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Post Reply Do people care about fat?
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Posted 2/7/16
Athletes such as wrestlers that are well-bulked with muscles would still be considered fat by insurance people.

"What do you mean fat?! Have you seen these muscles??"

"I'm sorry, sir. According to the scale you're heavy, so you're fat."


At the end, it seems like insurance companies determine who lives and who dies.

(ref Saw)
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Posted 2/7/16 , edited 2/7/16
I have idea how it feels to be over weight. I think people exercise to get a body that they feel confident in. So, there's necessarily no perfect body. A lot of girls would want to look like VS model xD

Also, my parents are annoying.. they usually call me fat when I'm clearly not lol.

Asian parents.
Tarya 
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Posted 2/7/16

KamisamanoOtaku wrote:


Rujikin wrote:

Get rid of your constant source of sugar pop. Don't replace it with diet pop remove pop from your diet. Treat it like booze not something you should drink all the time. Make sure to eat breakfast everyday even if its something small/quick to start your metabolism, you basically fast during the night and eating signals your metabolism to start up.

Eat less highly processed foods and try to eat foods that have less processing and are using more natural ingredients (as in it comes from a plant/animal not a chemical processing plant). You will have to cook more but the natural foods absorb slower and give your body energy over a longer period of time which decreases how much sugars get absorbed by fat cells.

My friends did this and lost 100lbs and 200lbs by sitting on their butts.


Thanks for the advice: I actually know most of it and it is sound. For those reading this that aren't aware, exercise doesn't burn a tremendous amount of calories for most folks and can easily stimulate your appetite, so exercise alone is rarely going to compensate for caloric consumption. Unless you're an Olympic swimmer in training. ;)

Most people like myself just need to cut way back on calories consumed. Making sure you're getting the nutrition you need can also be important, as it isn't uncommon for people to overeat because while they consume too many calories, they aren't actually getting all the nutrients their bodies need.

I actually have to mind how much soda pop I drink and I cannot drink diet soda. Part of my problem is I developed Irritable Bowel Syndrome almost 10 years ago and its the bad kind. For example if I eat more than trace amounts of beef I'll be laid up with stomach cramps for anywhere from several hours to a few days. Can't handle lettuce or dairy products other than cheese either. Basically if it is difficult to digest I need to avoid it. Nuts are also out, especially raw as I am prone to swelling in my gastrointestinal track and that does not go well with nuts. @_@

Part of why it has been difficult to lose weight has been that most of what I can eat are breads... or so I thought. Finally doing a little research after dismissing it years earlier, I may actually be somewhat gluten intolerant. So I'm trying to figure out a gluten free diet based on my current, IBS and wallet imposed restrictions. Even if it turns out I'm not gluten intolerant to some degree, cutting it will force me to eliminate most processed foods. Also it turns out wheat (even whole grains) products really spike your blood sugar before it crashes back down, making it very easy to graze on them all day.

TL;DR: What Rujikin says is true. I added a bit to it and explained my personal situation.


You mentioned in your previous post about not undergoing a quick fix - what do you consider that as?
I had Gastric Bypass in June 2015, but I wouldn't consider any weightloss surgery as a quick fix. They are a lifelong commitment to changing your eating habits.
I had Lapband prior to the Gastric Bypass (in 2010) which failed for me; I lost 70+ lbs and gained it all back. I wasn't able to maintain a restrictive diet on Lapband, but a malabsorpitive diet with Gastric Bypass works much better for me.
Since having the Gastric Bypass, the stomach issues I was having reversed themselves. I had severe acid reflux, to the point that I couldn't sleep lying down or I would aspirate bile. I always felt like I was drowning when I slept, even taking omeprazole to lessen the acid didn't help. I also had obstructive sleep apnea, and this is almost a non-factor now.

When did you notice you had IBS? Has it been a recent development, or has it gotten worse with weight gain? Alot of
other health conditions get worse with weight gain (other than the obvious ones like diabetes and heart disease). And some conditions like IBS can get better with surgeries like Gastric Bypass.
Not trying to push anyone to have weightloss surgery as it is a huge undertaking and always has its own set of risks, but don't count it out if you are really committed and want to lose weight and feel like you need a tool to help. Because really, that is all that weightloss surgery is, a tool - you still have to choose how to use that tool.

