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Posted 1/19/16
No reason to upgrade to 10 unless you're a gamer who gives no fucks about the drawbacks. 10 has a lot of good stuff and performance. That can't be denied, but it has its cons as well.

With my rig though I don't need to update to 10. DX12 is nice and all but with my specs I don't give a shit lol.
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Posted 1/19/16
I'll get windows 10 when I get a new computer. I'm happy with window 7 for right now. No reason to fix something that isn't broken.
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Posted 1/19/16

sarteck wrote:
I honestly don't get why more people don't switch (at least partially) to Linux.
Dunno who is "closest" to windows but was it linux that is quite close or not?

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Posted 1/19/16 , edited 1/19/16

Freddy96NO wrote:


sarteck wrote:
I honestly don't get why more people don't switch (at least partially) to Linux.
Dunno who is "closest" to windows but was it linux that is quite close or not?



Linux mint is close in terms of the user interface http://www.linuxmint.com/



Though the OS is quite different but its kind of nice. It's free, comes with most of the software you will use, comes with a built in firewall, almost never gets viruses (viruses need your password to execute and need to be marked as allowed to execute). https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Antivirus

There is TONS of free software you can download for it too and its in a setup similar to google play store, minus having to pay for anything.
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Posted 1/19/16

Ryulightorb wrote:

There's just no way I would put up with that. I can't have MS looking over my shoulder while I use my computer. It seems that Windows 7 will end up being the very last MS product I ever buy.

“They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.”

I don't do anything illegal either; doesn't mean I condone what Microsoft is doing with win10.
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Posted 1/19/16 , edited 1/19/16

DeadlyOats wrote:

Now that Intel and AMD will be making new CPU's and Chipsets that won't support Windows 7, I can see that I will also stop building new machines. I won't be a PC gamer anymore... I'll have to go to console gaming.....


There hasn't been a need to build a new gaming PC for the last couple of processor generations... Loads of people on gaming forums are still running Sandy Bridge (and Sandy Bridge can clock way higher than some of the later chips, and I haven't even had to OC it yet)

I also only have a GTX 770, which runs all of my games perfectly fine. The last upgrade was an SSD and that was it.

I still have a Core 2 Extreme build running from I don't even remember which year.......... These suckers last practically forever if you don't abuse them very much.
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Posted 1/19/16

Freddy96NO wrote:


sarteck wrote:
I honestly don't get why more people don't switch (at least partially) to Linux.
Dunno who is "closest" to windows but was it linux that is quite close or not?



Hmmm... How to put this...

You probably already know, but Linux has many different "flavors," and some tend to be very user friendly, some tend to be a little harder to use (but easier to make into what you want).

The most Windows-like flavor would probably be Mint, followed closely by Ubuntu. Those are the two I would recommend as desktops for any new users, simply because it'll be easier to use than many others. Plus, Mint (and a version of Ubuntu called Xubuntu) takes very, very small amounts of resources to run.

There are tons of advantages, but I'll warn you--you won't know the entire system right away. Just like with Windows, it takes some time to get used to it. Once you do, though, you'll kick your own ass for not doing it sooner.
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Posted 1/19/16

sarteck wrote:


Freddy96NO wrote:


sarteck wrote:
I honestly don't get why more people don't switch (at least partially) to Linux.
Dunno who is "closest" to windows but was it linux that is quite close or not?



Hmmm... How to put this...

You probably already know, but Linux has many different "flavors," and some tend to be very user friendly, some tend to be a little harder to use (but easier to make into what you want).

The most Windows-like flavor would probably be Mint, followed closely by Ubuntu. Those are the two I would recommend as desktops for any new users, simply because it'll be easier to use than many others. Plus, Mint (and a version of Ubuntu called Xubuntu) takes very, very small amounts of resources to run.

There are tons of advantages, but I'll warn you--you won't know the entire system right away. Just like with Windows, it takes some time to get used to it. Once you do, though, you'll kick your own ass for not doing it sooner.


I've tried several times in the past, and each time I had to go back because of some package that wasn't playing nicely... At the end of jumping through several hoops and looking up advice on forums about those kinds of problems I just gave up and went back.

