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Post Reply Buying CD's and DVD's... ermm... I mean Blu-rays
Posted 1/15/16
I buy blu rays, but only when the price isn't too high.
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38 / M / Kansas
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Posted 1/16/16
I thought I was going to give up physical media awhile back. So, when money was tight, I went ahead and sold my Azumanga Daioh DVD set. My rationale was I'd just buy a digital copy.
Only, there isn't one. Not on any subscription site, not for digital purchase either. So now, when I have the urge to watch it, I cannot.
Another favorite series of mine is My Ordinary Life. Never did buy it, then one day, Crunchyroll removed it. Not available digitally elsewhere, and Amazon lists the DVDs as unavailable as well.
Moral of the story: if you really love any piece of media, buy a physical copy and don't let go of it.
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22 / M / Fraxinus
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Posted 1/16/16
I've bought music digitally, and I've bought music physically, and I can safely say that I much prefer the latter. I don't like not physically having it. I know it's irrational, but I don't feel like I really own something unless I physically have it. Same goes with games.

As for anime blu-rays, I'm not made of money, so I'll just continue to stream them. I might buy the physical copy of the source manga or game of an anime, but not the anime itself... I might end up buying the physical copies of my favourite anime some time, eventually, but right now, with my... limited expenses, I can put it off for now.

So basically, with the assumption that money isn't an issue, I much prefer physical media.
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Posted 1/16/16 , edited 1/16/16
I would only buy anime/movies/TV shows DVD's if I could handle watching it plenty of times, if so, then why not.
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Posted 1/16/16
Only the serieses that I want to support, even if there is no chance of another season. I like seeing them as a memento of the stuff I watched, hell I still rewatch all of them! And as it was pointed out earlier, if whoever sold them stopped selling them I'll still have them.
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20 / M / Sweden
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Posted 1/16/16
I like to own something and I like to support the people who make the entertainment I watch/read. So for me I don't think it's that much to pay to own
Werina 
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Posted 1/16/16
i prefer owning it.

if i want it i buy it
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19 / M / England
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Posted 1/16/16
support the official release yo
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27 / M / Texas
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Posted 1/16/16
Hell, I still collect VHS tapes.
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34 / F / In a van down by...
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Posted 1/16/16
I am the type of person you will hate, because I buy digital copies of series and movies....

However, for movies and series that I do really love, I will buy the physical release. Gotta amp up my collection.


I also stream more than anything. Just cheaper. And I'd rather buy manga/books/figures.


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22 / M / Baltimore, Maryland
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Posted 1/16/16
For games, I tend to buy digitally just to save the convenience of not having to get up and switch discs. For anime, I tend to only buy series I STRONGLY adore, ones that I'd probably rate an 8+/10. I only own maybe like 10 series if that. Manga, however, I tend to own a lot of just because nothing beats being able to physically flip through the pages.
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Posted 1/16/16 , edited 1/16/16

Ejanss wrote:

"All Your Movies, Forever[tm]" is not just a lie by the digital companies. It's THREE lies.

You won't find them All.
They won't be Yours.
And as such, you won't get to keep them Forever.


cleruninja wrote:

I thought I was going to give up physical media awhile back. So, when money was tight, I went ahead and sold my Azumanga Daioh DVD set. My rationale was I'd just buy a digital copy.
Only, there isn't one. Not on any subscription site, not for digital purchase either. So now, when I have the urge to watch it, I cannot.
Another favorite series of mine is My Ordinary Life. Never did buy it, then one day, Crunchyroll removed it. Not available digitally elsewhere, and Amazon lists the DVDs as unavailable as well.
Moral of the story: if you really love any piece of media, buy a physical copy and don't let go of it.


I remember when Disney suddenly "decided" they weren't going to release any more Studio Ghibli movies in the US after no one went to see Princess Mononoke in theaters.
While the niche of hardcore tech-cracker fans were saying "Fine, who needs US disks anyway, I'm buying German!", most of us who had gotten bootleg VHS fansubs of Nausicaa or Totoro were now holding onto them like bars of uranium.
We were now the Knights Templar of Anime, holding on to our physical copies to preserve them for future generations, in case they disappeared anywhere else in the world.

There's two big problems with thinking that "Digital will take over movies!" they way they did with CD's, books and games:
1) Books, games, and movie rentals are one-use items, and physical copies are at a disadvantage--They create "disposed" copies that either clutter up your space or have to be resold. (As most found out when the bottom pretty much dropped out of the "Sell your old DVD to Amazon" market. ) And as Rujikin points out, MP3 has turned the music industry into selling songs rather than albums, and one or two songs was what most of us bought even in the CD days.
Anything you hoard long enough to use again has to be handy, and within reach--Like Mark Twain said, keep all your eggs in one basket, and watch that basket.

2) It may be a generational difference that the last two generations has had the movie-saturation of four premium cable channels, and Blockbuster DVD rentals, everywhere, and can't conceive that movies will ever "disappear"--Just turn on HBO, or dial up Netflix, they'll be there. Well, guess what: Now studios don't want to send their movies to premium cable or subscription services anymore, cable and streaming are now more interested in showing us their own dark, dreary humorless shows, and if you want to see any movie, the VOD companies are more interested in selling it to you than renting it to you.
And since broadcast TV hasn't been showing free movies for the last decade or two, the market is slowly being cornered. Are you happy with a monopoly? I'm not.