I max'ed out at 310 lbs before the surgery, the day of surgery I was 291, and now I am at 204.
8 months = 87 lbs lost

I don't think I will ever be back down to 150 lbs realistically, unless I have abdominalplasty, but my goal is between 170-180 lbs and to be as healthy as I can be.
Just an FYI - you have to take vitamins for the rest of your life with Gastric Bypass. Of course, we people in our 30's should probably be taking vitamins daily anyways, and there is an upside, because I barely get sick anymore, and when I do get a cold, it is gone in a less than a week. :)
And if you aren't already, try vitamin B12 - it helps with digestion. Sometimes as we age, our stomachs create less of this vitamin, and we don't digest foods as well. This might help with the IBS too. I have to take it because with the GB, they bypassed the part of my stomach that produces the vitamin.
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Posted 2/7/16

stars201 wrote:

I want a perfect body


I want a perfect soul.
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18 / F / Croatia
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Posted 2/7/16
I want to look beautiful, but I'm too lazy and depression isn't being helpful in any way.
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Posted 2/7/16
I think it does matter to a lot of people and on the days I believe in a God then I think that she/he must obviously love diversity because she/he made people of all shapes, sizes and colors. The important question to ask is if your weight bothers you? If so then obviously you should do something about it. It does bother me a bit to see really obese people just because I know that can't feel good on them. It's dangerous for their health and people are mean to them. It also bothers me if I see someone who's way too skinny and are anorexic. I've always been too naturally skinny and can't gain a pound to save my life so I'm sort of on the opposite end of the spectrum. I can empathize though because I try so hard to gain some weight and would like to be at least 145 lbs but aren't even close to it yet. A strong breeze is my mortal enemy.

It really doesn't matter what others think. If you're happy with how you are then that's awesome. That's all that matters. If you're not then try to do something about it. I know it's not always easy because I can't seem to gain any weight so I can just imagine how it is for people who actually do eat well and exercise and are still unable to shed any pounds. I've seen big people that look really good and are extremely active. The weight looks right on them just like I've seen skinny people who don't look good and vice versa. Unfortunately a lot of attention is put on one's image these days and a lot of people won't look past what they initially see which is a shame. There's a lot of really awesome people out there for you to meet if you are able to look at who they truly are and not what they look like.

Do what makes you happy but be careful not to go to extremes. Eating too much so that you become obese and cannot do everyday normal things is not good. Eating too little and becoming anorexic is not good. Moderation in all things. Eat, have fun but exercise too. With the exception of medical problems weight gain/loss is a simple calculation. In order to lose weight you just have to give off more energy than you receive. Exercise > consumption/diet = weight loss or Consumption/diet > exercise = weight gain.
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Posted 2/7/16

Tarya wrote:


KamisamanoOtaku wrote:

Thanks for the advice: I actually know most of it and it is sound. For those reading this that aren't aware, exercise doesn't burn a tremendous amount of calories for most folks and can easily stimulate your appetite, so exercise alone is rarely going to compensate for caloric consumption. Unless you're an Olympic swimmer in training. ;)

Most people like myself just need to cut way back on calories consumed. Making sure you're getting the nutrition you need can also be important, as it isn't uncommon for people to overeat because while they consume too many calories, they aren't actually getting all the nutrients their bodies need.

I actually have to mind how much soda pop I drink and I cannot drink diet soda. Part of my problem is I developed Irritable Bowel Syndrome almost 10 years ago and its the bad kind. For example if I eat more than trace amounts of beef I'll be laid up with stomach cramps for anywhere from several hours to a few days. Can't handle lettuce or dairy products other than cheese either. Basically if it is difficult to digest I need to avoid it. Nuts are also out, especially raw as I am prone to swelling in my gastrointestinal track and that does not go well with nuts. @_@

Part of why it has been difficult to lose weight has been that most of what I can eat are breads... or so I thought. Finally doing a little research after dismissing it years earlier, I may actually be somewhat gluten intolerant. So I'm trying to figure out a gluten free diet based on my current, IBS and wallet imposed restrictions. Even if it turns out I'm not gluten intolerant to some degree, cutting it will force me to eliminate most processed foods. Also it turns out wheat (even whole grains) products really spike your blood sugar before it crashes back down, making it very easy to graze on them all day.

TL;DR: What Rujikin says is true. I added a bit to it and explained my personal situation.


You mentioned in your previous post about not undergoing a quick fix - what do you consider that as?
I had Gastric Bypass in June 2015, but I wouldn't consider any weightloss surgery as a quick fix. They are a lifelong commitment to changing your eating habits.
I had Lapband prior to the Gastric Bypass (in 2010) which failed for me; I lost 70+ lbs and gained it all back. I wasn't able to maintain a restrictive diet on Lapband, but a malabsorpitive diet with Gastric Bypass works much better for me.
Since having the Gastric Bypass, the stomach issues I was having reversed themselves. I had severe acid reflux, to the point that I couldn't sleep lying down or I would aspirate bile. I always felt like I was drowning when I slept, even taking omeprazole to lessen the acid didn't help. I also had obstructive sleep apnea, and this is almost a non-factor now.

