months at a time because he gets into confrontations with authority figures just the way his dad used to. He's living in his girlfriend's apartment from what I hear lately, and I wonder how long that will last.

The other ran away to Wisconsin with her boyfriend because her mom had saved up enough for her to go to college but said that she couldn't move her boyfriend into her mom's house. So they initially moved in with her grandfather in Wisconsin - only to discover there were strings attached that they didn't like, and they got an apartment of their own. He was working at a junk yard pulling parts and she was working at Wal-mart and Target. Then he had an accident - slid off the road and broke his spine and had a zillion screws and things put in it - temporarily paralyzed and had to re-learn how to walk. She had to help him move if he had to go bathroom and stuff like that plus her salary plus his disability wasn't enough to pay the rent or the continuing medical bills. Then she found out he was cheating on her when she was at work. She came back to her mom's place and is working full time for a loan company processing paperwork now. Her mom would send her to college if she wanted to go but so far she's currently satisfied to live with her mom instead of trying to get her own place.

Friends of mine who finished associates degrees or certificates have done all right as long as the associates was in something where there are jobs like nursing. You can earn a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) in 2 years and then start working while you earn your Registered Nurse (RN) degree. Nurses make pretty good money but have to work long shifts.
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