(Probably because I remember the old days when the biggest movies showed on ABC Sunday night, and if all the other kids in class had caught the James Bond movie last night and you hadn't, you were screwed. If you hoped and were lucky, maybe it would show up again in a year or two, and you checked TV Guide every week to see what did.
When VHS came along, to our now more adult selves, a video fan's shelf was his CASTLE.)
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Posted 1/16/16

Ejanss wrote:


Ejanss wrote:

"All Your Movies, Forever[tm]" is not just a lie by the digital companies. It's THREE lies.

You won't find them All.
They won't be Yours.
And as such, you won't get to keep them Forever.


cleruninja wrote:

I thought I was going to give up physical media awhile back. So, when money was tight, I went ahead and sold my Azumanga Daioh DVD set. My rationale was I'd just buy a digital copy.
Only, there isn't one. Not on any subscription site, not for digital purchase either. So now, when I have the urge to watch it, I cannot.
Another favorite series of mine is My Ordinary Life. Never did buy it, then one day, Crunchyroll removed it. Not available digitally elsewhere, and Amazon lists the DVDs as unavailable as well.
Moral of the story: if you really love any piece of media, buy a physical copy and don't let go of it.


I remember when Disney suddenly "decided" they weren't going to release any more Studio Ghibli movies in the US after no one went to see Princess Mononoke in theaters.
While the niche of hardcore tech-cracker fans were saying "Fine, who needs US disks anyway, I'm buying German!", most of us who had gotten bootleg VHS fansubs of Nausicaa or Totoro were now holding onto them like bars of uranium.
We were now the Knights Templar of Anime, holding on to our physical copies to preserve them for future generations, in case they disappeared anywhere else in the world.

There's two big problems with thinking that "Digital will take over movies!" they way they did with CD's, books and games:
1) Books, games, and movie rentals are one-use items, and physical copies are at a disadvantage--They create "disposed" copies that either clutter up your space or have to be resold. (As most found out when the bottom pretty much dropped out of the "Sell your old DVD to Amazon" market. )
Anything you hoard long enough to use again has to be handy, and within reach--Like Mark Twain said, keep all your eggs in one basket, and watch that basket.

2) It may be a generational difference that the last two generations has had the movie-saturation of four premium cable channels, and Blockbuster DVD rentals, everywhere, and can't conceive that movies will ever "disappear"--Just turn on HBO, or dial up Netflix, they'll be there. Well, guess what: Now studios don't want to send their movies to premium cable or subscription services anymore, cable and streaming are now more interested in showing us their own dark, dreary humorless shows, and if you want to see any movie, the VOD companies are more interested in selling it to you than renting it to you.
And since broadcast TV hasn't been showing free movies for the last decade or two, the market is slowly being cornered. Are you happy with a monopoly? I'm not.

(Probably because I remember the old days when the biggest movies showed on ABC Sunday night, and if all the other kids in class had caught the James Bond movie last night and you hadn't, you were screwed. If you hoped and were lucky, maybe it would show up again in a year or two, and you checked TV Guide every week to see what did.
When VHS came along, to our now more adult selves, a video fan's shelf was his CASTLE.)



Are you an old?


If I bought physical copies of everything I liked though, I'd be on Hoarders.
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Posted 1/16/16 , edited 1/16/16

Nogara-san wrote:


Ejanss wrote:
2) It may be a generational difference that the last two generations has had the movie-saturation of four premium cable channels, and Blockbuster DVD rentals, everywhere, and can't conceive that movies will ever "disappear"--Just turn on HBO, or dial up Netflix, they'll be there. Well, guess what:

(Probably because I remember the old days when the biggest movies showed on ABC Sunday night, and if all the other kids in class had caught the James Bond movie last night and you hadn't, you were screwed. If you hoped and were lucky, maybe it would show up again in a year or two, and you checked TV Guide every week to see what did.
When VHS came along, to our now more adult selves, a video fan's shelf was his CASTLE.)


Are you an old?


I'm older than 33, if that's what you mean.

("Ehh, you kids--I remember when you could only watch ONE episode of a TV series every week!")
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Posted 1/16/16

theYchromosome wrote:

In 10 years (or whenever), when the license expires and Kyousougiga has lost what little fanbase it has, and re-licensing costs more than it makes, how will I watch it unless I have a physical copy? When Bandai went under, we lost things like Haruhi Suzumiya and Code Geass (I've heard Funi re-licensed Geass for NA, but that was a while ago, and I see no plans to bring it out). If I didn't have those on DVD, I wouldn't be able to watch them, short of learning Japanese and shipping over the un-subbed versions.

If a company goes under, you're screwed. Even if a company doesn't go under, if a license for an obscure show expires, it may not be worth the company's money to extend it -- regardless of whether it's your favorite show ever. If it's a show I really like, I want to make sure I can watch it when I want, so I buy physical copies. If I wouldn't mind never seeing a show again in my life, I don't bother.

Music has similar reasons, but you can usually download music straight to hard drive, so the above reasons are not as salient. Usually, however, I still buy CD's mostly because I can get better sound quality ripping from CD than I can downloading, although FLAC for download is becoming more widely available, which is nice.


This. I remember doing a lot of net dungeoning to find a certain anime that I couldn't find on torrents or any streaming service. I was lucky enough someone on a random blog posted his google drive share and got it.
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