When did you notice you had IBS? Has it been a recent development, or has it gotten worse with weight gain? Alot of
other health conditions get worse with weight gain (other than the obvious ones like diabetes and heart disease). And some conditions like IBS can get better with surgeries like Gastric Bypass.
Not trying to push anyone to have weightloss surgery as it is a huge undertaking and always has its own set of risks, but don't count it out if you are really committed and want to lose weight and feel like you need a tool to help. Because really, that is all that weightloss surgery is, a tool - you still have to choose how to use that tool.

I max'ed out at 310 lbs before the surgery, the day of surgery I was 291, and now I am at 204.
8 months = 87 lbs lost

I don't think I will ever be back down to 150 lbs realistically, unless I have abdominalplasty, but my goal is between 170-180 lbs and to be as healthy as I can be.
Just an FYI - you have to take vitamins for the rest of your life with Gastric Bypass. Of course, we people in our 30's should probably be taking vitamins daily anyways, and there is an upside, because I barely get sick anymore, and when I do get a cold, it is gone in a less than a week. :)
And if you aren't already, try vitamin B12 - it helps with digestion. Sometimes as we age, our stomachs create less of this vitamin, and we don't digest foods as well. This might help with the IBS too. I have to take it because with the GB, they bypassed the part of my stomach that produces the vitamin.


1) By "quick fix" I meant that many think you can eat whatever you want until you start to get fat, then you just start eating right (or just eat wrong but in a different manner) for a few months to shed the pounds before going right back to what you were doing.

2) Surgery would be a drastic measure; there are some people whose lives have been saved by the various procedures and if that is what it took for you to lose the weight, then I am glad you received it (and based on your words, you did need it). However all surgical options still require some basic level of self-control. I have considered it but given that I can easily gorge on high calorie foods, it does not seem like a valid option for myself; it might change the quantity of what I eat, but not my actual caloric intake, at least for long. I must learn how to actually eat a healthy diet and develop the discipline to follow through on it.

3) When I knuckle down, keep a food journal, and restrict my caloric intake a little (but not much), I can gradually lose weight: it might take a year, but I'll shed 40 to 70 lbs. Granted since I weigh about 500 lbs, this is not much. In some sense it is like a video game that you know you can beat, but there are no mid points or save states so every time you fail, you have to go right back to the beginning and start over; I just need to keep at it until I finally have a successful run, then remember to save (not fall back into bad habits).

4) My IBS means almost any oral medication make me ill; I've tried including vitamins before because of how difficult eating a balanced diet can be even when I am trying, and I found out vitamins act like most medications, causing a bad reaction. My IBS was first diagnosed because of some other issues it had caused in my mid-20s, but now that we know what it is, I appear to have been suffering from it since childhood. My parents just didn't realize how abnormal various aspects of my day were and neither did I. Others either were totally unaware or also wrote it off as "typical fat kid issues".
Tarya 
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Posted 2/8/16


1) By "quick fix" I meant that many think you can eat whatever you want until you start to get fat, then you just start eating right (or just eat wrong but in a different manner) for a few months to shed the pounds before going right back to what you were doing.

2) Surgery would be a drastic measure; there are some people whose lives have been saved by the various procedures and if that is what it took for you to lose the weight, then I am glad you received it (and based on your words, you did need it). However all surgical options still require some basic level of self-control. I have considered it but given that I can easily gorge on high calorie foods, it does not seem like a valid option for myself; it might change the quantity of what I eat, but not my actual caloric intake, at least for long. I must learn how to actually eat a healthy diet and develop the discipline to follow through on it.

3) When I knuckle down, keep a food journal, and restrict my caloric intake a little (but not much), I can gradually lose weight: it might take a year, but I'll shed 40 to 70 lbs. Granted since I weigh about 500 lbs, this is not much. In some sense it is like a video game that you know you can beat, but there are no mid points or save states so every time you fail, you have to go right back to the beginning and start over; I just need to keep at it until I finally have a successful run, then remember to save (not fall back into bad habits).

4) My IBS means almost any oral medication make me ill; I've tried including vitamins before because of how difficult eating a balanced diet can be even when I am trying, and I found out vitamins act like most medications, causing a bad reaction. My IBS was first diagnosed because of some other issues it had caused in my mid-20s, but now that we know what it is, I appear to have been suffering from it since childhood. My parents just didn't realize how abnormal various aspects of my day were and neither did I. Others either were totally unaware or also wrote it off as "typical fat kid issues".

1. Ahhh, gotcha. I tend to think of diet pills and purges as quick fix tools. Unfortunately, it is much harder to shed 10 lbs then it is to gain it (poor saps).

