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Posted 2/10/16

Sogno- wrote:

yeah everything in the OP minus a crush on the dukes... lol

also despite what mom warned i never got leeches from playing in the ditches and the creeks . also don't think i picked out my own switch heh

not only did i ride bikes without a helmet i rode horses without a helmet. sometimes even without a saddle . fell off a lot too l ol


I never spent much time on horseback. My wife has me beat on that one, and the scars to go with it

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Posted 2/10/16
No cassettes, no Dukes or Hee Haw. My grandma still has a rotary wall phone. Not a desk phone though.
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68 / M / Columbia, MO
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Posted 2/10/16 , edited 2/10/16
-never wore helmets riding anything motorized outdoors
-rode on farm machinery well aware 1 trip & fall meant maimed by tractor tire or death
-rode on the sides of older pickup trucks long distances that had the short side boards behind the cab
-rural phone service was a party line where you either overheard everyone else's stuff while waiting your turn to call & jabber
-pop sold for a nickle (New Orleans, 1957)
-milk sold for a dime so I always chose pop twice
-pop came in glass bottles, aluminum cans were unheard of
-beer was either on tap in a bar, glass bottles or came in tin cans with advertising embellished all 'round

-danger PC police alert:
I was 9 years old when the USPHS transferred us to their hospital base stationed in New Orleans. Here are some childhood memories from that era while living down South 2-1/2 years.

In 1950's New Orleans people of color rode in the back of public transportation. People of color were not allowed to ride in the front 6 rows on public transportation. On the streetcars and trolley busses there were 2 holes drilled into the steel/aluminum back bars of the seats that accommodated signage. One had the option of moving the wooden sign that read "For Colored" back or forward along the rows of seats beyond the first obligatory rows reserved for whites
-most of the public transit drivers and motormen working for NOPSI in the 1950's were male, white or mulatto....not black, not female
-many restaurants in NOLA and parts of the South did not serve blacks. They were not tolerated / allowed to come through the front entrance. Many eateries had side windows, rear doors by the kitchen for "service". Signs that read "We reserve the right to Refuse Service to Anyone" were prominent in most eateries.
-Civil War chatter tinged with animosity against anyone from the "North" still persisted
-never saw the KKK anywhere, ever (not saying they were non-existent, just didn't knowingly associate with any)

end PC-mined area.....take a deep breath. Chill.

-Bourbon Street was wide open. A kid could sneak in and gape at the near nude ladies almost without fear of being kicked out. A kid could not buy booze then either.
-Beatniks were prominent in / near Royal Street. My Mom was friends with a few who sold antiques and (guess). Cool times.
-Southern Hospitality did exist though it took me almost a year (transferred in from Yankee Land aka NYC) to fit in in school. Still better than NYC and Baltimore back then (Easterners...so reserved, provincial, clannish).
-gas sold for 15 to 22 cents / gallon
-could take short cuts through back yards, no fear
-could walk long distances as a kid to visit friends, no fear
-did encounter clannish, non-friendly ethnics many times while residing in 1950's NYC as a kid
-did not carry money or wallet in pant pockets of jacket while residing in NYC waiting for a bus account pickpockets
-keep NYC bus public transit windows closed account flying rocks, bricks, bottles. Those objects hurt big time when they hit you.

Most memorable NYC city bus ride was 1966. My aunt was a devout Catholic who played the organ at one of the diocese churches in the older part of the city every Sunday at 11 am. Getting there meant riding the Lexington Avenue subway (no biggie even if only 2 white people at station or on subway. Everyone was cordial, cool. No worries). The ride of interest involved a trip through Hell's Kitchen on a city bus. Luckily it was of metal construction and had a decent roof. Members of the neighborhood would welcome all comers with souvenirs from their neighborhood: rocks, bottles, bricks, odd stuff. At 1 stop there was a kid hiding out in a drug store alcove. When the bus came within 50 yards of the stop the kid made a break for the doors. The driver was able to open those doors, close them right behind the fleeting kid. Two bullies were in hot pursuit. One tried to throw a knife while the other one got his hand stuck in the closed door. Now, the bus never did quite come to a stop; it was a continuous slow roll, open door, shut door, roll away. The kid outside running along side the bus was screaming epithets deleted at the driver and demanding he stop. The driver picked up speed, briefly opened the door and there went the 1 bully, rolling ass over tea kettle along the curb...ha ha. This was a route low seniority drivers got. I chatted with the driver the remainder of the run to the church where my aunt attended as the organist. Since one of my dreams then was to be a city bus driver....by god, this experience was food for thought.

Still awake?
DJ72 
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Posted 2/10/16 , edited 2/10/16
Yes, I watched Hee Haw

I was spanked with one of those thin wooden paddles that came with a ball and string (both got removed, of course)
Only 3 swats to the rear for every offense; could've been much worse although it did sting.

I didn't play in creeks too often because I lived 10-15 minutes from the beach.

My uncles let me ride in the back of their pickup trucks. One was fairly safe since it had a cover.

Don't know if I'd call it a crush, but I did think Daisy Duke was pretty. I only had 4 channels

Didn't wear a bike helmet; really should have. There were trails in the woods of my neighborhood and others nearby. I would go riding and exploring for hours and feel perfectly safe. A lot of parents now only let their kids ride on their own street or only where they can be seen at all times. That makes me sad for modern kids. Riding my bike was one of my first and most enjoyable chances to be independent.



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Posted 2/11/16 , edited 2/11/16

bemused_Bohemian wrote:
Still awake?


I always find it fascinating how rapidly life has changed from one generation to the next.

I also feel sad about how little independence and freedom kids are given these day compared to that enjoyed by earlier generations.

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68 / M / Columbia, MO
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Posted 2/11/16 , edited 2/11/16
NOLA, 1958

My mother bought me a standard design bicycle via Sears Roebuck. They had none in stock so I got a J C Higgins English bike as a substitute. That bike expanded my world, as you have guessed. Now I could roam all over NOLA. We lived within 7 blocks of Audubon Park, school was 6 blocks away, Mississippi River levees a little further. I used to ride along the levees for something to do. Tried swimming in the river where the big ships came in and out once while unsupervised, almost drowned. Curtailed that experiment as a kid, never repeated it.

One day while riding below the levee on my bike I saw 2 older kids walking along the crown, no big deal. As I was peddling along 2 pool hall cue balls came whizzing by my face at great velocity narrowly missing my temple. As I stopped I looked around. No one nearby except for the 2 kids up on the levee crown. One of those kids had a good throwing arm as those 2 balls came within inches of being a direct hit. One more revolution on my bike pedal would have amounted to "SCORE". Noticing the direction and trajectory of those missiles with no fear I peddled in their direction and confronted them. Of course they didn't know anything, claimed they didn't do anything. One on one would've been a fight refreshing someone's memory re assaults on the sly by punks. However, my past experience with 2 to 1 odds meant I usually didn't fare so well. I think they were surprised I confronted them in the first place. No fists, it ended as a standoff, epithets deleted as I rode away.

Ah, liberty. So much fun as a youth in spite of the bullshit.
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8500 / F / Apollo...
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Posted 2/11/16

Dariamus wrote:

Something from Facebook this morning. How many of these things do you remember doing as a child? I did every single item on the list +



According to this post, I did not have a childhood. I experienced nothing on this list.
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