Even without the misbehaving packages, triple-A PC gaming titles are still largely on Windows. I'm not going to play Star Wars Battlefront from Wine...
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Posted 1/19/16

Rujikin wrote:

Linux mint is close in terms of the user interface http://www.linuxmint.com/



Though the OS is quite different but its kind of nice. It's free, comes with most of the software you will use, comes with a built in firewall, almost never gets viruses (viruses need your password to execute and need to be marked as allowed to execute). https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Antivirus

There is TONS of free software you can download for it too and its in a setup similar to google play store, minus having to pay for anything.


Honestly, the thing I loved MOST about Linux was software repositories.

[To others in the thread]
"Software repositories" are collections of locations where software is stored on the Internet. When talking about it in Linux terms, it basically means you can install all your shit from ONE place, instead of having to hunt down all over the Internet to find and update your programs. It's kind of like "Windows Update" except for basically all of the programs you install from the repos.
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Posted 1/19/16

sarteck wrote:


Freddy96NO wrote:


sarteck wrote:
I honestly don't get why more people don't switch (at least partially) to Linux.
Dunno who is "closest" to windows but was it linux that is quite close or not?



Hmmm... How to put this...

You probably already know, but Linux has many different "flavors," and some tend to be very user friendly, some tend to be a little harder to use (but easier to make into what you want).

The most Windows-like flavor would probably be Mint, followed closely by Ubuntu. Those are the two I would recommend as desktops for any new users, simply because it'll be easier to use than many others. Plus, Mint (and a version of Ubuntu called Xubuntu) takes very, very small amounts of resources to run.

There are tons of advantages, but I'll warn you--you won't know the entire system right away. Just like with Windows, it takes some time to get used to it. Once you do, though, you'll kick your own ass for not doing it sooner.

So, a new user doesn't really have to be that tech savvy at all? I was considering linux for my next computer, but I saw some stuff online that I literally didn't have a clue what was going on lol. Is it more advantageous to learn and use the 'harder' versions of linux?
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Posted 1/19/16

nanikore2 wrote:


sarteck wrote:


Freddy96NO wrote:


sarteck wrote:
I honestly don't get why more people don't switch (at least partially) to Linux.
Dunno who is "closest" to windows but was it linux that is quite close or not?



Hmmm... How to put this...

You probably already know, but Linux has many different "flavors," and some tend to be very user friendly, some tend to be a little harder to use (but easier to make into what you want).

The most Windows-like flavor would probably be Mint, followed closely by Ubuntu. Those are the two I would recommend as desktops for any new users, simply because it'll be easier to use than many others. Plus, Mint (and a version of Ubuntu called Xubuntu) takes very, very small amounts of resources to run.

There are tons of advantages, but I'll warn you--you won't know the entire system right away. Just like with Windows, it takes some time to get used to it. Once you do, though, you'll kick your own ass for not doing it sooner.


I've tried several times in the past, and each time I had to go back because of some package that wasn't playing nicely... At the end of jumping through several hoops and looking up advice on forums about those kinds of problems I just gave up and went back.

Even without the misbehaving packages, triple-A PC gaming titles are still largely on Windows. I'm not going to play Star Wars Battlefront from Wine...


I dunno what kind of issue you were facing, so I can't really say what might have been your problem, heh. As far as playing Battlefront through WINE, just don't do it? Boot up your Windows partition for that. (Although both I & II have platinum ratings in the WineHQ AppDB, so I'm not so sure you'd have any issues.)

But yes, there are AAA games that don't work well with Linux, at least not right away. That's why, for those who modern gaming is important, I recommended dual-boot systems. Use your Linux for normal everyday shit, then just boot into your Windows when you want to game.
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Posted 1/19/16

sarteck wrote:

[To others in the thread]
"Software repositories" are collections of locations where software is stored on the Internet. When talking about it in Linux terms, it basically means you can install all your shit from ONE place, instead of having to hunt down all over the Internet to find and update your programs. It's kind of like "Windows Update" except for basically all of the programs you install from the repos.


I thought I could switch over precisely because of the repositories... Until I ran into some of those odd stuff that aren't in them and start having problems with them.

