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Post Reply Why don't women like science?
runec 
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Posted 1/16/16 , edited 1/16/16
Well, I'm glad an anonymous internet commentator declared we fixed all the issues facing women in STEM fields! I guess we can all go home now. Sexism is over everyone! Good work.

Have you tried asking, you know, Google? Instead of mansplaining on a random forum on an anime website?





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Posted 1/16/16 , edited 1/16/16

PrinceJudar wrote:


Jackalope82 wrote:

I fail to see how evolution applies to hard work.


Well that's the thing now isn't it? It is related. People make the argument that we are set in stone--because of 'biology' we simply cannot go beyond limitations. However, that's exactly what evolution is.

That's why his argument had been so profoundly faulty. Exceptions, breaking limits, progressing is exactly what humans are made of. Hard work is exactly what has put us into places we never would have dreamed of otherwise.

You can't go to outer space!
Well, fuck it, we did it anyway.



Okay, that was my misunderstanding. Thank you for the clarification.
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Posted 1/16/16 , edited 1/16/16

runec wrote:
mansplaining






Kill me now.
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Posted 1/16/16
I think that women are interested in science, they just might not be pursuing it as their top career choice. Personally, I love science, but I enjoy my interest in interior design more, so that is what I am pursuing. If I hadn't found ID, I imagine I would have been in a STEM career. However, part of the reason I chose the career I did has to do with wanting to have children in the future. I think this is something that most women take into account when they are looking into what field to pursue. In a STEM field, we would need to think about the viability of taking time off to raise children, and what the implications would be on our career. I think that childbirth, as such, plays a large role in why more women do not pursue STEM field jobs. I know that being able to take that time off is one of the major reasons why I went with ID over architecture or engineering.
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Posted 1/16/16
I remember reading a study about how men are more likely to do more dangerous jobs then women. Not saying this particular field is dangerous. I'm just starting to think that men or women gravitate towards different jobs as a gender more often then the other. Not to say there aren't any men or women in jobs that are dominated by a particular gender, its just the gender disparity is there.
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Posted 1/16/16
I was under the impression woman liked science more than men.
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Posted 1/16/16

PrinceJudar wrote:


Jackalope82 wrote:

I fail to see how evolution applies to hard work.


Well that's the thing now isn't it? It is related. People make the argument that we are set in stone--because of 'biology' we simply cannot go beyond limitations. However, that's exactly what evolution is.

That's why his argument had been so profoundly faulty. Exceptions, breaking limits, progressing is exactly what humans are made of. Hard work is exactly what has put us into places we never would have dreamed of otherwise.

You can't go to outer space!
Well, fuck it, we did it anyway.


That isn't to say that evolution and biology don't have an impact on an individual's life. Evolutionary Psychology and similar fields which look at how humans have evolved and why are often used to speak about trends in a population, not to say the same applies to everyone, as there is obviously a lot of variety between individuals.

For an example of how this works, women and men do have very real differences in brain structure and wiring, which leads to different forms of problem solving and different methods of interacting. These differences potentially explain why women tend to be more empathetic and men tend to be more logical. Further, this in some part explains why trends exist in career choice. An individual who solves problems with, and excels at utilizing empathy would be more likely to choose a career where that would be important such as Teaching or Social work (both female dominated fields), where an individual who tends to think and solve problems logically would be more likely to go into a field such as Engineering or Chemistry (both male dominated fields).
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Posted 1/16/16

sundin13 wrote:


Evolutionary study is how yesterday led to today--not how today yields tomorrow. Many unfortunately abuse it for the latter.



Heyyyy mate
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Posted 1/16/16


Spatial reasoning is a big player in engineering. It's one of the few splits in men's vs women's brains that's been studied.
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Posted 1/16/16

Asosialt wrote:

It's not enough to remove educational, financial etc. barriers that may have held women back in the past. It's the attitudes and the avenues that must change as well. Not only is it possible that there is a lingering social stigma for women to be in STEM but there could be other factors that are preventing them pursuing a particular career that have yet to be discovered.

Whatever the issue is, I highly doubt it is biological. Even if you are inclined to believe that most women are soft and cuddly nurture-bots, no amount of evidence will show that a stoic and stereotypical masculine disposition is more inclined to be innately better at STEM subjects. I think we can all agree that despite the freedom of choice we all have, we are still strongly encouraged to go down certain paths based on things like gender, age, race, and class.

The changes you speak of need time to actually take effect before we can give answers that aren't based on speculation and bias.


Tbh, women are more artsy-minded biologically. I forget if it's the left/right hemisphere that controls the creative w/e versus logical w/e.

But in my college, the arts fields were teeming with girls and less of men.

I was a science major, and since bio majors are the easiest physical science major with a lot more visuals and "artsy" stuff, there were a greater % of females there. As you progressed into the more mathematical/computational/logical/analytical fields like Chemistry and Physics, there were fewer girls present. You could see the trend in our professors as well, almost all the bio profs were female, then there were only like 1 or 2 (nope 1) female chem prof, and 0 female physics profs.

That's why there's lots of scholarships for girl chem majors, and not as much for girl bio majors.
Werina 
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Posted 1/16/16
science is fun
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Posted 1/16/16
Does Jane Goodall not count? Or Nicole Duplaix? Or Fiona Sunquist?
Posted 1/16/16

sphase wrote:

They do like science, they just tend to not like engineering


I agree.
runec 
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Posted 1/16/16 , edited 1/16/16

lambofgenesis wrote:
Tbh, women are more artsy-minded biologically. I forget if it's the left/right hemisphere that controls the creative w/e versus logical w/e.


You know the whole left brain / right brain thing is bullshit right? Its just an enduring myth. There are very few actual differences between the male and female brain. And what differences there are, are not actually gender exclusive. Merely more common in one gender or another. The vast majority of people have characteristics of both the "male" and "female" brain. Many of these characteristics are also strongly influenced by enviroment, not biological sex. IE to some degree the imposed gender role becomes a self fulfilling prophecy.



MeImportaTresCojones wrote:
Spatial reasoning is a big player in engineering. It's one of the few splits in men's vs women's brains that's been studied.


The differences between men and women's brains has been studied extensively. Basically from the moment we could study someone's brain without having to kill them first. >.>

But spatial skills are not biological skills. Anyone can develop spatial skills and do so rather easily. While yes, the average male does perform a little better at spatial visualization, the average woman actually performs better at spatial memory. Also, the male advantage in spatial visualization only appears when the task is conducted under a time limit. When there is no time limit, women perform equally as well.

So no, the problems in STEM are not stemming ( har ) from any sort of biological difference. They're stemming ( har! ) from good ol' fashion sexism. Girls are less likely to be encouraged towards mathematics and sciences in high school, women are less likely to be promoted in the workplace and STEM fields, like everything else, have a significant wage gap between genders.

As for why do we want more women in STEM, even if you put aside equality and focus on it pragmatically: Money. More STEM = more high paying jobs = more sweet sweet revenue.


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Posted 1/17/16 , edited 1/18/16
Looking at it from a more general point of view, sometimes the reason is nothing more than how some people find certain things boring. Maybe there are just more women who don't find STEM fields particularly entertaining or fulfilling and it's as simple as that. I was studying Computer Science and have been working in that field for the past 4 years, only to learn I despise it and switch over into studying art. People have different tastes, so maybe more women than men just don't take a liking to STEM fields. Nothing wrong with that, everyone has different tastes.
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