2. Surgery isn't drastic if you have made up your mind about it. I guess to outsiders, it would seem like a last resort type of deal, but to me, it didn't really seem that way. I did not need the Gastric Bypass, but went through alot of hoops to have it done...I did need the Lapband removed because it was causing the acid reflux. Insurance is chintzy sometimes (lol).
I would not say I have self control, and that is why Gastric Bypass was the better option - and trust me, cutting down on portion size will dramatically curtail calorie intake, you do not have a choice unless you would like to be visiting the restroom constantly, or like being nauseous. However, you don't have to do it alone. You have to take classes, visit a nutritionist and therapist before the surgery is even approved to go over your food addictions and what reasons you have for emotional eating.

3. Weight Watchers was great - if I only needed to lose 30-40 lbs. Being accountable to others also helped me lose weight. But in the end, I would always cheat and slip back into bad habits. The gastric bypass has kept me from being able to consume sugar or large amounts of carbs and fat, without a negative physical reaction (dumping syndrome, not pleasant). Maybe it could be termed negative reinforcement??
Either way, you only try once or twice unless you are determined you don't mind feeling nasty. It does take a few months to really get good habits in place, learn healthy options for when you go out to eat, keep healthy food at your home, and learn to ignore other people in your household who contribute and may not necessarily be as supportive as you would hope they would be (sabotage). Support groups work wonders though, and again, outside accountability can help keep you on track.

4. I am so sorry - that sucks! Have you spoken with a nutritionist or an allergist that might be able to work with you on meal plans and anti-gluten foods? I don't know if a PCP would have the knowledge to help recommend medications or vitamins that you could take that don't irritate your IBS...
Maybe sub-lingual types of medication that are absorbed under the tongue instead of pills? I don't know if they even make vitamins like that, but I know they have injectable vitamins - you would probably have to get a referral for those though, and insurance approval.

Again, not pushing surgery as a cure all or anything, just trying to be helpful, if I am even achieving that (lol).


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Posted 2/8/16
Living a healthy life is the best, you don't feel guilty nor exactly hungry.
Posted 2/9/16
I don't mind my body weight but because I live in Colorado and CO is one of the healthiest states in America they do talk a lot of shit about my weight. I just tell them to eat a dick, because they look so malnourished.
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Posted 2/9/16 , edited 2/9/16
Yes people care, I definitely do, it's why I turned one of my bed rooms into a gym. Being fat, in most cases, shows how unhealthy a person is. I've met plenty who didn't care though, and good for them.
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Posted 2/9/16 , edited 2/9/16
I was extremely overweight in 6th and 7th grade (in 7th grade I was 5' 2" and weighed 175). It was because I thought it was fun to try and eat as much as I possibly could every single time I ate and would compete with myself to see how much I could eat. Others kids started to make fun of me in 7th grade for being fat (I switched schools that year and at my previous school I was still fat but was friends with plenty and no one made fun of me in 6th grade). I became self conscious and started to do a simple 100 push ups and 100 sit ups a day (and stopped overeating significantly) and by 8th grade I weighed 135. This drastic loss is partially due to adolescence and it wouldn't likely be as easy if you are an adult though. In high school I played football and picked up lifting weights from that so to stay healthy after high school I just continued to go to the gym and lift at least 2 times a week and decided to run a simple 7 minute mile at least 3 times a week and thats what I have done for the past 4.5 years to stay healthy. Now I am 6' 1" and weigh 210 (which may sound slightly overweight but its only because I lift).
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Posted 2/9/16

Nalaniel wrote:

I want to look beautiful, but I'm too lazy and depression isn't being helpful in any way.


youd be suprised at how much beauty comes from the inside. no one want to date an evil barbie, no matter how sexy or pretty she is.
as for me, yeah, it bothers me.
the only bit of self esteem i have comes from my staying a health weight. but the damn meds leave me hungry all the time. after a while you get used to the feeling, and eathing out means a 50% chance i puke it up 20 minutes later. i just cant eat unhealth food anymore. even a steak thats not lean gives me trouble.
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 2/9/16 , edited 2/9/16

FruitPunchSamurai987 wrote:

Have you ever seen 600 lb. people? After some point people should care.


I wholeheartedly agree. Ya don't need to be some Greek God or something but visible body fat is just disgusting. And anyone trying to molly coddle fat people should be admitted to an asylum ya dig.
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Posted 2/10/16

nemoskull wrote:


Nalaniel wrote:

I want to look beautiful, but I'm too lazy and depression isn't being helpful in any way.


youd be suprised at how much beauty comes from the inside. no one want to date an evil barbie, no matter how sexy or pretty she is.


I'm sure nobody wants to date a person that's not sexy, too. They all keep thinking "I want a person that's sexy both inside and on the outside".
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