Yes M$ sux... However, individual executables (whether they're installs or not) are pretty easy to handle in Windows in comparison.
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Posted 1/19/16

XxDarkSasuxX wrote:


sarteck wrote:


Freddy96NO wrote:


sarteck wrote:
I honestly don't get why more people don't switch (at least partially) to Linux.
Dunno who is "closest" to windows but was it linux that is quite close or not?



Hmmm... How to put this...

You probably already know, but Linux has many different "flavors," and some tend to be very user friendly, some tend to be a little harder to use (but easier to make into what you want).

The most Windows-like flavor would probably be Mint, followed closely by Ubuntu. Those are the two I would recommend as desktops for any new users, simply because it'll be easier to use than many others. Plus, Mint (and a version of Ubuntu called Xubuntu) takes very, very small amounts of resources to run.

There are tons of advantages, but I'll warn you--you won't know the entire system right away. Just like with Windows, it takes some time to get used to it. Once you do, though, you'll kick your own ass for not doing it sooner.

So, a new user doesn't really have to be that tech savvy at all? I was considering linux for my next computer, but I saw some stuff online that I literally didn't have a clue what was going on lol. Is it more advantageous to learn and use the 'harder' versions of linux?


No, not really. Granted, just like with Windows, there might be things you have to look up, ask about, etc., or you could just do what most of us did with Windows--use it so much that you kind of figure it out as you go along, heh.

What's really great about Ubuntu (and by extension Mint) is that the community is always super-eager to help nubs, and will go out of their way to help you if you post on the forums, etc.

My parents, about 60 and retarded when it comes to anything tech, have been using the Xubuntu I set up for them for five or six years without much problem (they did hae one problem that I had to fix for them, but other than that, they were golden).
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Posted 1/19/16

sarteck wrote:

I dunno what kind of issue you were facing, so I can't really say what might have been your problem, heh. As far as playing Battlefront through WINE, just don't do it? Boot up your Windows partition for that. (Although both I & II have platinum ratings in the WineHQ AppDB, so I'm not so sure you'd have any issues.)

But yes, there are AAA games that don't work well with Linux, at least not right away. That's why, for those who modern gaming is important, I recommended dual-boot systems. Use your Linux for normal everyday shit, then just boot into your Windows when you want to game.


I would dual-boot, except windoze 8.1/10 doesn't play too nicely with multiboot (at least they don't make it as easy as on Windows 7, because M$ decides to have it so I have to go through _their_ boot to get anywhere first) and that sort of makes me choose... At least that was the last time I tried. Who knows, maybe EasyBCD came up with an updated version that could easily merge everything into a single Win10 boot menu.

As for Battlefront, I'm playing that new one that's basically a re-skin of Battlefield 4.

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Posted 1/19/16

nanikore2 wrote:


sarteck wrote:

[To others in the thread]
"Software repositories" are collections of locations where software is stored on the Internet. When talking about it in Linux terms, it basically means you can install all your shit from ONE place, instead of having to hunt down all over the Internet to find and update your programs. It's kind of like "Windows Update" except for basically all of the programs you install from the repos.


I thought I could switch over precisely because of the repositories... Until I ran into some of those odd stuff that aren't in them and start having problems with them.

Yes M$ sux... However, individual executables (whether they're installs or not) are pretty easy to handle in Windows in comparison.


If you are installing from the repositories, your dependencies are generally satisfied automatically, as it will choose to download whatever it needs to run whatever it needs to run [etc. etc.] what you want.

E.G.
If you wanted to install a PBJ sammich, it would see that you have a knife and bread, but you don't have peanut butter, jelly, or a spoon, so it would download those for you and then install the PBJ sandwich. If you wanted to install a lunch, if would install those, install the PBJ sammich, install a banana, and then install a glass of milk.

That's why, in your case, I think you may have taken something you'd seen on a similar problem you found on the Internet, tried to apply it, and screwed yourself over because you didn't stick to the repositories. The reason I say this is only because I had done the exact same thing before, looooong time ago.

(Also, most Windows stand-alone executables run fine on Linux through WINE--quite often even better.)
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